Eight best exercise bikes for indoor cycling

Looking to get a pedal fix indoors and want a bike that’s always ready for the job? Here’s eight to choose from…

Cycling is a great way to get fit, but not all of us are able to get outside and enjoy riding on the open road.

Traditionally, cyclists training indoors will attach their own bike to a turbo trainer or ride on rollers. However, if you’ve got a dedicated space for a bike you can leave consistently set up and ready to go – or have no intention or riding outside – then an exercise bike is a great choice.

Exercise bikes vary rather dramatically in price and spec – starting from as low as £100 and travelling well in excess of £2000. Which is the right one for you depends which functions and features are important to you.

>>> Beginner’s guide to indoor cycling

An entry level model will allow you to get a spin on, and get fit. Spend more, and you’ll enjoy ANT+ and Bluetooth connectivity, so you can train using indoor training apps such as Zwift or The Sufferfest.

On more expensive exercise bikes, the resistance unit will allow you to put out greater wattages, offering more resistance to mimic the hills and the adjustability will usually be greater.

We’ve pulled together some of the best models on the market, to explain what you’ll get at each price point.

The first four models are closer to ‘spinning bikes‘, and will suit beginners looking to get fit. The latter four offer connectivity to cycling specific apps, and will more suited to regular bike riders, in training for events and looking to get a pedal fix inside.

With each product is a ‘Buy Now’ or ‘Best Deal’ link. If you click on this then we may receive a small amount of money from the retailer when you purchase the item. This doesn’t affect the amount you pay.

JLL IC300 indoor exercise bike: £169.99

best exercise bike

You can find exercise bikes for under £100, but typically they won’t feel very smooth and will be much lighter in weight – which though practical in the home, will mean they feel less stable when you start putting power through the pedals.

This JLL model impresses us with its 18kg flywheel, and multi-level resistance. It can support a rider weight up to 130kg and comes with plenty of adjustability with a set up that can be aggressive and racy, or more upright.

An on-board LCD computer shows you time pedalled, distance, calories and even heart rate, thanks to a built in handlebar sensor.

The bike uses a chain drive system, and has rubberised feet plus pedals with toe straps.

See it here at Amazon for £169.99

Domyos VS900 exercise bike: £299.99

best exercise bike

The VS900 from Domyos uses a 20 kilogram flywheel to provide ample resistance, with a belt transmission which keeps the system quiet.

Resistance is increased via a wheel just below the handlebars, and the unit offers a built in console which measures time, distance ridden, speed, cadence (in RPM – revolutions per minute) as well as calories.

Adjustability is important, so you can insure you find the right fit. The saddle and handlebars can be adjusted horizontally and vertically, and the pedals come with toe clips though can be swapped for clipless pedals if you wish.

Four adjustable feet can be used to steady the bike on uneven floors, and the full weight is 58kg so it’s unlikely you’ll be lifting it off the ground in sprint efforts.

Buy now at Decathlon for £299.99

JTX Cyclo 6 exercise bike: £499

best exercise bike

With a 22kg flywheel, you’ll get plenty of resistance from this machine and this can be adjusted via the knob below the handlebar.

It’s belt driven, and has a good degree of adjustability to help you find the right fit. The console at the front measures distance, speed, time, calories and heart rate, via a wireless monitor at the handlebar.

The weight is 66.5kg, and there’s four rubber feet which can be adjusted for uneven floor surfaces.

Buy now at Amazon for £499

Scwinn I.C Pro 20 indoor cycle – was £1068, now £740

best exercise bike

With 20 years worth of experience creating indoor cycling bikes, Schwinn is a big name in spinning arenas.

The ICPro20 comes with a perimeter weighted 18.6kg flywheel, for a smooth ride, with a chaindrive and steel cranks. It’s  designed for home or commercial use and the full bike weighs in at 52kg, with adjustable feet to cater for wonky floors.

You can use the flat pedals provided, or update to Scwinn Triple Link pedals, which accommodate Look Delta and SPD clipless cleats.

The narrow Q-Factor (168mm) won’t upset position for regular road riders, and the separately purchased console shows cadence.

Buy now at Best Gym Equipment for £740

BKool Smart bike: £1249

BKool Smart exercise bike

BKool is better known in cycling for its smart turbo trainers, but its smart bike released in summer 2018 adds an extra string to its bow.

The brand’s smart bike offers the same features as its turbo trainers – in that you can follow structured workouts (including an FTP test) and ride specific courses, creating an experience that is suited to cyclists training for events.

There’s an accompanying app, the bike is Bluetooth and Ant+ compatible and you can hook it up to a computer screen, tablet or smart TV, show your stats or allow you to follow a virtual route.

Resistance is automatically increased to match the incline on a course or required level for a workout and the rider’s output is measured in watts, with a max output of 1500w. You can also manually control resistance on the bike. If you complete the FTP test, your intervals will be set to suit your fitness.

The resistance unit is magnetic, with a flywheel which carries a lot of inertia to simulate real ride conditions. A belt drive system means it’s quiet. The whole thing weighs 45kg, and the Q-Factor is 179 mm – the same as on a road bike so it won’t feel strange to outdoor cyclists.

Buy now at Amazon for £1249

Wattbike Atom – £1599

wattbike atom exercise bike

Wattbike has led the cyclist’s exercise bike market for years, and the Atom is its newest creation.

The resistance unit is magnetic, and in our review we commented that “pedalling fluidity is second to none.”

You can mimic climbs up to 25 per cent and deliver up to 2000 watts, though we didn’t get near that in testing. We found it to be incredibly quiet, too.

Connectivity comes via ANT+ or Bluetooth, and you can use set workouts or hook up to an indoor training app.

There is amble adjustability, with a road bike style geometry including a 160mm Q-Factor. Flat pedals with toe cages are fitted as standard, but can be swapped for clipless pedals. All in, it’s 44kg.

Read our full review of the Wattbike Atom

Buy now at Wattbike for £1599

Tacx Neo smart bike – £2299

tacx neo smart exercise bike

The Tacx Neo smart trainer has long been a favourite at Cycling Weekly, and the smart bike version is pretty much the same turbo, with a bike pre-attached!

The unit uses magnetic resistance, and can handle up to 2,200 watts whilst mimicking climbs as steep as 25 per cent.

You can follow structured workouts, or ride a route, and you can connect with a smartphone, tablet or computer via Bluetooth or Ant+.

Ride feel has been taken to the max, with the likes of cobblestones reflected and even a virtual ‘chain jump’ as you move into a new gear, though we reckon those are a couple of elements some of us don’t necessarily want to replicate indoors.. You do get a nice speed up as you crest hills which can only be a pleasant bonus.

The bike provides pedal analysis as well as power, cadence and all the other metrics you’d expect – and the air fans attached adjust the level of cooling depending upon your heart rate or power output.

The Q-Factor is set to be the same as a road bike, there’s lots of adjustability, and all-in the weight is 50kg.

Pre-order at Tredz for £2299 

Wattbike Pro and Wattbike Trainer – £2299

best exercise bike

Buy now at Sigma Sports for £2299

Before there was the Wattbike Atom, there was the Wattbike Pro and Wattbike Trainer.

Used by coaches and performance centres across the world, the Wattbike Pro and Wattbike Trainer is the ultimate for top end sprint workouts.

At 55kg, it’s a sturdy base, and unlike the Atom does not need to be plugged into the mains. The resistance unit uses magnets and air, and the pro version allows power output up to 3,760 watts – which would be a stretch for anyone. The Trainer model goes up to 2,000 watts.

Unlike the Atom, the built in screen is provided. Pedal analysis is available, as is ANT+ and Bluetooth connectivity, though unlike the Atom the resistance can’t be influenced by an external app and users instead need to use the shifting system supplied.

Adjustability level is high, and the pedals can be swapped for your personal preference though the Q-Factor is 173mm – wider than on the newer Atom.

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