Photo Gallery: Day 3 Prelims of 2017 FINA World Championships

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Day three prelims of the 2017 FINA World Championships played host to only four events: men’s 50 breast, women’s 200 free, men’s 200 fly, and men’s 800 free.

The morning jumped to a blazing start as Adam Peaty bested his own world and championship records in the men’s 50 breast. Federica Pellegrini edged Katie Ledecky for the top seed going into semi-finals of the women’s 200 free and Laszlo Cseh powered to a top seed in the men’s 200 fly in front of a roaring home crowd.

SIPA USA was on deck throughout the session capturing all of the action and excitement.

Day 3 Prelims Photo Gallery:

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Heat Sheets Available for Day 3 Finals of Worlds; No Scratches

Heat sheets are now available for the finals session of day three of the 2017 FINA World Championships.

Schedule of Events:

  • Men’s 200 Free FINAL
  • Women’s 1500 Free FINAL
  • Men’s 50 Breast Semi-Final
  • Women’s 100 Back FINAL
  • Men’s 100 Back FINAL
  • Women’s 200 Free Semi-Final
  • Men’s 200 Fly Semi-Final
  • Women’s 100 Breast FINAL

DAY 3 FINALS HEAT SHEETS

The British duo of James Guy and Duncan Scott will aim for a 1-2 finish in the men’s 200 free, as they enter tonight’s final as the top two seeds. China’s Sun Yangb and the USA’s Townley Haas will also be in the running for medal contention.

Katie Ledecky of the USA will charge towards her second individual gold medal of the meet in the finals of the women’s 1500 free. She is seeded close to 18 seconds ahead of the competition, so her biggest competition will be her own world record of 15:25.48. Ledecky will follow up her 1500 free later as the second place seed in the 200 free, behind Italy’s Federica Pellegrini.

Both the men’s and women’s 100 back final will be contested with USA athletes in medal contention for both. The world record could be in jeopardy for both events as Kylie Masse flirted with the women’s WR on day two and the men’s final will feature Ryan Murphy, the current WR holder, and Xu Jiayu, who has landed within striking range of the WR.

Laszlo Cseh leads the men’s 200 fly semi-final heats, joined by top athletes Daiya Seto, Chad le Clos, Viktor Bromer, and more!

The evening will conclude with one final 100 breast show-off between the USA’s Lilly King and Russia’s Yulia Efimova. Efimova gave the world record a scare during semi-finals, landing within .01 seconds of Lithuania’s Ruta Meilutyte’s world record.

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Chris Froome beaten into second in post-Tour criterium; still wins big hat and bigger beer

Froome leaves his sprint at home at post-Tour crit

Less than 24 hours after crossing the line on the Champs-Élysées to win his fourth Tour de France, Chris Froome was in the slightly less glamourous surroundings of Aalst, Belgium for the first of the traditional post-Tour criteriums.

Having enjoyed a victory party in Paris on Sunday night, hot-footed it to the UK for an interview with Sky Sports on Monday morning, then made it back across the Channel for the race on Monday evening, Froome might not have been at his best, but still, somehow, managed to make it into the winning break with Belgian champion Oliver Naesen and Thomas De Gendt.

>>> Chris Froome conformed for Vuelta a España on back of Tour de France victory

No doubt the organisers were very pleased to see three such high-profile riders at the front of their race, with Naesen defeating Froome, resplendent in his yellow jersey, in the final sprint for the line.

The good news for all three riders was that they all received the same fine prizes on the podium. Namely a giant hat courtesy of race sponsor Napoleon Games, and a good few litres of Malheur beer. Perfect preparation for the start of Froome’s assault on the Vuelta.


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FINA World Championships Top Quotes: Day Two

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Check out quotes and audio interviews from athletes who posted impressive performances on the second day of the 2017 FINA World Championships in Budapest, Hungary!

“I’m still 1.5 seconds ahead of the rest of the world. I’m very happy with that. It’s not the time—it’s the way I did it. It’s the 26.5 that looks promising to me. Not many people can go out in 26.5 and come back. Nobody but me has been under 26.6 in the 50. The way I swam it is very encouraging for the future.” — Adam Peaty (GBR), on not breaking the world record in 100 breast (gold, 57.47 CR)

“I just find the Great British flag very motivating. As soon as I look at that in the crowd, it’s game-time.” — Peaty, on his motivation one year after the Olympic Games



“I didn’t get to swim it in ’15, so I’m definitely excited to start off the meet like this. It builds a lot of confidence, definitely coming off the Olympic year.”Kevin Cordes (USA), on winning his first major international medal in the 100 breast (silver, 58.79)


“I didn’t know what to expect today—I was very tired after my four races yesterday on the first day. It’s hard to know how the feeling was today. I was very excited before the race, and I couldn’t wait to start. It felt like the last 10 minutes before the race were going on forever.” Sarah Sjostrom (SWE), after women’s 100 fly final (gold, 55.53 CR)

I was hoping for a time under 52, but I did not think I was going to be that much under. It felt so good yesterday in the first leg in the relay. I guess it’s a bit easier when you go for the world record in the relay instead of going for the world record in the World Championship final.” — Sjostrom, on her 100 free WR leading off 400 free relay (51.71)


“It’s just incredible. I’ve been just praying so much after last summer. That was really stressful last night in the semi-final. I knew I had what it takes, but after being ninth last year, it was really hard… I’m just really grateful to have gotten my hand on the wall third.” — Kelsi Worrell (USA), after women’s 100 fly final (bronze, 56.37)


“I think overall I can’t really complain. The race is over—I can’t change anything… I think that this year’s been kind of tough with injuries and everything. It’s not the best year that I could have had, but considering I could still come fourth at Worlds, I’m pretty happy with myself.” — Penny Oleksiak (CAN), after women’s 100 fly final (fourth, 56.94)


“It’s not much different than last year. It’s always good to have competition.” — Ryan Murphy (USA), on Xu Jiayu qualifying first for men’s 100 back final


“You don’t really want to put yourself in the game mentally every time, especially if it’s a longer meet with relays and 50s and stuff… (In the final), just let the natural routine take over. Get excited, focus, picture the perfect race over and over, and come out here and execute it.” — Matt Grevers (USA), after men’s 100 back semi-final (qualified third, 52.97)


“This is my first Worlds final as it is. I’m excited to race these guys who have been world record-holders.”Grigory Tarasevich (RUS), after men’s 100 back semi-final (qualified fifth, 53.06)

“I’m their teammate everywhere. Watching them here is very exciting for me… If they can go fast, then I can go fast. I’ve been training with them.” — Tarasevich, on Louisville teammates Worrell and Mallory Comerford winning medals


“I went a best time by a half-second. I think I have a little bit left in the tank yet. I haven’t shaved yet.” — Lilly King (USA), after 100 breast semi-final (qualified second, 1:04.53)

“I always look at the results of the previous heat. I saw the finger wag. It just motivates me.” — King, on Yulia Efimova’s 1:04.36 in the previous 100 breast heat


“Obviously it’s an amazing time. I saw her the last five meters, and I was hoping she was going fast because that would mean I was going fast, too.” — Katie Meili (USA), on Efimova’s swim in 100 breast semi-final (Meili qualified fourth, 1:05.48).


“I think 15 meters out I lost my tempo. You can’t make mistakes in the 50. I made one, and I paid for it.” — Caeleb Dressel (USA), after men’s 50 fly final (fourth, 22.89)


The 100 is such a quick race, and the smallest things can sometimes hinder or improve… I think if I go out the same 50 speed and just work on my last 50 and my last 15 into the wall, maybe that would help. — Kylie Masse (CAN), on her continued pursuit of the 100 back world record (qualified first for finals, 58.18)


“It’s been there for so long, so it’d be good to see it go.” — Emily Seebohm (AUS), on Masse almost breaking 100 back WR (Seebohm qualified second, 58.85)


“I’ve always been a 200 swimmer. I had that (100 free) individual swim in Rio last year, so that became slightly more of the focus. In 2014, I broke onto that Scottish team, and in 2015 in Kazan, it’s always been the 200 free in that perspective of things, and that’s what I train for, so I’m delighted that it’s come through.” — Duncan Scott (GBR), after men’s 200 free semi-finals (qualified first, 1:45.16)


“I’ll probably warm down a lot, and I’ll probably warm up a little bit more tomorrow.”Townley Haas (USA), on how he will improve from 200 free semi-finals (qualified fourth, 1:45.43)


“I know I’m always behind the front half of the race. I just had to keep my head in the game, know what my plan for the race was, stick to it and keep on pushing as hard as I could.” — Madisyn Cox, after women’s 200 IM final (bronze, 2:09.71)

“This means it’s another step forward. It means it’s another step in the right direction. I still have to go home and work even harder this time to move myself even higher. It’s a good stepping stone. I’m right where I want to be, and I have to keep moving forward from that.” — Cox, on what the race means for her career

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Riders and directors pay tribute to ‘Tour de France great’ Chris Froome

Froome’s colleagues laud the praise on the four time Tour de France winner

Chris Froome‘s “cannibal instincts” are helping him to become one of cycling’s greats, if he is not already after four Tour de France wins.

The 32-year-old Brit confirmed his win in Paris, the most hotly contested of his four titles. Along with those titles, Froome counts seven stage wins, three Critérium du Dauphiné titles and two overall Tour de Romandie victories.

>>> Chris Froome: ‘I never dreamed of being named alongside Merckx, Anquetil, Hinault, and Indurain’

“He is normal off the bike, someone you can become friends with, but this guy has won the Tour de France four times and been on the podium in the Vuelta,” Team Sky sports director Nicolas Portal said.

Chris Froome on stage 18 of the 2017 Tour de France (Sunada)

“On the bike he has his strength and this cannibal instinct. He just wants to win and his team-mates have to keep him calm.

“When there’s a little bit of crosswinds he just wants to go. To be honest, that is strange because when you know, him he’s quite calm.”

Froome showed that drive with attacks downhill and in the wind in the 2016 Tour and when he and his Sky team helped split the group on the Romans-sur-Isere finish this year.

“He doesn’t get the respect for how much of an intelligent rider he is, sometimes he seems erratic or he just moves freely, but he’s intelligent and thinks things through,” team-mate Luke Rowe said.

“That’s what you want as a helper, someone with confidence.

Chris Froome and Team Sky attack in the crosswinds at the Tour de France (ASO)

“He’s learned and got used to the pressure of it all. The better you deal with that, the better you are. With years of experience, he’s dealt with that pressure and the hype that much better.”

Froome’s win puts him ahead of American Greg LeMond and two others with three wins. Only four, the greats, have gone on to win five times.

“If you win four editions of this race then you are one of cycling’s greats,” Dutch rider Laurens Ten Dam (Sunweb) said.

“The way he does it is may be different than how they did in the past with riders like Bernard Hinault but cycling’s changed. They would have attacked more and raced the Classics as well.

“You can admire Chris Froome’s focus. Look at the way he was going in the crosswinds this year or last year, or how he ran on Mont Ventoux.


Watch: The best of the 2017 Tour de France


“That shows this mentality and focus on winning, of thinking only about getting to the line as fast as possible.”

“Just look at what you saw in Romans-sur-Isere in the crosswinds, when he was there and fighting,” Bahrain-Merida sports director, Tristan Hoffman said.

“You have to remember that he began in a hard position from Africa and then Barloworld. It’s hard for many riders to make their way like that, but Froome did it.”

Froome nearly won the Vuelta a España already twice in 2011 and 2016, adding up to three second place finishes in the Spanish Grand Tour. He plans on racing the 2017 edition this year, and taking revenge.

“He’s a complete rider and a good example for the sport,” manager at LottoNL-Jumbo, Richard Plugge added.

“I would like him to do some more in other races like the Giro d’Italia, but you can understand why he just focuses on the Tour de France.”


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Adam Peaty’s World Record in 50 Breast Highlights Day Three Prelims in Budapest

Photo Courtesy: Rob Schumacher- USA TODAY Sports

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Great Britain’s Adam Peaty set the first men’s world record of the 2017 FINA World Championships during the third day of prelims when he took down his old global standard in the men’s 50 breast by three tenths of a second.

Elsewhere, Italy took two top seeds as Federica Pellegrini qualified first in the women’s 200 free and Gregorio Paltrinieri did the same in the men’s 800 free, while Hungary’s own Laszlo Cseh topped heats of the men’s 200 fly.

Read below for full coverage of each event.

Full Results

Men’s 50 Breast

Adam Peaty scorched the competition in prelims of the men’s 50 breast, finishing more than three hundredths ahead of the previous World Record of 26.42 with a 26.10.

The previous World Record was owned by Peaty and posted at the 2015 FINA World Championships in Kazan, Russia and doubled as the Championship Record.

Today’s new record marks the third time that Peaty has set the World Record in the 50 meter breast:

  • 2014 – 26.62 (European Championships)
  • 2015 – 26.42 (FINA World Championships in Kazan)
  • 2017 – 26.10 (FINA World Championships in Budapest)

He now leads the top 16 qualifiers going into tonight’s semi-finals heats.

South Africa’s Cameron van der Burgh picked up the second place swim with a record-breaking swim of his own. His time of 26.54 bests the South African National Record in the 50 breast. The previous record, owned by van der Burgh, was a 26.62 from the 2015 FINA World Championships.

Brazil’s Joao Gomes Junior grabbed the third place seed with a time of 26.67, followed closely by the USA’s Kevin Cordes and his time of 26.83.

Kirill Prigoda of Russia took fifth in prelims with a 26.91, just ahead of Brazil’s Felipe Lima’s 26.93.

Belarus’ Ilya Shymanovich and Italy’s Fabio Scozzoli were seventh and eighth in prelims with times of 27.01 and 27.04 respectively.

Also qualifying for tonight’s semi-finals were Italy’s Nicolo Martinenghi (27.08), Japan’s Yasuhiro Koseki (27.21), Lithuania’s Giedrius Titenis (27.24), China’s Yan Zibei (27.25), Serbia’s Caba Siladi (27.27), Sweden’s Johannes Skagius (27.27), and the USA’s Cody Miller (27.31).

A swim-off took place for the sixteenth spot as Russia’s Vsevolod Zanko, the Netherlands’ Arno Kamminga and Slovenia’s Peter Stevens delivered matching times of 27.39.

Stevens in the three-way swim off and will move on to semi-finals of the men’s 50 breast. Stevens led the swift 50-meters from start-to-finish, posting the fastest time of the trio at a 27.38 over Zanko’s 27.41 and Kamminga’s 27.43.

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Women’s 200 Free

Italy’s Federica Pellegrini, the 2009 and 2011 World Champion in the women’s 200 free as well as the world record-holder, laid down the time to beat in the event’s morning prelims. She came in at 1:56.07 to finish two tenths ahead of Olympic gold medalist Katie Ledecky.

Ledecky, already a winner in Budapest in the 400 free, qualified second in 1:56.27, and hometown favorite Katinka Hosszu qualified third in 1:56.43. Australia’s Emma McKeon, the 100 fly silver medalist, and Hong Kong’s Siobhan Haughey both broke 1:57 as well, finishing with respective times of 1:56.61 and 1:56.62.

American Leah Smith took sixth in 1:57.04, and she was followed closely by the Netherlands’ Femke Heemskerk (1:57.06), Russia’s Veronika Popova (1:57.06), Sweden’s Michelle Coleman (1:57.15) and France’s Charlotte Bonnet (1:57.34).

Also making the semi-finals were Japan’s Chihiro Igarashi (1:57.67), China’s Li Bingjie (1:57.79) and Ai Yanhan (1:58.04), Canada’s Katerine Savard (1:58.16) and Mary-Sophie Harvey (1:58.38) and the Netherlands’ Robin Neumann (1:58.66).

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Men’s 200 Fly

Laszlo Cseh of Hungary charged ahead of the competition in prelims of the men’s 200 fly to a roaring home crowd. Cseh grabbed the top qualifying time out of prelims with a time of 1:54.08.

Japan’s Daiya Seto picked up the second place seed with a time of 1:54.89, followed by denmark’s Viktor Bromer and his time of 1:55.13.

Antani Ivanov of Bulgaria turned in a fourth place qualifying time of 1:55.55, while South Africa’s Chad le Clos grabbed the fifth place seed with a 1:55.90.

Japan’s Masato Sakai qualified sixth overall close on le Clos’ heels with a time of 1:55.94, just ahead of Hungary’s Tamas Kenderesi’s 1:55.96.

Jack Conger of the USA rounded out the top eight qualifiers.

Also returning for tonight’s semi-finals will be Russia’s Daniil Pakhomov (1:56.07), Poland’s Jan Switkowski (1:56.20), the USA’s Pace Clark (1:56.23), Italy’s Giacomo Carini (1:56.52), Australia’s David Morgan (1:56.57), Colombia’s Jonathan Gomez (1:56.60), Australia’s Grant Irvine (1:56.61), and Brazil’s (Leonardo de Deus (1:56.71).

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Men’s 800 Free

Italy’s Gregorio Paltrinieri posted the top time coming out of prelims in the men’s 800 free. He won his heat in 7:45.31, about one second ahead of Poland’s Wojciech Wojdak.

Wojdak ended up qualifying second in 7:46.39, and third went to Norway’s Henrik Christiansen in 7:47.61. The No. 4 seed also came from that same heat as Austria’s Felix Auboeck touched in 7:49.24.

In the final heat of the event, China’s Sun Yang finished just ahead of Italy’s Gabriele Detti. Sun touched in 7:49.28, while Detti came in at 7:49.67. The duo won gold and bronze, respectively, in Sunday’s 400 free.

Germany’s Florian Wellbrock qualified seventh for the final in 7:50.89, and the United States’ Zane Grothe took eighth in 7:50.97.

Just missing the final were Egypt’s Akram Mahmoud (7:51.41) and the USA’s Clark Smith (7:51.83), while Australia’s Mack Horton, the silver medalist in the 400 free Sunday, scratched out of the event to rest up for the 800 free relay and 1500 free later in the week.

men-800-free-prelims

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Peter Stevens Wins Men’s 50 Breast Swim-Off; Continues to Semi-Finals

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The men’s 50 breaststroke lit the pool on fire this morning as each country brought their A-Game to qualify.

Three individuals delivered matching times of 27.39 to create a three-way tie for sixteenth, creating the possibility of a swim-off to determine who continues on to tonight’s semi-finals.

Russia’s Vsevolod Zanko, Slovenia’s Peter Stevens, and the Netherlands’ Arno Kamminga each have a chance to move on, but will have to beat out the other two in a potential swim-off that would follow the conclusion of the men’s 800 free preliminary heats.

Swimming World will update this post as results become available.

UPDATED:

Peter Stevens of Slovenia claimed victory in the three-way swim off and will move on to semi-finals of the men’s 50 breast. Stevens led the swift 50-meters from start-to-finish, posting the fastest time of the trio at a 27.38 over Zanko’s 27.41 and Kamminga’s 27.43.

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Chris Froome confirmed for Vuelta a España on back of Tour de France victory

Team Sky rider looks to improve on his three second places

Just days after winning his fourth Tour de France, Chris Froome has confirmed that he will compete in the 2017 Vuelta a España as he looks to complete a historic Tour/Vuelta double.

No rider has won the Tour and the Vuelta in the same year since the latter moved to its current August/September slot in 1995, with Froome finishing second on three occasions, including after winning the Tour in 2016.

>>> Vuelta a España route 2017: key climbs and what to expect

“The Vuelta is a race I love racing. It’s a vicious race but it’s three weeks that I enjoy,” Froome said in an interview with Sky Sports.

“I’ve come second three times now and I’d love to win the Vuelta. To win the Tour and the Vuelta in one year would be absolutely incredible. I’ve got that opportunity now and I’m certainly going to go for it.”

Froome will face many of the same riders who he beat to the yellow jersey in July, with Romain Bardet, Fabio Aru, and Alberto Contador all expected to be on the start line, as well as high calibre riders who skipped the Tour such as Vincenzo Nibali.

>>> Who will be riding the 2017 Vuelta a España?

The Team Sky rider has come close to winning the Vuelta on three occasions, his nearest miss coming in 2011 when he finished just 13 seconds behind Juan José Cobo after spending much of the race working for team-mate Bradley Wiggins. He also finished second to Alberto Contador in 2014 and Nairo Quintana in 2016.

The Vuelta a España starts in the French city of Nîmes on August 19, finishing three weeks later on September 10 in Madrid.


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Laszlo Cseh Leads 200 Fly Prelims Field; Seto Qualifies Second

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Men’s 200 Fly

Laszlo Cseh of Hungary charged ahead of the competition in prelims of the men’s 200 fly to a roaring home crowd. Cseh grabbed the top qualifying time out of prelims with a time of 1:54.08.

Japan’s Daiya Seto picked up the second place seed with a time of 1:54.89, followed by denmark’s Viktor Bromer and his time of 1:55.13.

Antani Ivanov of Bulgaria turned in a fourth place qualifying time of 1:55.55, while South Africa’s Chad le Clos grabbed the fifth place seed with a 1:55.90.

Japan’s Masato Sakai qualified sixth overall close on le Clos’ heels with a time of 1:55.94, just ahead of Hungary’s Tamas Kenderesi’s 1:55.96.

Jack Conger of the USA rounded out the top eight qualifiers.

Also returning for tonight’s semi-finals will be Russia’s Daniil Pakhomov (1:56.07), Poland’s Jan Switkowski (1:56.20), the USA’s Pace Clark (1:56.23), Italy’s Giacomo Carini (1:56.52), Australia’s David Morgan (1:56.57), Colombia’s Jonathan Gomez (1:56.60), Australia’s Grant Irvine (1:56.61), and Brazil’s (Leonardo de Deus (1:56.71).

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Swim-Off Possible for Men’s 50 Breast at 2017 FINA World Championships

Photo Courtesy: Taylor Brien

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The men’s 50 breaststroke lit the pool on fire this morning as each country brought their A-Game to qualify.

Three individuals delivered matching times of 27.39 to create a three-way tie for sixteenth, creating the possibility of a swim-off to determine who continues on to tonight’s semi-finals.

Russia’s Vsevolod Zanko, Slovenia’s Peter Stevens, and the Netherlands’ Arno Kamminga each have a chance to move on, but will have to beat out the other two in a potential swim-off that would follow the conclusion of the men’s 800 free preliminary heats.

Swimming World will update this post as results become available.

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