How much money do the riders win in the 2017 Tour de France?

There is a total prize pot of €2,280,950 (£2,001,277) up for grabs at the 2017 Tour de France – here is how it is divided out

Just over £2million (€2,280,950) worth of prize money is on offer during the 2017 Tour de France, split up between the riders that place highly overall, stage winners, classification winners and more.

As you would rightly expect, winning the Tour de France overall nets you the biggest amount of money – and a significant portion of the overall prize pot.

>>> Tour de France 2017: Latest news, reports and info

The overall winner will receive €500,000 (£426,500) – the same as last year. Second place receives €200,000 and third gets €100,000. Money is paid out to riders who place between first and 160th, with those placing from 20th to 160th receiving €1,000 apiece.

Traditionally, the winner overall will share the prize money among their team, as a thanks for their team-mates help during the race.

The overall winner of the points and king of the mountains classifications will put €25,000 in their pockets, while the best young rider overall gets €20,000. Prizes are also given out to those that wear the classification jerseys each day, with €500 going to the wearer of the yellow jersey, and €300 going to the green, white and polka-dot wearers.

Prizes are awarded to those that wear the classification jerseys each day, as well as overall winners at the end of the race. Photo: Yuzuru Sunada

The top three riders home on each stage receive €11,000, €5,500 and €2,800, with money paid out to 20th position (€300).

There are also special prizes handed to riders who achieve certain targets during the race.

>>> 11 Tour de France rules you probably didn’t know

The first rider to the top of the Col du Galibier on stage 17 will get the €5,000 Souvenir Henri Desgrange. However, the €5,000 Souvenir Jacques Goddet will not be awarded this year as the race does not visit the Col du Tourmalet – and that means that this year’s total prize pot is slightly less than it was in 2016.



Money is paid out to riders positioning highly in each day’s intermediate sprint and categorised climb summits.

Especially aggressive riders are awarded each day with the combativity prize, which is €2,000 per day (excluding time trials and the final stage). The overall ‘super combativity’ prize winner nets €20,000 at the end of the race.

Last year, Team Sky and overall winner Chris Froome amassed €599,240 in prize money and topped the table of Tour cash. Cannondale-Drapac were bottom, and came away with only €14,100.


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Mavic’s Tour de France neutral service bikes get dropper seatposts for 2017

French brand introduce adaptability to deal with different rider saddle heights and pedal systems at the Tour

Mavic has been providing neutral service for the Tour de France and other major races for years. Usually that means supplying replacement wheels when a rider gets a flat and the team car is not close by.

But the distinctive yellow neutral service cars also carry spare bikes. Decked out in yellow to match the car, they’re not usually required, as riders will take a spare bike from their team car or, for GC riders, from another member of the team if they have a mechanical problem.

Chris Froome abandons a Mavic neutral service bike on Mont Ventoux after a crash (Sunada)

But this doesn’t always work out. And the most memorable instance of a rider suffering a problem without team support nearby was the chaotic stage 12 on Mont Ventoux in last year’s Tour.

Having damaged his bike in a crash with a camera motorbike and with no team support, Chris Froome took a bike from neutral service, only to find that it had the wrong pedal system and was much too small for his gangly form.

Unable to ride the bike, he took to foot to start running up the mountain.

Dropper seatpost height is adjusted using the plastic loop

Now Mavic has taken steps to avoid a repeat of such problems in the 2017 Tour. This year, it’s carrying a bike with each of the three major clipless pedal systems (Shimano, Look and Speedplay) on its cars, so that clipping in won’t be a problem.

And to accommodate different sized riders, its neutral service bikes now all have a dropper seatpost.

Made by US brand KS Suspension and based on its KS LEV Integra 272 design, the post has been specially adapted for Mavic’s requirements.



Mavic’s seatposts offer 65mm of travel and weigh 453g. The system is based on a mechanical and air adjustment, with a simple plastic loop to alter the saddle height.

>>> Mavic launches Izoard clothing collection for the Tour

Pulling on this while seated will lower the post, while without the rider’s weight, the release will let the saddle rise to its full extension. The saddle height is lockable at any position in between.

Mavic expects that this new approach will allow it to get a rider back on a bike as soon as possible, with fine-tuning of saddle height from the car once they are moving.


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Mavic Neutral Service bikes get dropper seatposts for 2017

More adaptability to deal with different rider saddle heights and pedal systems

Mavic has been providing neutral service for the Tour de France and other major races for years. Usually that means supplying replacement wheels when a rider gets a flat and the team car is not close by.

But the distinctive yellow neutral service cars also carry spare bikes. Decked out in yellow to match the car, they’re not usually required, as riders will take a spare bike from their team car or, for GC riders, from another member of the team if they have a mechanical problem.

This crash at the 2016 Tour de France forced Chris Froome to take a neutral service bike (Photo: Pool)

But this doesn’t always work out. And the most memorable instance of a rider suffering a problem without team support nearby was the chaotic Stage 12 on Mont Ventoux in last year’s Tour.

Having damaged his bike in a crash with a camera motorbike and with no team support, Chris Froome took a bike from neutral service, only to find that it had the wrong pedal system and was much too small for his gangly form. Unable to ride the bike, he took to foot to start running up the mountain.

Dropper seatpost height is adjusted using the plastic loop

Now Mavic has taken steps to avoid a repeat of such problems in the 2017 Tour. This year, it’s carrying a bike with each of the three major clipless pedal systems (Shimano, Look and Speedplay) on its cars, so that clipping in won’t be a problem.

And to accommodate different sized riders, its neutral service bikes now all have a dropper seatpost. Made by US brand KS Suspension and based on its KS LEV Integra 272 design, the post has been specially adapted for Mavic’s requirements.



Mavic’s seatposts offer 65mm of travel and weigh 453g. The system is based on a mechanical and air adjustment, with a simple plastic loop to alter the saddle height.

>>> Mavic launches Izoard clothing collection for the Tour

Pulling on this while seated will lower the post, while without the rider’s weight, the release will let the saddle rise to its full extension. The saddle height is lockable at any position in between.

Mavic expects that this new approach will allow it to get a rider back on a bike as soon as possible, with fine-tuning of saddle height from the car once they are moving.


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Who’s out of the Tour de France after stage three?

Keep up to date with who has withdrawn from this year’s Tour de France

With three weeks of racing and thousands of kilometres to cover, sporting events don’t come tougher than the Tour de France.

Last year’s race was notable for its lack of early withdrawals – all 198 starters made it to the start of stage eight – but a rainy Grand Départ in Düsseldorf, Germany, made for a very different start to the 2017 Tour.

What should have been a flat-out opening time trial instead turned into a battle against slippery road conditions, and there were some high-profile casualties as a result.

Spanish veteran Alejandro Valverde (Movistar) is the biggest name to retire so far, after he suffered a broken kneecap in a high-speed crash on a left-hand bend.

A key domestique for Nairo Quintana, the 37-year-old was even considered by some experts as an outside bet for the yellow jersey. But his hopes for the race were dashed in an instant when he came down, slid across the tarmac and hit a roadside barrier. He retired from the race immediately and looks set to miss the rest of the 2017 season.

Fellow Spaniard Ion Izagirre (Bahrain-Merida) crashed on the same bend as Valverde and also retired from the race, suffering a fracture to his lower back.

Luke Durbridge (Orica-Scott), who finished stage one despite crashing on the time trial, retired early in stage two. After his crash, the Australian’s team said they believed he had sustained ligament damage to his ankle and was cleared to start the following day – but was fairly swiftly forced to leave the race.


Watch highlights of stage two of the 2017 Tour de France


The race began on July 1 in Düsseldorf with 198 riders consisting of 22 teams of nine riders each.

Stage two abandonments

Luke Durbridge (Orica-Scott) – ankle ligament damage

Stage one abandonments

Ion Izagirre (Bahrain-Merida) – fracture to lower back
Alejandro Valverde (Movistar) – broken knee cap, broken ankle

This page will be updated as the race progresses


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The Running Form Episode!

elite runners

In this episode we talk running form with Jonathan Beverly author of the new book Your Best Stride -How to Optimize Your Natural Running Form to Run Easier, Farther, and Faster–With Fewer Injuries.

Jonathan BeverlyJonathan Beverly is the former editor in chief of Running Times and shoe editor for Runner’s World. He lives in western Nebraska, near the Colorado border, with his wife, Tracy, and son, Landis. He helps coach the high school cross country and track teams and can often be found running the dirt roads and grassy hills of the high plains.

Poetry in Motion

Also Mentioned In This Episode

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Health IQ -a life insurance company that celebrates marathon runners and other health conscious people. Visit healthiq.com/mta to learn more and get a free quote, or check out their life insurance FAQ page to get your questions answered. In addition, take the MTA quiz and see how you score!

About Angie Spencer

Angie is a registered nurse and running coach who empowers new runners to conquer the marathon, run faster, and take their health and fitness to the next level. Join the Academy

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Highlights of the i-Ride show, including Orro bikes, Birzman tools and Northwave shoes

With brands including De Rosa and Argon 18 as well as 3T and Fulcrum, there was a nice range of shiny new kit on display

Orro has been steadily expanding its range of bikes, with the latest being the Terra C gravel bike. It has a layer of Innegra built into key areas of the frame. Similar to Kevlar, this helps dissipate low level vibration from uneven surfaces.

There are three models in the Terra range. The £1799 model comes with Shimano 105 and TRP mechanical disc brakes, while the top spec model has Ultegra Hydro. There’s also an Adventure version with flared bars and high volume tyres. As with an increasing number of gravel bikes, you can fit 650b wheels and there are also rack and guard mounts. The alloy Terra continues, but gets a nice new translucent red finish.

New Orro Terra C has clearance for 650b wheels with chunky tyres (Photo: MBR/James Bracey)

Also new from Orro is an aero road bike. Disc only, there was a 3D printed prototype on display, which Orro plans to use for aero testing with the University of Southampton.

New aero bike will be disc brake only (Photo: MBR/James Bracey)

Orro’s Signature series is also expanding, with in-house painting to reduce customer waiting times and seven mechanics now working on bike builds. Dealers can bring customers to the Signature Atelier area for model and spec selection and bike fitting.

Argon 18 is speccing FSA WE groupsets on some of its machines (Photo: MBR/James Bracey)

Argon 18 had some of the first retail machines we’ve seen using the new FSA K-Force WE electronic groupset, while De Rosa had some new colour options and a reduction in price to £4249 for the Protos frameset.



Get into kit and there were new 2018 summer shoes from Northwave, while its winter boots now come with full Goretex liners. You can couple these up with De Feet’s increased sock range, including some for Cadence.

New Northwave road shoes come in novel colours (Photo: MBR/James Bracey)

We also saw helmets from Suomy, a new brand for i-Ride, and Birzman’s huge range of workshop and rider tools.


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Josh Schneider Announces Retirement In Facebook Post

Photo Courtesy: Peter H. Bick

Pan American Games gold medalist Josh Schneider announced his retirement from competitive swimming with a post on his Facebook page on Saturday.

Schneider made his breakthrough in 2010, when he became the first individual swimming national champion for Cincinnati when he won the 50 free. That same year he earned a spot representing the United States at the FINA World Short Course Championships in Dubai, where he won a gold medal as part of the 4 x 100 medley relay and an individual bronze in the 50 free.

Schneider would go on to represent the United States at the 2011 World University Games, the 2014 Short Course Worlds in Doha, and the 2015 Pan American Games in Canada, where he won a gold medal in the 50 freestyle. At the 2014 Short Course Worlds he was also a member of the world record setting mixed 200 freestyle relay.

Schneider finished fourth Olympic Trials in 2012 and was fifth just last summer, both times in the 50 freestyle. His last race was this weekend, where he finished 11th out of the heats of the 50 freestyle.

In Schneider’s Facebook post he thanks his family, USA Swimming, and his suit sponsor TYR while expressing his gratitude at being able to represent the United States internationally. You can read the full text Schneider’s full retirement message from his Facebook page below.

josh-schneider-retirement-2josh-schneider-retirement

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Tuesday – Herniated

  • Pain from a herniated disc is a complex personal experience. Physical and psychological factors are constantly changing and can contribute to a patient’s experience of pain. A herniated disc may not be painful at all times, or it may become even more painful because of psychological and other factors in the patient’s life. For example, many studies have established a correlation between back pain and depression.  The pain from a disc herniation also may become more severe when compounded with other physical problems in the spine, or situational factors (such as poor posture, sitting for a long period, etc).

 

Because of the complexities of understanding pain from a herniated disc, patients should not attempt to make their own diagnosis. An inaccurate self-diagnosis may lead to further damage to spinal structures or to more severe episodes of back pain or leg pain if the condition is left untreated or treated incorrectly. Working with a spine specialist helps ensure that the correct location of a herniated disc, extent of the problem and source of pain are identified early on.  

If any of you have any questions on what the neck or back problem might be or looking for suggestions or care feel free to call me!  Or ask me at CF!! 

 

Dr. Meghan

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Quickly Improving Backstroker Shannon Kearney Verbally Commits to NC State

Photo Courtesy: Shannon Kearney (Instagram)

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To report a college commitment, email HS@swimmingworld.com.
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NEW COMMIT: The NC State Wolfpack have added a verbal commitment from Shannon Kearney for the Class of 2022. Kearney is a backstroker at New Trier Swim Club in Illinois.

Kearney said in the announcement on her Instagram,

“I’m excited to announce my verbal commitment to pursue both my academic and athletic careers at North Carolina State University! This is an amazing opportunity and I can’t wait to be a part of the family! Go Pack!!”

Kearney will be a senior at Wilmette, Illinois’ Loyola Academy this fall. Swimming for her school, she was the 100 backstroke third place finisher at the 2016 Illinois High School state championship last fall.

Some of her best times are:

  • 50 Back 25.24
  • 100 Back 54.47
  • 200 Back 1:57.68
  • 50 Free 24.33
  • 100 Free 52.20

Kearney has seen significant improvement in the past year. Her best backstroke times were swum at NCSAs this March. Since 2017 she has knocked nearly eight tenths from her best 50 backstroke time. That’s small change compared to the full second that has come off her 100 time, and more remarkably the six seconds she has dropped from her best 200 backstroke a year ago. With that upward trajectory, Kearney could be a real difference maker for the Wolfpack. As her lifetime bests stand now, Kearney would have been a 200 backstroke B finalist and a 100 backstroke C finalist at the 2017 ACC Championships.

Emma Muzzy has also verbally committed to the Class of 2022.

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