Junior Morgan Miller Gives Virginia Tech First Verbal Commit to Class of 2023

Photo Courtesy: Morgan Miller

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NEW COMMIT: Morgan Miller of Poquoson, Virginia has proudly announced her verbal commitment to swim for Virginia Tech Hokies for the Class of 2023. Miller is a junior at Poquoson High School and swims year round for Coast Guard Blue Dolphins under Coach Jack Bierie.

During her sophomore short course season, she competed at Winter Junior’s and the ISCA Junior National Championship meets. Miller made finals and placed at both meets with significant time improvements. Miller’s long course season proved to be steps towards the future. Miller swam at the East Coast Futures LC Meet in Geneva Ohio swimming best times in 200 free, back, fly, IM; as well in the 100 fly. Miller had 3 top 8 finishes and qualified herself for her for first Summer Juniors and Winter National meets. Miller plans to swim her first High School Swim Season this year. As a junior, Miller is sitting right outside of scoring at ACC’s.

Short Course Times (LCM)

  • 200 Free 1:49.72 (2:04.38)
  • 200 Back 1:59.52 (2:22.03)
  • 100 Fly 56.36 (1:02.95)
  • 200 Fly 2:01.66 (2:16.89)
  • 200 IM 2:03.94 (2:23.59)

“I’m so honored to be the “First Commitment” for Virginia Tech Class of 2023! I felt instantly at home and welcomed by the coaches and team. I believe that Virginia Tech will provide me the environment to be successful in my academics and swimming. I want to thank my parents for always supporting me and to my coaches that have helped throughout my swimming process. Thank you to Coach Ned Skinner and Coach Josh Huger for an awesome recruiting experience and giving me an opportunity to be part of the momentum of this Hokie Family.”

Morgan Miller contributed this report.

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Division II Weekly Recap: Queens Reigns Supreme

Photo Courtesy: Queens Athletics

The last October weekend of the year featured a few of the top ten Division II teams in action as (#1/2) Queens had an easy win over conference rival (#8/5) Wingate in a unique meet setup. The two teams swam each other, but in different locations. The Wingate women hosted their in-state conference rival Queens on Friday night in a women’s only meet. The Royals from Queens won that matchup 181-64.

On Saturday, Queens hosted the Wingate men in a men’s only meet. The coaches wanted it this way as a means of getting both campuses involved in the rivalry meet. The Queens men won that matchup as well 166-79.

Francesca Bains was one of the stars of the day with her win in the 1000 at 10:16.80, to rank second in the Division II national rankings in that event. Bains is behind Nova Southeast’s Emma Sundstedt (10:13.44) in Division II swimming rankings.

Queens’ Sarah Atkinson won the 200 breast to put up the second fastest time in the country this year at 2:18.75. Atkinson is just a freshman and is sitting behind Drury stud Bailee Nunn in the national rankings as both of those girls are the only ones who have been 2:18 in Division II this season.

Junior Josephina Lorda also had a big day with a win in the 200 fly (2:04.39) and the 200 free (1:52.97). Her 200 fly time puts her third in the national rankings as her teammate McKenzie Stevens is first. Stevens only swam one individual event against Wingate and that was the 200 free where she placed third (1:55.71).

Wingate was highlighted by junior Ebba Stillman who won the 100 fly (56.27) and was second in the 200 fly (2:05.79). Those are her season best times as she is fifth nationally in both those events.

The Drury men and women dropped their duel meets with Missouri State as the women fell 135-107 and the men 144-87.

A few bright spots came from Bailee Nunn as she won the 200 IM (2:01.20), the 200 fly (2:02.51) and the 200 breast (2:18.86). Nunn’s 200 IM was the most impressive as she sky-rocketed to the number one time in Division II with that swim. She is well ahead of second place Maggie Melhorn (2:06.12) of Carson Newman. Nunn also ranks second in the 200 fly behind the aforementioned Stevens. Her 200 breast didn’t improve on her 2:18.32 that already leads the nation from the Division II Fall Showcase last week.

The Drury men were highlighted by Joan Casanovas who won the 500 at 4:33.99. He is still leading Division II in the event with his 4:31.07 from last week.

Both teams from Drury swam a little off against Missouri State, but the women did win both relays and the men won the final 400 free relay with the second fastest time in the nation this year. Pavel Semochkin, Casanovas, Aitor Martinez and Rodrigo Caceres swam a 3:02.09 to sit just behind Queens (3:01.54) in the national rankings. Queens did that in their win over Wingate on Saturday.

In fact, Queens and Wingate only swam the 400 free relay as they led off the meet with the 100 back, instead of a usual medley relay. Queens swam the fastest 400 free relay in the country with Marius KuschAlen MosicDmytro Sydorchenko and Ben Mayes.

The Royals continued their strong season with Kusch being the star on Saturday. Kusch swam a 46.95 100 fly to go past teammate Paul Pijulet in the national rankings. Pijulet had the top spot from his 47.94 last weekend. Kusch also won the 200 fly with an ironically identical time of 1:46.95 as he is well ahead of second place Magnus Poulsen (1:50.07) of Nova Southeast. To end his dominating day, Kusch led off the 400 free relay with a 44.37, the fastest time in the nation in Division II this season.

Queens also had dominating performances from Nick Arakelian in the 200 IM (1:49.36) as he leads the national rankings ahead of Indianapolis’ Rodrigo Codo Berti (1:51.86). Arakelian also won the 100 breast (55.27) as he is second nationally in that event. Paul Pijulet put up the nation’s quickest 100 back time with a 48.19 just ahead of Delta State’s Giulio Brugnoni (48.53) as the latter swam that against Georgia Tech this weekend. Brugnoni also swam a 48.99 in the 100 fly to rank fourth in Division II.

Speaking of Delta State, Lucia Martelli swam the fastest 100 fly in the nation this past weekend at 55.20 to continue her strong freshman campaign. Martelli also swam the 200 fly with a 2:06.19.

Other notable performances on the weekend came from UC San Diego’s Tenny Chong in the 200 back (1:50.70), Fresno Pacific’s Maksim Shcherbakov in both breast events (56.53, 2:03.08), and Aleksei Averchenko in the 100 fly (49.45) and Wingate’s Sebastian Holmberg in the 200 IM (1:52.65).

Other of note performances for the women came from Fresno Pacific’s Laura Fornshell in the 200 free (1:52.77) and 500 free (4:58.78). Fornshell is the second swimmer in Division II to break five minutes in the 500 this season. UC San Diego’s Kaitlyn Richey in the 1000 (10:27.45) and Rachel Taylor in the 200 breast (2:19.53), LIU Post’s Laura Bendfeldt in the 100 back (57.53) and Karis Fuller in the 200 back (2:04.57), Fresno Pacific’s Daria Belova in the 100 fly (55.76) and Bavindeep Basra in the 400 IM (4:26.28), and CSU East Bay’s Morgan McClure in the 200 IM (2:06.47) also had noteworthy swims this past weekend.

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Nick Cavic Again on Fire Sunday at Swimming World Fall Classic

Photo Courtesy: David Rieder

During the Sunday afternoon session at the Swimming World Fall Classic in Bristol, R.I., Bluefish’s Nick Cavic posted four wins in the 10-and-under division, and prelims were contested for 11-12 events.

Cavic won the 10-and-under boys’ 100 breast in 1:20.34, the 50 fly in 29.97, the 100 free in 1:00.46 and 50 back in 32.33.

Cavic’s teammate Alex Parent won the 200 free in 2:30.44, and another Bluefish swimmer, Zuri Ferguson, posted three wins in the girls’ 10-and-under age group, touching first in the 50 fly (30.11), 100 free (1:00.46) and 50 back (30.63).

For the Infinity Swim Club, Izzy Balboni won the 10-and-under girls’ 200 free (2:16.19), and teammate Jasmine Blay won the 100 breast (1:22.06).

Qualifying was also held in the 12-and-under age group, where Bluefish’s James Misto qualified first in the 200 free, 100 free and 100 back.

Misto, along with all the other 12-and-under winners from Saturday (Matthew WaldenTom KiesewetterDebbie WellsOlivia ShengMya Faulkner and Gwen Balboni) will be in action in Sunday evening’s finals, streamed live on Swimming World TV at 6:15 p.m. ET.

Full results

Check out the full playlist of Sunday afternoon’s videos below. Click on the icon in the top left-hand corner to find a list and pick which race you want to watch.

Part One:

Part Two:

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Dan Evans becomes national hill-climb champion for second time; Joscelin Lowden takes maiden women’s title

Dan Evans and Joscelin Lowden powered to victory at the 2017 RTTC National Hill-Climb Championships in Hedley-on-the-Hill, Northumberland

Dan Evans (ASSOS-Equipe UK) stormed to a convincing victory in the 2017 National Hill-Climb Championships in Northumberland on Sunday, beating defending champion Adam Kenway (Raleigh-GAC) by more than five seconds.

Joscelin Lowden (Lewis Wanderers) claimed the women’s title, just over a second faster than Mary Wilkinson (Yorkshire RC) and two seconds quicker than pre-race favourite Hayley Simmonds (Team WNT).

The 1,572m course, which averages 7.5 per cent, was completed in 3-54.3 by Evans, seven hundredth seconds inside his target. His win, allied to his 2014 title, makes him the first rider since Dan Fleeman in 2009 and 2010 to win multiple titles in the discipline.

>>> Dan Evans’s super-slimmed down Cannondale hill-climb bike

A bitterly cold but bright day in Northumberland saw hundreds line the twisting course, and they watched as Keiran Savage (Team B38/Underpin Racing) rode to third, Joe Clark (Sheffield Giant) to fourth and Leon Wright (Race Hub) to fifth.

“In 2014, it didn’t really hit me what I had done when I won it,” Evans, 36, told Cycling Weekly. “This feels different. The [hill-climb] scene has got bigger. I appreciate it a bit more now that I have had two years of not winning it, but coming close, especially in 2015 [when he finished second to Richard Bussell].

“We had all the best guys here today: Adam, Joe, Kieran, Andy Cunningham. To win it like I have today I am really happy.”

The climb – which was decorated with chalk markings encouraging riders to “smile” but then also reminding them that “yes, it hurts” – ramped up to its steepest sections at the mid-way mark, when a left turn was followed by a hairpin bend.

>>> ‘I wasn’t really going for it’: Hill climber’s huge power completely destroys crankset

It was before the toughest gradients where Evans believes he put the most time into Kenway and his rivals. “I think I probably won it from the start to the first hairpin,” he reflected.

“That’s where I put a lot of time into everyone. What I can do different to a lot of the guys is that I can go really fast at first and not pay for it too much; I can hang on and maintain myself.”

With defending women’s champion Lou Bates not racing, there was always going to be a new female champion. Many expected Simmonds to conquer the hill, but it was Lowden who was the quickest, ending only her second season of racing in national glory.

“I knew that if I put in a really good ride, I would be in with a really good chance of winning it,” she said. I knew it was going to be really tough competition. There were loads of girls doing so well in the run-up, that if I didn’t win it, it would be because I was properly beaten. I’m pleased.

“I thought I would get ten seconds faster, to be honest. But I obviously completely overestimated it.”


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Dan Evans become national hill-climb champion for second time; Joscelin Lowden takes maiden women’s title

Dan Evans and Joscelin Lowden powered to victory at the 2017 RTTC National Hill-Climb Championships in Hedley-on-the-Hill, Northumberland.

Dan Evans (ASSOS-Equipe UK) stormed to a convincing victory in the 2017 National Hill-Climb Championships in Northumberland on Sunday, beating defending champion Adam Kenway (Raleigh-GAC) by more than five seconds.

Joscelin Lowden (Lewis Wanderers) claimed the women’s title, just over a second faster than Mary Wilkinson (Yorkshire RC) and two seconds quicker than pre-race favourite Hayley Simmonds (Team WNT).

The 1,572m course, which averages 7.5 percent, was completed in 3:54.3 by Evans, seven hundredth seconds inside his target. His win, allied to his 2014 title, makes him the first rider since Dan Fleeman in 2009 and 2010 to win multiple titles in the discipline.

>>> Dan Evans’s super-slimmed down Cannondale hill-climb bike

A bitterly cold but bright day in Northumberland saw hundreds line the twisting course, and they watched as Keiran Savage (Team B38/Underpin Racing) rode to third, Joe Clark (Sheffield Giant) to fourth and Leon Wright (Race Hub) to fifth.

“In 2014, it didn’t really hit me what I had done when I won it,” Evans, 36, told Cycling Weekly. “This feels different. The [hill-climb] scene has got bigger. I appreciate it a bit more now that I have had two years of not winning it, but coming close, especially in 2015 [when he finished second to Richard Bussell].

“We had all the best guys here today: Adam, Joe, Kieran, Andy Cunningham. To win it like I have today I am really happy.”

The climb – which was decorated with chalk markings encouraging riders to “smile” but then also reminding them that “yes, it hurts” – ramped up to its steepest sections at the mid-way mark, when a left turn was followed by a hairpin bend.

>>> ‘I wasn’t really going for it’: Hill climber’s huge power completely destroys crankset

It was before the toughest gradients where Evans believes he put the most time into Kenway and his rivals. “I think I probably won it from the start to the first hairpin,” he reflected.

“That’s where I put a lot of time into everyone. What I can do different to a lot of the guys is that I can go really fast at first and not pay for it too much; I can hang on and maintain myself.”

With defending women’s champion Lou Bates not racing, there was always going to be a new female champion. Many expected Simmonds to conquer the hill, but it was Lowden who was the quickest, ending only her second season of racing in national glory.

“I knew that if I put in a really good ride, I would be in with a really good chance of winning it,” she said. I knew it was going to be really tough competition. There were loads of girls doing so well in the run-up, that if I didn’t win it, it would be because I was properly beaten. I’m pleased.

“I thought I would get ten seconds faster, to be honest. But I obviously completely overestimated it.”


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Colorado Freestyler Lukas Gately Verbally Commits to Denison University

Photo Courtesy: Lukas Gately

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NEW COMMIT: Lukas Gately has verbally committed to long time Division III power house Denison University. Gately hails from Berthoud, Colorado where he swims for Loveland Swim Club. He is a senior at Thompson Valley High School.

A distance freestyler, Gately’s top times include:

  • 1650 Free 16:09.50
  • 1000 Free 9:34.92
  • 500 Free 4:43.88
  • 200 Free 1:48.53

He said of his decision,

“Denison offers unique and excellent opportunities both academically and in the pool. With a fantastic coaching staff and an incredibly devoted team atmosphere, I felt that the school would be a perfect fit for me. I’m greatly looking forward to supplementing my academic and athletic abilities in my next four years here. Go Big Red!”

At last spring’s Colorado 4A Boys High School state championship Gately was ninth in the 200 IM (2:02.19) and eighth in the 500 free (4:51.66). He also anchored Thompson Valley’s eighth place 200 freestyle relay and swam the second leg of the runner up 400 freestyle relay.

Denison won last year’s North Coast Athletic Conference Championships. Gately’s best 1650 freestyle time would have been good for seventh at last year’s Championships. Big Red sophomore Matthew Hedman was second (15:40.04) in the event. He’ll overlap with Gately for a year as will Jackson Berman (16:02.21), Ryan Anderson (16:19.73), and Oliver WAldram (16:27.47) who all swam exhibition. Also swimming exhibition was James Baker (15:55.58), who should be a good training partner for Gately for two years.

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Swiss Indoors: Roger Federer beats Juan Martin del Potro to win his eighth Basel title

Roger Federer

Switzerland’s Roger Federer beat Argentine Juan Martin Del Potro to win the Swiss Indoors and close the gap on world number one Rafael Nadal.

Federer’s 6-7 (5-7) 6-4 6-3 win moves him within 1,460 points of the Spaniard ahead of next week’s Paris Masters, the final regular-season event.

The 36-year-old claimed an eighth crown in Basel and his seventh title of 2017.

Victory for Del Potro would have moved him into the final qualifying place for the ATP finals in London.

Having won in Stockholm last week, the world number 19 was targeting back-to-back titles in Basel but it was not to be for the 29-year-old, who remains one place behind Spain’s Pablo Carreno Busta.

Del Potro must reach at least the semi-finals in Paris to claim the final spot.

In Vienna, Frenchman Lucas Pouille secured a comfortable 6-1 6-4 victory over his French compatriot Jo Wilfried-Tsonga to claim his third title of the season.

Tsonga, another contender for the finals in London, is now 295 points behind Carreno Busta with the two remaining places to be decided in the Paris.

Federer shows frustration

Federer and Del Potro had met on four previous occasions in 2017, with the latter winning their last meeting the US Open quarter-finals last month.

In a tight opening set, Federer had the chance to take it on serve, only for Del Potro to break, and the Swiss player then lost five points in a row to surrender the tie-break.

Federer’s frustrations came to a head in the fourth game of the second set when he blew the chance to stamp his authority back on the match.

The 19-time Grand Slam champion carved out a break point and took control of the rally at 30-40, only to send a simple backhand volley wide.

It triggered an angry outburst as Federer smashed his racquet into the net in a rare show of emotion.

However, he regained his composure to break in the final game of the set, before wrapping up the victory with two further breaks in the third.

Federer now has 95 career titles, with Jimmy Connors leading the all-time list on 109.

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Olympic Trials Finalist Emily Cameron Now Aiming Big in Triathlon

Photo Courtesy: Emily Cameron

By David Rieder.

At her final NCAA championships in 2017, Emily Cameron swam in the consolation finals of both IM events and was the breaststroker on Georgia’s medley relays. She had been a part of two national championship-winning Georgia teams (in 2014 and 2016), and she was a finalist in the 200 IM at the 2016 Olympic Trials, but with her college career over, she was finished in the pool.

“I feel like with swimming I reached my highest potential, and I couldn’t be more grateful for the goals that I achieved. I surprised myself for sure,” Cameron said.

“With that being said, I don’t think that I reached my full potential athletically.”

emily cameron

Photo Courtesy: Cory A. Cole

Before she built a career as one of the country’s top IM swimmers, Cameron had run cross country in high school, and both her parents had been runners. So during her senior year, the idea crossed her mind that she could attempt triathlons.

What sold her on the plan? Time away from—quite literally—everything.

During the summer of 2017, Cameron and her mother completed a 500-mile trek through Europe. For almost six weeks, she was disconnected from the rest of the world, and that gave her time and space to chew on where she was in her life and what she wanted to do.

“I really just had a chance to reflect on my career in the pool,” she said. “I knew that as soon as I got back, I wanted to jump head-first into my training for triathlon and just get out there and race because I had really missed that desire to compete. I knew it was still within me, and I wanted to bring it out again, just in a different area.”

So when she returned to Athens, Ga., for her fifth and final year of college, she resumed full-time training, but the program was much different than what she had done for four years with Jack Bauerle and the Bulldogs’ swim team.

As part of USA Triathlon’s College Recruitment Program, Cameron was assigned an individualized coach who would create her workouts and communicate regularly. While she’s found it fairly easy to get back into “at least decent swimming shape,” getting back into her running groove and getting comfortable on the bike have been a bit more challenging.

Cameron estimates that she does 80 percent of her training by herself. On occasion, she will still swim with the Georgia team or find groups to run or bike with, but she insists she doesn’t mind training solo.

Why? Because she’s pursuing triathlon for one reason: passion.

“I’m self-motivated completely,” Cameron said. “This is all because I want to do this and not because I’m here on a scholarship or I owe somebody something. This is completely for me. If the drive and motivation is there for yourself, I think that’s huge, and I think there’s more to give there.”

Since returning from Europe, Cameron has already raced four triathlons. Most recently, she finished second at the NCAA East Regional Qualifier in Sarasota, Fla., on Oct. 7. That qualified her to compete in the NCAA Triathlon National Championship on Nov. 5 in Tempe, Ariz.

emily cameron

Photo Courtesy: Emily Cameron

So far, Cameron has exclusively raced sprint triathlons: 750-meter swim, 20-kilometer bike and five-kilometer run. The races take just over an hour to complete, and the swimming is the quickest of the segments. In the regional race, Cameron completed her swim in just over nine minutes.

Still, even though swimming is such a small part of a triathlon, Cameron explained that coming from a swimming background provides her with a huge advantage. She typically tries to break away from her competitors without a swimming background during that portion of the race.

“You need to have a pretty darn good swim to even contend for a high placement in these races because that’s what’s going to get you in the lead pack with the bike,” she said. “It all begins with your base in swimming, and if it’s good, you’re on the right path.”

The recent history of swimmers transforming themselves into elite triathletes includes the name Gwen Jorgensen, who swam and ran during her college days at the University of Wisconsin before turning her attention to triathlons. In the Olympic triathlon last year in Rio, Jorgensen won Olympic gold.

And even though she is a complete novice to the sport, Cameron aspires to reach that elite level. She plans on attempting her first Olympic-distance triathlon—double the length of the sprint version—in the coming months.

Next fall, Cameron hopes to be accepted into a resident program with USA Triathlon where she would train full-time. With graduation from Georgia on the horizon in May, she has begun applying to graduate school programs, but if she is offered a spot in the USA Triathlon program, she would not turn that down.

“I think I would jump at the opportunity because I don’t know how many times it’s going to come around for me in the future,” she said. “If there’s potential that shows that I have the ability to become an elite triathlete, then I’m going to pursue that dream.”

How realistic is that dream? Cameron doesn’t know yet, but she expects to figure out exactly where she stands soon enough, within the next year to two years.

“The field is really, really deep right now with female triathletes, so realistically I’d say 2024 is more the goal,” Cameron said. “I’m excited to get out there and race with people who’ve been around the sport for years, and I can really just get some wisdom from then and learn from them.”

Cameron has spent the last several years living among athletes who are the best in the world at what they do at Georgia—including her roommate and best friend Olivia Smoliga, who was an Olympic gold medalist in the pool in Rio.

emily cameron

Photo Courtesy: Emily Cameron

Watching her friends taste success at the highest level in sport made Cameron eager to take on a challenge like triathlon—to commit herself to a sport she had never tried before and try to reach that elite status that she knew was out of reach for her in swimming.

“I knew that I was great at swimming and I am so thankful for how much that I accomplished,” Cameron said. “But I think there was a part of me that still wanted to reach the same level that my teammates have, just maybe not in the pool.”

And Cameron is wholeheartedly committed to pursuing excellence in triathlon.

“100 percent. Absolutely.”

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Wozniacki beats Williams to win WTA Finals

Caroline Wozniacki

Denmark’s Caroline Wozniacki beat Venus Williams to claim the biggest title of her career at the WTA Finals in Singapore.

Williams – at 37, the oldest woman to ever reach the final – lost 6-4 6-4.

After a tight first set, number six seed Wozniacki stormed into a 5-0 lead in the second.

Williams then won four straight games but Wozniacki, 27, converted her second Championship point to beat the American for the first time.

“It feels amazing, I can’t believe I am here as the winner,” she told BT Sport.

“Venus Williams is a great champion and she made it very, very difficult for me. This is my biggest title to date.”

More to follow.

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Sunday trading: 48% off Shimano Ultegra 6800 and great deals on Castelli kit

Revamp your wardrobe and give your bike some love with some of these wicked deals from the likes of Wiggle, Chain Reaction Cycles, Evans Cycles and many more

Another Sunday, another set of banger bargains ready for your enjoyment.

Get stuck in!

Want more deals? Then check out: 

Shimano Ultegra 6800 was £952, now £499

Read more: Shimano Ultegra 6800 review

Shimano Ultegra 6800 is the older model following the release of the 8000 series, but that doesn’t make it any less excellent.

The Ultegra level is the bread and butter for cyclists – with loads of the Shimano Dura-Ace technology jammed into a lower price point.

Buy now: Shimano Ultegra 6800 at Chain Reaction cycles for £499

Gore Bike Wear Xenon 2.0 bib short was £159, now £95

These could be a great pair of shorts to have lying in wait for when the weather warms up again – especially now they’re 40% off.

They’re windproof and tight fitting for muscle support, and have a comfy chamois to eat up the miles on.

Buy now: Gore Bike Wear Xenon 2.0 bib short at Evans Cycles for £95

Castelli Superleggera jacket was £90, now £53

The Castelli Superleggera is a super lightweight, packable and completely windproof jacket that’s finished with a water resistant coating.

It’s a great option to have in your back pocket should things turn nasty, and now it’s as low as £53.

Buy now: Castelli Superleggera jacket at Evans Cycles for £53

Castelli Perfetto Convertible jacket was £210, now £109

The Castelli Perfetto is made for seriously foul weather rides, and it’s handles them a charm. It’s windproof, excellently waterproof and very warm.

This model is convertible, too, meaning it suits a wider range of weather conditions.

Buy now: Castelli Perfetto Convertible jacket at Tweeks Cycles for £109

More tidy deals:

Cateye Volt 1600 – £159£127

Kryptonite keeper 785 lock – £34.00£20

Cycleops Mag+ trainer – £164 – £129.49

Altura Ultralite Packable panniers – £65 – £48.48

Garmin Edge 1000 – £499 – £395

Park Tool BB30 bearing tool set – £49.99 – £31.00

Polar V650 with heart rate monitor – £229 – £188

Shimano 105 pedals – £109 – £62

Bell Stratus helmet – £99 – £59

Garmin Edge 20 £109 – £84.48

Shimano Dura-Ace 9100 crankset £499 – £324

Giro Peloton cycling cap £24.99 – £14.99

Specialized women’s Pro SL bib short £139.99 – £83.99

Specialized Elasticised shoe cover £29.99 – £9.90

Shimano Ultegra 6800 compact chain set £249.99 £159.99

Look Keo grip cleats – £20.99 – £9.99

Mavic Cosmic Pro carbon wheelset – £875 – £787.50

Louis Garneau knee warmers – £19.99 – £15.99

That’s all for this week, be sure to check back next week for more great deals.


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