Bianchi launches new aero bike with ‘NASA technology’

Bianchi has announced a new aero bike – the Bianchi Oltre XR3 (and yes, it’s celeste)

The Bianchi Oltre XR3 is the newest addition to Italian company’s collection of aero road bikes and is intended to sit below the range topping Oltre XR4.

The new Oltre XR3 is claimed to feature much of the same frame-design features and developments first seen in the Bianchi Oltre XR4, including Bianchi’s Countervail patented technology.

Bianchi Oltre XR3

The XR3 is inspired by, and derived from, the XR4, and with it, Bianchi is hoping to bring its aero bike platform to wider number of customers.

This suggests that although pricing is to be announced, the new Bianchi Oltre XR3 will be more affordable than the XR4 which currently retails for £8,350 in a Campagnolo Super Record build.

According to Bianchi, “the Bianchi Oltre XR3 delivers the perfect combination of control, and the competitive advantage of advanced aerodynamics.”

“Countervail” technology is said to be embedded within the entire frame, but what is it?

According to Bianchi: “Countervail is a carbon composite-material system that, with its special fiber architecture, combines patented structural carbon with viscoelastic resin. Countervail cancels 80% of vibrations while increasing the stiffness and strength of our carbon frames and forks.”

Bianchi Oltre XR3

Bianchi suggests “traditional passive damping in frames using superficial rubber inserts and isolators are marginally effective compared to the integrated carbon Countervail system,” added that the technology has been “proven in the extreme conditions of NASA aerospace operations.”

However, Bianchi didn’t go into details about the specifics of what these “NASA aerospace operations” entailed.

Bianchi Oltre XR3

The rear end of the Bianchi Oltre XR3. Note the aero seat post

Frame Specs for the XR3

  • Carbon Monocoque technology
  • High strength + medium modulus carbon fibers with Countervail material
  • Unidirectional carbon woven
  • Aero shape and design
  • BB set Press Fit 86.5 x 41
  • Internal cable routing
  • Full carbon dropout with metal insert
  • Weight in 55 size: 1110g (+/- 5%)

As mentioned, pricing for the Bianchi Oltre XR3 is to be confirmed, but a list of models and specs is as follows.

SHIMANO DURA ACE 11sp Compact 50/34
Wheels: Fulcrum Racing Quattro LG

CAMPAGNOLO CHORUS 11sp Compact 52/36
Wheels: Fulcrum Racing Quattro LG

SHIMANO ULTEGRA Di2 11sp Compact 52/36
Wheels: Fulcrum Racing Quattro LG

SHIMANO ULTEGRA 11sp Compact 52/36
Wheels: Fulcrum Racing 7 LG

CAMPAGNOLO POTENZA 11sp Compact 52/36
Wheels: Fulcrum Racing 7 LG

SHIMANO 105 11sp Compact 52/36
Wheels: Fulcrum Racing Sport


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Track World Championships 2017 live TV guide

In the first major track meet since the Olympics, you’ll be able to relive the excitement and passion at this years World Track Championship in Hong Kong

BBC Two and Eurosport will be showing live coverage of the evening sessions of the championships.

After an incredibly strong Olympics, British Cycling have been forced to go with a fresh faced squad giving international debuts to no less than 10 riders.

>>>Great Britain team for the 2017 Track World Championships

As predicted, both Jason and Laura Kenny will miss out as the couple take a break from track cycling to prepare for their child’s birth. Other notable absences include, Sir Bradley Wiggins, who has since retired, Mark Cavendish, who is now focussing on his road racing, and Ed Clancy who is taking some time away from the boards.

While the squad may seem lacking in experience, the team will still have four Olympic champions among their ranks in Katie Archibald, Elinor Barker, Steven Burke and Callum Skinner.

Both the BBC website and Eurosport will be airing the evening session live with selected sessions being shown on BBC Two and BBC Red Button services.

TV Schedule

NB: Schedule may be subject to change

Wednesday, 12 April
12.00-14.30 Eurosport LIVE – Track world champs
12.00-14.30 BBC Two and Connected TV live – Men’s and women’s team sprints
16.00-18.30 BBC Red Button highlights
20.00-21.30 Eurosport Highlights

Thursday, 13 April
09.30 -12.00 BBC Red Button day one highlights
09.30-10.30 Eurosport day one highlights
12.00-14.45 BBC Two and Connected TV LIVE
12.00-15.00 Eurosport LIVE
19.15-22.00 BBC Red Button highlights
20.00-21.30 Eurosport highlights

Friday, 14 April
09.15-12.00 BBC Red Button day two highlights
10.30-12.00 Eurosport day two highlights
11.50-14.40 BBC Two LIVE
12.00-15.10 Connected TV LIVE
12.00-15.10 Eurosport LIVE
19.15-22.35/22.35-01.55 BBC Red Button highlights
20.00-21.30 Eurosport highlights

Saturday, 15 April
06.00-07.30 Eurosport day three highlights
12.00-15.30 BBC Two and Connected TV LIVE
12.00-15.10 Eurosport Two LIVE

Sunday, 16 April
07.00-10.00 Eurosport LIVE
07.00-10.00 BBC Red Button day four highlights
13.00-14.15 BBC Two LIVE


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Ohio Breaststroker Nate Goldfarb Commits to Georgetown

Photo Courtesy: Kyle Goodrich

Agon is the proud sponsor of all high school coverage (recruiting, results, state championships, etc.) on SwimmingWorld.com. For more information about Agon, visit their website AgonSwim.com.

Nate Goldfarb has committed to swim for Georgetown University beginning in the fall. Goldfarb is a senior at Columbus Academy and trains with Ohio State Swim Club under Kyle Goodrich.

Goldfarb has been a consistently strong 100 breaststroker, finishing as the two time state runner up in the event. Recently, he’s seen significant improvement in his 200 breaststroke, 200 IM, and the backstroke events. His best times are now:

  • 50 Breast 26.43
  • 100 Breast 56.59
  • 200 Breast 2:03.01
  • 100 Back 54.85
  • 200 Back 1:57.66
  • 200 IM 1:55.68

Goldfarb explained,

“I have selected to pursue my education at Georgetown University so I can reach my highest goals both in the classroom and in the pool.”

At the 2017 Big East Conference Championship Goldfarb would have been a 200 Breaststroke A finalist, finishing third. Georgetown only had one swimmer in the top 16 in the event. He also would have scored fifth in the 100 breaststroke, behind the team’s own Arthur Wang (56.28) who tied for third.

To report a verbal commitment email HS@swimmingworld.com.

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World Track Championships 2017 live TV guide

In the first major track meet since the Olympics, you’ll be able to relive the excitement and passion at this years World Track Championship in Hong Kong

BBC Two and Eurosport will be showing live coverage of the evening sessions of the championships.

After an incredibly strong Olympics, British Cycling have been forced to go with a fresh faced squad giving international debuts to no less than 10 riders.

>>>Great Britain team for the 2017 Track World Championships

As predicted, both Jason and Laura Kenny will miss out as the couple take a break from track cycling to prepare for their child’s birth. Other notable absences include, Sir Bradley Wiggins, who has since retired, Mark Cavendish, who is now focussing on his road racing, and Ed Clancy who is taking some time away from the boards.

While the squad may seem lacking in experience, the team will still have four Olympic champions among their ranks in Katie Archibald, Elinor Barker, Steven Burke and Callum Skinner.

Both the BBC website and Eurosport will be airing the evening session live with selected sessions being shown on BBC Two and BBC Red Button services.

TV Schedule

NB: Schedule may be subject to change

Wednesday, 12 April
12.00-14.30 Eurosport LIVE – Track world champs
12.00-14.30 BBC Two and Connected TV live – Men’s and women’s team sprints
16.00-18.30 BBC Red Button highlights
20.00-21.30 Eurosport Highlights

Thursday, 13 April
09.30 -12.00 BBC Red Button day one highlights
09.30-10.30 Eurosport day one highlights
12.00-14.45 BBC Two and Connected TV LIVE
12.00-15.00 Eurosport LIVE
19.15-22.00 BBC Red Button highlights
20.00-21.30 Eurosport highlights

Friday, 14 April
09.15-12.00 BBC Red Button day two highlights
10.30-12.00 Eurosport day two highlights
11.50-14.40 BBC Two LIVE
12.00-15.10 Connected TV LIVE
12.00-15.10 Eurosport LIVE
19.15-22.35/22.35-01.55 BBC Red Button highlights
20.00-21.30 Eurosport highlights

Saturday, 15 April
06.00-07.30 Eurosport day three highlights
12.00-15.30 BBC Two and Connected TV LIVE
12.00-15.10 Eurosport Two LIVE

Sunday, 16 April
07.00-10.00 Eurosport LIVE
07.00-10.00 BBC Red Button day four highlights
13.00-14.15 BBC Two LIVE


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Tom Boonen: A career in pictures


After saying farewell at this year’s edition of Paris-Roubaix, we take a look at Tommeke’s illustrious career through photos

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University of Incarnate Word Picks Up Jared Wallace for Class of 2021

Photo Courtesy: Jared Wallace

Agon is the proud sponsor of all high school coverage (recruiting, results, state championships, etc.) on SwimmingWorld.com. For more information about Agon, visit their website AgonSwim.com.

The University of Incarnate Word has added Jared Wallace to the class of 2021. The high school senior attends Cypress Creek High School and swims for Team Fins in Spring, TX.

Wallace said of this decision,

“I made my decision to swim for Incarnate Word because it’s a great school and one of the only schools that has the degree I want to pursue. I love how It’s close to home, and the team is a great fit for me. The coach sees my great potential I have, and I believe the team will help me on my journey to achieving greatness.”

His top times are:

  • 100 Back 51.20
  • 200 Back 1:49.42
  • 100 Fly 49.51
  • 200 Fly 1:52.64
  • 200 IM 1:53.51

Wallace has been on a recent improvement track, as all of those times were swum in February. His best 200 backstroke time would have finished seventh at the 2017 CCSA Championships. He’d also be a 100 butterfly A finalist.

To report a verbal commitment email HS@swimmingworld.com.

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Marathon Pacing: 6 Lessons Learned from a PR Near Miss

There’s no better feeling than crossing the finish line with a new Personal Record. Missing that PR might make all that training feel like a waste, but it doesn’t have to!

Failure

Note from Jason: This post is written by Christine Sandvik, one of my former athletes who has written for SR in the past on morning running and running beyond the marathon.

I had just passed the Mile 26 sign when I finally allowed myself to check my Garmin. After sticking with the 3:30 pace group for the first half of the race, I had steadily pushed about a minute or so ahead of them over the next 13 miles.  

The end was tantalizingly close.  After a training cycle filled with highs and lows, a new PR was finally well within my reach.

Or so I thought.

I ran my marathon PR of 3:29:42 at the Boston Marathon in 2013. Even though I had run several strong marathons since then, I had been unable to better that time.  But I had pushed through sickness and training challenges, and I was convinced that today was the day.  

With less than 0.2 miles to go, I looked down and saw my Garmin hit 3:29.

What?  How was that possible?  I hoped my glycogen-deprived brain might just be misunderstanding what I saw, but that wasn’t the case.  Even if I conjured up a sub-6 minute pace to the finish, I wasn’t getting under 3:30 today.  

What had gone wrong with my marathon pacing?

I hit the finish line in 3:30:08, proud of my strong, consistent effort, but overwhelmingly disappointed by such a near miss.  Once I got over the initial disappointment, I took a strategic look back at how I could have eliminated those frustrating 26 seconds.

Marathon runners know just how many variables go into producing a strong race and the ever-elusive PR.  Training is just one of those variables.  

Race day produces its own set of challenges, and nailing your goal marathon pace while trying to focus on nutrition, weather, crowds and unexpected issues like bathroom breaks can be overwhelming.

Learning how to manage your marathon pace is a skill that you can hone with time and experience.  But I’m hoping you can take advantage of my mistakes (along with what I did right!) to shorten your learning curve and earn that PR.

Lesson 1: Let workouts dictate your marathon pace range

Training for a marathon is a lengthy process, full of ups and downs.  You will probably never experience the “perfect” training cycle, where you run every workout as scheduled and hit your target paces every time.  Life usually conspires to get in the way.

My training leading up to the Miami Marathon on January 29th was no different.  I had nearly 3 months of “perfect” training before things got challenging.  I was hitting all my scheduled mileage, nailing workouts, and my marathon pace runs were suggesting that my race pace might be faster than I originally thought.

But then the holidays came: life got overwhelmingly busy and I got sick.  I took a cutback week, and then was forced to take another when I just couldn’t shake a nasty cold.  

My final long run, a 22 miler with half the miles at goal race pace, started out ok and quickly turned into a disaster.  I walked.  I cried.  And self-doubt rapidly set in.  I know better than to beat myself up over one crappy workout, but knowing what you should do and actually doing it are two very different things.

I tried to put the long run behind me and less than a week later ran a strong medium long run with marathon pace miles.  It gave me a bit more confidence, but I still wasn’t sure about my current fitness.

Given the ups and downs in my training, and knowing that Miami had the potential to be hot on race day, I had to plan my race pace accordingly.  Just like having “A”, “B” and “C” race goals is an ideal way to go into any important race, knowing the pace range that will get you to those goals is also a necessity.  

On a perfect day, I was hoping to get close to 3:25, around 7:50/mile pace.  Given that my last month of training hadn’t been too spectacular, I was just hoping to get close to 3:30 (8:00/mile pace) and earn a PR if the conditions allowed.

When planning your goal race pace, be honest with yourself in evaluating where you are at and what you hope to accomplish.  Look at your long runs and marathon pace miles and be realistic with what you can handle.  Think about the course profile (flat or hilly) and the potential weather conditions.

On the other hand, don’t sell yourself short! I may have let my missed mileage and final long run get into my head more than they should have.  My body was ready to be pushed on race day, and I had a little too much left in the tank when I crossed the finish line.  

Although it’s tough to remember in the moment, one bad long run or missed week of hard training will not ruin an entire training cycle.  Challenging stretch goals, along with a little faith in yourself, are the best way to continue to grow and improve as a runner.

Lesson 2: It’s all about restraint

If you want to run a marathon PR, negative splits are the most efficient way to get you there.  And that means running with restraint in the early miles of your race.  

As much as we hear this advice, we’re often terrible at its execution.  The excitement of race day is hard to resist (Jason’s 2014 Boston Marathon is a great example of this!).

But be strong. Hold back.  You will ALWAYS pay for it in the later miles if you don’t.  With over 26 miles ahead of you, you’ll have plenty of time to ease into your appropriate pace.

Running with restraint is one of the things I did well in Miami. Maybe too well.  My splits show that I was gradually dialing down my pace as the race progressed.  But in retrospect, I may have held myself back too much given my goal.

MIAMI RACE SPLITS:

When you run with restraint, you walk a very fine line between holding back too much and not enough.  On a flat course like Miami, you want to run about 5-10 seconds slower than goal race pace for the first 1-3 miles, then run your target pace through mile 20, and then push yourself over the final 10k. I was probably too cautious in the first half of the marathon and didn’t push hard enough to make up that time in the second half.  

On a rolling or hilly course, pace becomes secondary to effort.  The goal is to keep your effort level roughly the same through the first 20 miles, even though your pace will vary with the terrain.  

On a course like Boston with lots of downhill sections early in the race, restraint is especially important or you’ll pay for your mistake in the final miles!

Lesson 3: Making up time: bathroom breaks and other unexpected issues

No matter how well you plan your pre-race hydration, fueling, and bathroom visits, occasionally you will need to make an unexpected stop on course.  Looking back, I should have trusted my instincts and made one last bathroom stop prior to lining up at the start.  I was worried about getting to my corral on time, and tried to convince myself I’d be fine.

I held out until mile 4, then was forced to dart in the port-o-pot as quickly as I could.  Understandably, that mile was my slowest at 8:24.  I knew I shouldn’t push too hard, too quickly to catch up, but I was feeling a little panicked about the unexpected stop.  As a result, my next mile split was 7:28, significantly faster than I intended.

I was lucky.  Throwing in a mile that was closer to tempo pace didn’t cause me to blow up (and looking back, the ease of that mile might have been a sign I could have been pushing a little harder).  But what I did was risky.  Don’t try to make up the time all at once.

A better approach would have been to make up the time gradually over several miles.  Because I was still following the pace group at that point, my goal was to get them back in sight.  But I didn’t need to rush and push the pace quite so hard.

If you need to make an unexpected stop on course, try not to panic.  As long as you feel up to it, pick the pace up ever so slightly (no more than 5-10 seconds per mile, max) and before you know it you’ll be back on track.

Lesson 4: The mental side of pacing: the good, the bad, and the ugly

Mental tenacity is an essential component of distance racing.  The more resilient you can make yourself through both physical and mental training prior to race day, the more you will benefit.

When you’re racing longer distances such as the marathon, your mind can go from blissfully happy to utterly panicked in a heartbeat.  Even when you’re feeling good physically, moments of doubt may begin to run through your head.  Knowing when to pay attention and when to quiet the chatter can make all the difference.

Maintaining an even pace and hitting negative splits late in a race is as much about mental focus as it is about physical training.  You have to plan ahead for the rough patches so that you know how to deal with negative emotions and sensations as they arise.

For some, it helps to broaden your focus.  Look at your surroundings or rock out to some motivating music to keep moving forward.  For others, it may help to narrow your focus.  Clear your head by focusing on a specific physical technique, such as your cadence, arm swing, or your breathing.

I used both techniques in Miami.  When the course turned into a headwind or the rain got heavy, I turned inward and focused on a steady, aerobic effort.  When the opportunity allowed, I tried to appreciate the surroundings.  And near the end, I turned to music to carry me through.  

I had plenty of moments of self-doubt, but I was able to let them go by focusing on one mile at a time and tackling teach one in a specific, actionable way.

Even though we are physically trying to maintain a certain minute per mile pace throughout the marathon, it’s our brain that will help us stay consistent.  So remember the following:

  • Rough patches will (usually) pass.
  • You can hold your pace longer than you think.
  • Pay attention to specific physical sensations and address them if necessary.
  • Distract yourself if it helps.
  • Turn inward and increase focus when needed.
  • Take each mile as it comes and don’t get ahead of yourself.

Lesson 5: Pace groups – yes or no?

The Miami Marathon was only the second time I decided to follow a pace group, with the goal of earning a new sub-3:30 PR.  Pace groups can be a useful tool, and most pacers work diligently to get you across the line in the designated time.  But there are definitely pros and cons to sticking with a group while racing.

I decided to start with a pace group in the first half of the race to relieve the mental burden of maintaining an appropriate pace.  It allowed me to settle in and follow the leader.  But in an effort to stick with the group, I pushed too hard to catch up after my pit stop, and then could have pushed ahead of the group from miles 7-13.

Because I chose to put complete faith in the pace group leaders for 13 miles, I never looked at my Garmin.  I lost awareness of my own sense of pacing for the race, which hurt me in the later miles. In the end, the pace group ran slower than anticipated and even though I was slightly ahead of them, I still fell short of my goal.  

Remember: pace groups leaders are not infallible.  The choice to follow them is a personal one, but my caveat is always to stay aware of your own pacing and respect the need to slow down or speed up in various parts of the race.  

Let the camaraderie and group effort carry you where it can, but trust your intuition and run your own race.

Lesson 6: Use your watch or GPS strategically

Marathon Pacing 101

This was my biggest mistake on race day.

I tend to race by feel and avoid looking at my Garmin.  Learning to run by feel is an essential skill you should practice often.  When you are trying to run a certain goal pace for a race, it’s critical to spend a lot of time at that pace in your training.  You need to learn how that pace feels and what it takes to maintain it.

Being overly reliant on your GPS device can be detrimental.  Why?

  1. GPS devices can be unreliable in remote locations or in the middle of cities with lots of tall buildings that interfere with reception.
  2. Focusing on pace on a hilly course will prevent you from running by effort, forcing you to work either too hard or not hard enough.
  3. If a race isn’t going as well as you hoped, staring at your pace can be demoralizing.  Watching the miles go by increasingly slowly can get into your head and ruin your race.

But watches and GPS devices DO have their place!  They can help prevent you from going out too fast in the early miles, and remind you when it’s time to push yourself late in the race.  

Had I paid attention to my time with 10k to go instead of several hundred yards, I could have easily shaved 30 seconds off my time.  Needless to say, I won’t make that mistake again.  Run by feel as much as possible but use technology when you need it!

Even for experienced runners, effective marathon pacing is a challenging skill that can require you to be a Zen master one moment and a drill sergeant the next.

I hope the lessons I’ve learned can help you pace yourself to a new PR in your next race!

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Five US races to look forward to this year

We take a look at some of the US’s biggest races in 2017 and why you should watch them

The American race calendar truly hits it’s stride next month when the 12th edition of the Amgen Tour of California takes place, upgraded this season to UCI WorldTour status for the first time ever.

>>> Montana senator wants to tax every visiting cyclist

Although the Tour of California is the most prestigious race on the schedule, a handful of other stage races highlight the American Tour calendar throughout the summer as well.

Tour of the Gila

The UCI 2.2 Tour of the Gila, entering it’s 31st year, is a five-stage race that runs April 19-23 in and around Silver City, New Mexico.

Featuring a road stage with 9,000 feet of climbing, stunning mountain vistas, technical descents, an often windy time trial and finishing with a speedy downtown criterium, this race has been a destination for Olympians, world champions, and up and coming stars for over three decades.

Amgen Tour of California

The Tour of California features a host of WorldTour teams and has now earned WorldTour status for 2017 (Watson)

Amgen’s Tour of California brings the best riders from around the world to compete in seven challenging stages moving from the northern part of the state and eventually finishing in Pasadena just outside of Los Angeles.

The queen stage will feature 12,000 feet of climbing as well as a finish on top of Mt. Baldy, which saw Frenchman Julian Alaphilippe take the win here in 2015.

His current teammate Marcel Kittel is expected to challenge six-time green jersey winner, Peter Sagan in the sprints. The race runs May 14-20, with a women’s four-stage race starting on the May 11 in Lake Tahoe.

Cascade Cycling Classic

The Cascade Cycling Classic enters it’s 38th year and holds the title as the longest running stage race in America.

This UCI 2.2 race mostly features elite riders and continental pros. The race itself is set against the backdrop of beautiful Mt. Bachelor in Bend, Oregon, featuring five-stages, with three challenging and climbing heavy road races from July 19-23.

Larry H. Miller Tour of Utah

Peloton riding neutral in Zion National Park, start of Stage 1.

The UCI 2.HC Larry H. Miller Tour of Utah is nicknamed “America’s Toughest Race” for good reason – it features nearly 50,000 feet of climbing over seven stages from July 31-August 6 in the 13th edition this year.

This race is often times a great opportunity for some of the American continental squads to contend against the larger European WorldTour teams looking to find fitness ahead of the Vuelta a España a few weeks later in the summer.

New this year, and following a stage two finish at nearly 7,000 feet, is a time trial up Big Cottonwood Canyon that should play an integral part in the final overall classification.

Colorado Classic

28 August 2011
1st USA Pro Cycling Challenge – Tour of Colorado
Photo : Yuzuru SUNADA

Looking to fill a void left by the cancelling of the USA Pro Cycling Challenge last year, the new Colorado Classic will be a four-day, ‘hub and spoke’ designed stage raced based out of Denver, Colorado.

There will be three circuit races and one out and back course with each stage finishing in the city of Denver. Exact course details have yet to be released for this race, running August 10-13 (with a women’s two-day race scheduled as well), but expect to see these courses feature plenty of climbing, taking advantage of Colorado’s mountainous terrain.


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Swimming Canada Names Teams for Worlds, WUGS & World Junior Champs

Photo Courtesy: Kevin Light/Swimming Canada

Swimming Canada has announced the roster of athletes that will represent their country at the summer’s three major international competitions: the FINA World Championships in Budapest (July 23-30), the World University Games in Taipei (Aug. 20-27) and the World Junior Championships in Indianapolis (Aug. 23-30).

All of these teams were selected based on performances at the Canadian Swimming Trials this past week in Victoria, and many athletes will compete at the World Championships and then turn around to head to either WUGs or World Junior Champs.

Below is the full list of athletes expected to head to Budapest. The strong squad, particularly on the women’s side, is led by individual Olympic medalists Kylie Masse and Penny Oleksiak.

Staff/Personnel

Last Name/

First Name/

 

Nom de famille

Prénom

 

Atkinson

John

Team Leader/Chef d’équipe

Wilby

Martyn

Head Coach

Perry

Mark

Head Coach – Open Water

Titley

Ben

Coach

St-Jean

Claude

Coach

Mallette

Ryan

Coach

Kiefer

Linda

Coach

Johnson

Tom

Coach

Pool Swimmers

Last Name/

First Name/

Club

Coach

Nom de famille

Prénom

 

 

Cote

Tristan

Etobicoke Swim Club

Blondal, Mike

McGregor

Ashley

Pointe-Claire Swim Club

Bultman, Steve

Pickrem

Sydney

Island Swimming Club

Bultman, Steve

Padington

Mackenzie

Island Swimming Club – NextGen Victoria

Dingey, Brad

Seltenreich-Hodgson

Erika

Greater Ottawa Kingfish Swim Club – HPC Vancouver

Johnson, Tom

Kisil

Yuri

UBC Dolphins Swim Club – HPC Vancouver

Johnson, Tom

Thormeyer

Markus

UBC Dolphins Swim Club – HPC Vancouver

Johnson, Tom

Olafson

Carson

UBC Dolphins Swim Club – HPC Vancouver

Johnson, Tom

Masse

Kylie

Windsor-Essex Swim Team

Kiefer, Linda

Smith

Kierra

Liquid Lightning Swim Club

Kremer, Kelly

Loginov

Alex

Toronto Swim Club

MacDonald, Byron

Caldwell

Hilary

Island Swimming Club – HPC Victoria

Mallette, Ryan

Bagshaw

Jeremy

Island Swimming Club – HPC Victoria

Mallette, Ryan

Harvey

Mary-Sophie

Neptune Natation

Rushton, Tom

Binnema

Josiah

Edmonton Keyano Swim Club

Schoof, Derrick

Nicol

Rachel

La Swim Club

Schori, Peter

Acevedo

Javier

Ajax Aquatic Club

Smith, Brian

Vanlandeghem

Chantal

Toronto Swim Club

Smith, Brian

Mainville

Sandrine

Club Aquatique Montreal

St-Jean, Claude

Savard

Katerine

Club Aquatique Montreal

St-Jean, Claude

Funk

Richard

Toronto Swim Club – HPC Ontario

Titley, Ben

Oleksiak

Penny

Toronto Swim Club – HPC Ontario

Titley, Ben

Toro

Michelle

North York Aquatic Club – HPC Ontario

Titley, Ben

Sanchez

Kayla

Ajax Aquatic Club – HPC Ontario

Titley, Ben

Smith

Rebecca

Scarborough Swim Club – HPC Ontario

Titley, Ben

Anderson

Olivia

Etobicoke Swim Club

Thorburn, Kevin

Open Water Swimmers

Dusablon

Jade

Club Aquatique Montreal

St-Jean, Claude

Guertin

Philippe

Club Aquatique Montreal

St-Jean, Claude

Siwicki

Breanne

Manta Swim Club

Hainey, Tom

Hedlin

Eric

Pacific Coast Swimming

Jacks, Ron

Horner

Stephanie

Pointe-Claire Swim Club

Jacks, Ron

Weinberger

Richard

Pacific Coast Swimming

Jacks, Ron

World University Games Roster

Last Name/ First Name/ Club Coach
Nom de famille Prénom    
Andison Bailey Perth Stingrays Aquatic Club Schrader, Brian
Bagshaw Jeremy Island Swimming Club – HPC Victoria Mallette, Ryan
Binnema Josiah Edmonton Keyano Swim Club Schoof, Derrick
Cote Tristan Etobicoke Swim Club Blondal, Mike
Darcel Sarah Island Swimming Club – HPC Victoria Mallette, Ryan
Dusablon Jade Club Aquatique Montreal St-Jean, Claude
Fournier Sarah C.N. Région de Québec Pelletier, Marc-Andre
Glover Mackenzie University Of Manitoba Bisons Swimming Holloway, Braden
Goss Kennedy Granite Gators Westphal, Mike
Guertin Philippe Club Aquatique Montreal St-Jean, Claude
Hanus Danielle Island Swimming Club – HPC Victoria Mallette, Ryan
Hedlin Eric Pacific Coast Swimming Jacks, Ron
Hill Rob Chena Swim Club Blondal, Mike
Keire Jacqueline Oakville Aquatic Club Disalle, Mandy
Loginov Alex Toronto Swim Club MacDonald, Byron
Ludlow Danica University Of Calgary Swim Club Blondal, Mike
Reilly Luke UBC Dolphins Swim Club – HPC Vancouver Johnson, Tom
Savard Katerine Club Aquatique Montreal St-Jean, Claude
Smith Kierra Liquid Lightning Swim Club Kremer, Kelly
Teghtsoonian Lauren Manta Swim Club Hainey, Tom
Thormeyer Markus UBC Dolphins Swim Club – HPC Vancouver Johnson, Tom
Wall Eli Toronto Swim Club Macdonald, Byron
Wog Kelsey University Of Manitoba Bisons Swimming Cerny, Vlastimil
Zevnik Alexia Pointe-Claire Swim Club Holloway, Braden

World Junior Championships Roster

Team Last Name, First Name Club Coach
1 GAZIEV, Ruslan Etobicoke Swim Club Kevin Thorburn
2 HANNAH, Jade Island Swimming Club/NextGen-VIC Brad Dingey
3 KNELSON, Faith Island Swimming Club/NextGen-VIC Brad Dingey
4 KWAN, Victoria Markham Aquatic Club Robert Novak
5 LEFRANC, Jaren Kisu Swim Club Tina Hoeben
6 MASTROMATTEO, Gabe Kenora Swimming Jenet Hyslop
7 OLEKSIAK, Penny Toronto Swim Club/HPC-ON Ben Titley
8 PAVICEVIC, Katja Toronto Swim Club Bill O’Toole
9 PRATT, Alexander Cascade Swim Club Dave Johnson
10 RUCK, Taylor Unattached Canada Kevin Zacher
11 SANCHEZ, Kayla Noelle Ajax Aquatic Club/HPC-ON Ben Titley
12 SMITH, Rebecca Scarborough Swim Club/HPC-ON Ben Titley
13 ZAVAROS, Mabel Oakville Aquatic Club Sean Baker
14 ZAVAROS, Rosie Oakville Aquatic Club Sean Baker

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Virginia Tech Adds In-State Talent Keith Myburgh to Class of 2021

Photo Courtesy: Keith Myburgh

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Keith Myburgh has committed to swim for Virginia Tech beginning in the fall. Myburgh is a USA Swimming Scholastic All-American. He attends Hidden Valley High School in Roanoke, VA. At this year’s 3A State Championship he won the 200 IM and 100 breaststroke.

He shared,

“When I visited the campus, the staff and coaches made me feel right at home. I cannot wait to spend the next four years of my academic and athletic career as a HOKIE!”

His best times are:

  • 200 IM 1:48.13
  • 400 IM 3:45.85
  • 100 Breast 54.80
  • 200 Breast 1:58.60

All four of those times were swum just last month at the 2017 FL Dolfin ISCA Junior Cup. In the past year Myburgh has knocked five seconds off his best 400 IM time. In 2016 Myburgh’s best 200 breaststroke time was a 2:07.31. He’s dropped an impressive nine seconds in that event. Given his recent progression, Myburgh could become a significant contributor for the Hokies.

His 400 IM time would have made him the team’s second fastest performer this year and placed sixth at ACCs. He also would have been a 200 breaststroke C finalist at the Conference Championship.

To report a verbal commitment email HS@swimmingworld.com.

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