Energy for Swim Cancelled According To Statement From Adam Peaty

Photo Courtesy: SIPA USA

The 2018 Energy for Swim scheduled for December in Turin has been cancelled, according to a statement Swimming World received from a representative for world record holder Adam Peaty. The Energy for Swim has been a subject of controversy over the past months, as more swimmers continued to commit to competing despite FINA’s threats of possible suspension.

In the statement, Peaty said he was “incredibly disappointed” to see the Energy for Swim cancelled due to “politics.” The Olympic gold medalist went on to say that cancelling the meet was the “wrong decision” and that this will only “galvanize the swimmers, not break them.”

Peaty was one of the first swimmer’s to commit to the Energy for Swim, which is taking place immediately following the FINA Short Course Championships in December. Since then, a long list of swimmers from around the globe committed to the Energy for Swim, despite FINA’s threats to suspend any participants for up to two years if they competed in Turin.

FINA’s threats came from a line in their General Rules, which prohibits “any kind of relationship with a non-affiliated or suspended body.”

You can see the full quote from Peaty below:

“I’m incredibly disappointed next month’s swim meet in Turin has been cancelled because of politics. As swimmers who represent our country and are passionate about our sport, we need to ask why. I firmly believe that the athletes should be at the heart of any decision made by our governing body and this is just what our sport and the athletes need. I think this is the wrong decision and it will galvanize the swimmers, not break them.”

Swimvortex’s Craig Lord has also confirmed the cancellation of the meet. Swimming World will continue to update this story as it develops.

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Daniel Worth Shines as St. Louis U. High Wins Missouri Class 2 State Championships

Photo Courtesy: St. Louis U. High Twitter

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The Missouri High School Boys Class 2 State Championships took place on Nov. 9 at the St. Peters Rec-Plex. Seven Class 2 records fell as St. Louis Univ. High swam away with the team title, edging out Liberty by 15 points.

Lee’s Summit North sophomore Daniel Worth was part of two record-setting relays and set a pair of individual Class 2 marks of his own.

Click here for full results.

Top 5 Team Scores:

1. St. Louis Univ. High – 250
2. Liberty – 235
3. Christian Brothers – 224
4. Lee’s Summit North – 201
5. Rockhurst – 165

Lee’s Summit North’s Grant Godard,Worth, JP Hynes and Andrew Bennett began the meet with a 4×50 medley relay win and Class 2 record in 1:33.24 to hold off a charging Christian Brothers who took second in a close 1:33.42. Liberty was third in 1:35.80.

Holt’s Noah Scheuermann cruised to first in the 200 free as the only swimmer in the field under the 1:40 marking, stopping the clock in 1:39.29. St. Louis Univ.’s Joseph Feder was second in 1:41.70 while Liberty’s Cameron Murphy took third in 1:42.05.

Not too long after helping his relay team to victory, Worth was back in the water to take the top spot in the 200 IM with a winning time of 1:50.18 en route to setting a new Class 2 mark. Lindbergh’s Tyler Lewis wasn’t far behind in 1:50.58 for second and St. Louis Univ.’s Cooper Scharff touched in 1:55.64 for third.

Christian Brothers’ Brooks Cosman sprinted to a win and Class 2 record in the 50 free, splashing and dashing his way to the gold medal in a quick 20.86. He edged out silver medalist Hynes’ 20.92 while the bronze went to Hickman’s Joseph Ragsdell.

Christian Brothers’ August Brandt flew to first – and a Class 2 mark of his own – in the 100 fly, posting another close win in 48.62 to hold off Scheuermann’s second-place finish of 48.75. Liberty’s Noah Witzki finished third in 48.96.

Cosman found himself on top of the podium for the second time of the day, this time winning the 100 free with a swift 45.35. He again held off a fast Hynes who placed second in 45.82. Feder touched the wall in third with a time of 46.45.

Rockhurst’s Dylan Nill dominated the 500 free, posting a time of 4:33.60 to best the field by four seconds. Second went to Murphy in 4:37.12 while Liberty’s Tony Lonsdale dropped five seconds from his prelims swim to finish third in 4:38.56.

It was deja-vu for Lee’s Summit North’s Worth, Godard, Bennett and Hynes who combined to form another victorious and Class 2 record-setting relay squad, this time winning the 4×50 free relay in 1:25.53. Second went to St. Louis Univ. High (1:27.00) and third belonged to Rockhurst (1:29.38)

After taking third in the 100 fly, Witzki earned the State title in the 100 back as the only swimmer to dip under the 50-second barrier with a time of 49.76. He edged out Scharff (51.05) and Brandt (51.10) for the win.

Worth was another double-event winner and double-record setter at this meet, adding the 100 breast title in addition to his winning 200 IM. He got his hands to the wall in 55.12 to successfully defend his title, faster than Christian Brothers’ Dominic Cyr (58.16) and Joplin’s Avery Oehlschlager (58.18).

Francis Howell North’s Logan Schelfaut dove to first on the 1-meter board, posting a final score o 503.55. Blue Springs South’s Alex Burt dove to second with a score of 488.30 and Francis Howell’s Josh Smith posted a final score of 472.80 for third.

St. Louis Univ.’s Feder, Daniel FinkWilliam Slatin and Scharff concluded the meet with a victory and new Class 2 record in the 4×100 free relay in a time of 3:07.92. Christian Brothers took second in 3:08.03 and Liberty took third in 3:11.17.

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Ant Middleton On How He Almost Died Climbing Mount Everest

Here’s something I didn’t know before I spoke to Ant Middleton about his attempt to climb Everest: there’s a queue to get off the summit of the highest mountain in the world. Yes, even at 8,848m, well over 200m higher than anywhere else on the planet, you have to deal with queues – but at that height having to wait around can be deadly.

Until he reached Everest’s peak Middleton’s expedition, which is the topic of new Channel 4 documentary Extreme Everest, had been going well. He had summitted the mountain in good conditions, but the weather quickly turned on Middleton and the other climbers there.

“It was strange. I remember at the Hillary Step [a vertical rock face near the summit of Everest] the weather was good,” says Middleton, “then getting to the summit, looking around and there was no view whatsoever. The cloud starting coming in.

“The weather was really changing and I thought I could be in a bit of trouble. Everyone was starting to leave the summit. I got sidetracked and thought, ‘If everyone leaves I’m going to stay and actually be the highest man in the world. It’s only a couple of minutes, let them go.’

“Then leaving the summit the winds were really bad and it was a whiteout. No matter how much you try to cover yourself up, the winds are whipping from every direction and the snow that’s being whipped up is so fine it finds its way down the back of your neck, into your summit suit. You can’t keep it out. I walked into the back of someone, hit this traffic jam on the summit ridge. Ten to 15 people isn’t a big queue compared with what they have on Everest normally, but I was at the back. I realised the magnitude of what happened. When the storm came people were sitting there not doing anything. Their confidence had gone. I went from ‘I’m going to be the last person standing on the mountain’ to ‘am I going to get off the mountain?’ It was a fight for survival, every man for himself.”

While Middleton was waiting to descend, disaster struck. A climber ahead of him fell and was left hanging from his rope, blocking the route to those behind him and forcing the climbers to make a grim decision.

“The guy who fell off the mountain was in front of me and delayed us by another hour while they tried to rescue him,” says Middleton. “They were that close to cutting him off the mountain so myself and another sherpa could get through. He’s there on the rope and a couple of us die, or we cut him off and we can get down.

“He was falling in and out of consciousness. I thought there’s no way in a million years he’s going to get up. It got worse and worse, we were getting colder and colder. How he managed to position himself so the sherpa could pull him back up, I’ll never know.”

The situation continued to deteriorate as Middleton made his way back down.

“The sequence of events that happened, you couldn’t write,” says Middleton. “This guy they were going to cut off the mountain, then he managed to get back on his feet. Then we walked off the ridge down to the south summit and on the way there was a sherpa stuck there with no oxygen. We tried to drag him off but he wasn’t moving, too far gone. I then ran out of oxygen. My sherpa team had got split up with the cameraman, they were halfway down the mountain – it was just an utter disaster.

“Everything that could have gone wrong, went wrong. I had that split second thinking I was done, I couldn’t possibly get off the mountain. But then I thought ‘You’re alive, Ant, and you need to find a solution’.

“The number one rule is keep moving, or you’re going to die. I kept passing that message on as well.”

I asked Middleton whether it was a difficult change in mindset from his time in the armed forces to go into full-on self-preservation mode on the mountain. It’s fair to say the former Special Forces man was left unimpressed by some of the climbers he saw on Everest.

“In the armed forces everyone’s capable,” says Middleton. “You wouldn’t put anyone else at risk – you’re capable and confident and know what you’re doing. When you’ve got people who pay tens of thousands to get dragged up the mountain, you take away that self-responsibility when the shit does hit the fan.

“The sherpas are not mountain rescue guys. They’re there to help with the kit and they acclimatise quicker, but they have got their own lives. That’s why climbers do get left on the mountain – they don’t realise above a certain point you are accountable for your own life. The helicopter isn’t coming up there, the sherpas need to get down.

“You look at the altitude and the weather that comes in, and you add in incompetent climbers – you have a recipe for disaster. You’re doing a climb which is quite technical, where there is only one way on and off, and you’ve got to hold yourself accountable. That’s the nightmare commercial side of Everest. There’s an ice wall and people get dragged up it by their sherpas. And it’s like, ‘What are you doing on the mountain mate?!’

“You can’t just trek up, you have to climb Mount Everest to the summit. If you want a trek, go from Lukla to Base Camp, because otherwise you will come unstuck, and when you do you’ll not only kill yourself but also kill other people.”

Middleton’s summitting of Everest took a heavy physical toll, with his feet bearing the brunt of the damage. He recalls first noticing that he couldn’t feel his toes long before he even made it to the peak.

“I can remember getting to The Balcony [a small platform at 8,440m where climbers can rest] after a couple of hours of climbing and I literally couldn’t feel my feet. You try and kick the snow but your feet either warm up or they don’t. I asked myself, ‘am I willing to lose a couple of toes?’ And the answer was yes.

“I thought I can’t turn back around and not summit, then have people ask ‘Why did you turn around?’ Cold feet?! There’s no way in a million years I was going to do that! I just had to take the gamble.”

Middleton had set out for Everest with the aim of testing himself, and he certainly came away under no doubt about the power of nature.

“I wanted the full force of Everest,” says Middleton. “I didn’t want to go on the mountain and have a jolly old time up there. I wasn’t there for the views. I was there for the mountain to test me and push me. Be careful what you wish for!

“It’s fuelled my desire for adventure even more, but also it’s made me realise how vulnerable we are and that we can’t control everything. Being in the situation where I feared for my life and there was nothing I could do about it… it made me feel half a human, almost.”

Extreme Everest with Ant Middleton, in association with Berocca, airs on Sunday 11th November at 9.30pm on Channel 4

Poseidon’s Adam Kerr Announces Verbal to North Carolina

Photo Courtesy: Adam Kerr

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To report a college commitment, email HS@swimmingworld.com. Join Swimming World’s Watch List

NEW COMMIT: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has recently gained a new verbal commitment for the fall of 2019 from Chesterfield, Va. native Adam Kerr.

Kerr swims year-round with Poseidon Swimming and owns three Winter Junior cuts with a Nationals standard in the 400m IM. He capped off his summer season with a pair of best times and a 16th-place showing in the 200m breast at NCSAs and was a five-time VA LCM Seniors finalist. He achieved 100% lifetime bests at the Tom Dolan Invite last winter and had three second swims at NCSAs in March. Kerr also represented Cosby High School at the Virginia 6A State Championships as a junior where he finished third in the 200 IM and 12th in the 100 breast after winning the former at the VHSL 6B Region meet a week prior.

He told Swimming World:

“I’m incredibly excited to announce my verbal commitment to swim at the University of North Carolina! A huge thank you to all who have supported me along the way! #goheels”

His best times include:

  • 200 IM – 1:53.07
  • 400 IM – 3:55.85
  • 100 back – 51.72
  • 200 back – 1:49.89
  • 100 breast – 57.95
  • 200 breast – 2:04.18

When he suits up for the Tar Heels as a member of the class of 2023, Kerr will add valuable depth to a young but talented IM training group led by Tyler Hill and Jacob Rauch. Although he sits just outside of scoring range at the ACC Championships, he has continuously made improvements each season with just under a year of club swimming still to go.

If you have a commitment to share, please send a photo and quote via email to hs@swimmingworld.com.

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Vermont Catamounts Gain Verbals From Skyler Ayers, Jenny O’Neil 

Photo Courtesy: Brian Jenkins-UVM Athletics

Agon is the proud sponsor of all high school coverage (recruiting, results, state championships, etc.) on SwimmingWorld.com. For more information about Agon, visit their website AgonSwim.com.

To report a college commitment, email HS@swimmingworld.com. Join Swimming World’s Watch List

NEW COMMITS: The University of Vermont has received a pair of verbal commitments from Skyler Ayers and Jenny O’Neil, both of whom will join the Catamounts in the fall of 2019.

Ayers will make her way to Burlington, Vt. from Charleston, S.C. where she does her club swimming for City of Charleston Southern Marlins. She placed tenth in the 50 free at the SC SCY Championships in February and recorded six personal bests at ISCA Seniors this summer. Ayers also won the 100 free at the SCHSL 3A State Championships earlier this fall.

Photo Courtesy: Skyler Ayers

Ayers will add valuable depth to a Vermont sprint training group that includes Sierra Sexton and Kira Parker. Although she sits just outside of scoring range at the America East Championships, Ayers has continuously made improvements each season with just under a year of club swimming still to go.

She told Swimming World:

“I chose UVM because the second I stepped on campus and met with the team it felt like where I was meant to be. Every body was kind, motivated, and passionate, and for me everything just clicked.”

Her best times include:

  • 50 free – 24.91
  • 100 free – 54.20
  • 200 free – 2:00.93

Hailing from Abington, Mass., O’Neil swims year-round with South Shore Mill Pond YMCA and concluded her long course season with three swims at YMCA Nationals. She raced the 100 fly and 200 IM at YMCA Nationals in April after achieving 100% lifetime bests at New England Seniors last winter with her highest finish being a 16th-place showing in the 100 fly.

Photo Courtesy: Jenny O’Neil

When she suits up for the Catamounts at the start of the 2019-20 season, O’Neil will join a fly group led by Vivian Nguyen and a backstroke training squad that includes Morgan Montgomery and Amelia Baxley. She would’ve scored in the A-final of the 100 fly at America Easts last season.

She told Swimming World:

“UVM was the perfect fit for me academically and athletically. Right when I stepped on campus, I truly felt at home. Go Cats!!!!”

Her best times include:

  • 100 fly – 57.09
  • 200 IM – 2:10.20
  • 100 back – 59.79

If you have a commitment to share, please send a photo and quote via email to hs@swimmingworld.com.

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Turkish Open: Li Haotong takes three-shot lead over Rose and Levy

China's Li Haotong, right, with playing partner Tommy Fleetwood

Turkish Open third-round leaderboard
-17 L Haotong (Chn); -14 J Rose (Eng), A Levy (Fra); -13 T Olesen (Den); -12 D Willett (Eng); S Horsfield (Eng); -11 T Fleetwood (Eng), T Aiken (SA)
Selected others: -10 T Lewis (Eng); -9 P Dunne (Ire); -8 R Knox (Sco), C Paisley (Eng, S Lowry (Ire); -7 P Harrington (Ire), A Sullivan (Eng)
Full leaderboard

China’s Li Haotong hit five birdies on the front nine to take a three-shot lead over Justin Rose and France’s Alexander Levy on day three at the Turkish Airlines Open.

Rose, who can go back to the top of the world rankings with victory on Sunday, had a two-shot overnight lead.

However, the Englishman only managed a two-under-par 69 in his third round.

Li, 23, also eagled the 10th hole and birdied the 12th to finish with an eight-under 63.

“It’s going to be an exciting day tomorrow and I’m looking forward to going against Rosey,” said Li, who won the Dubai Desert Classic earlier this season.

“I definitely got a lot of confidence from Dubai and since then I’ve been playing a lot of big events.”

Levy made the most of the low-scoring conditions at Regnum Carya Golf and Spa Resort to card a 66 and share second spot with reigning champion Rose, one shot clear of the 2016 champion Thorbjorn Olesen of Denmark.

England’s Danny Willet and Sam Horsfield are five shots back on 12 under with Tommy Fleetwood, Li’s playing partner on day three, on 11 under.

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Black Friday 2018 cycling deals: Get a Garmin Edge 520 for £149 and much more

Black Friday 2018 has begun, here are the best deals in the run up to the big day

As we predicted, Black Friday has kicked off a whole month before the scheduled date of Friday 23rd November. However, that’s no bad thing because there’s a tonne of a great bargains to be bagged in these early stages.

So far, the deals are just from Chain Reaction Cycles and Wiggle but have no fear, they’ll be plenty of other retailers releasing their own bargains over the next few days and weeks.

The products featured have been chosen because we know they’re good quality and are an excellent offer at the price we’ve included (at the time of writing). Our tech team have unrivalled expertise and years of experience testing new products, so you can trust our recommendations – and we also know what represents a good deal. Where we’ve reviewed the product we’ve included a link to it so you can read more.

With each product is a ‘Buy Now’ link. If you click on this then we may receive a small amount of money from the retailer when you purchase the item. This doesn’t affect the amount you pay.

The best Black Friday 2018 cycling deals

Looking for deals NOW? Check out:

Tacx Neo smart trainer was £1,199, now £879.99

tacx neo

The Tacx Neo smart trainer

Read more: Tacx Neo smart trainer review

Each year we see a host of smart trainers get big discounts and now you can get close to £400 off a market leading Tacx Neo.

It’s a good trainer, with a very stable base and some of the best ascent and descent replication on the market. It hooks up to Zwift seamlessly or you can use Tacx’s own training software. It even replicates the feel of the road if you’re riding over gravel or cobbles.

Buy now: Tacx Neo smart trainer at Chain Reaction Cycles for £879.99

Garmin Edge 520 was £239, now £149

garmin edge 520 campagnolo eps gears

Garmin Edge 520 is easy to operate

Read more: Garmin Edge 520 review

The Garmin Edge 520 is one of the leading cycling computers on the market, and now you can get close to £90 off of one – perfect if you’re looking to boost your performance.

The Edge 520 can hook up to your power meter, speed and cadence sensors, give you Strava Live segments on the fly, measure VO2 Max and much, much more.

Buy now: Garmin Edge 520 at Wiggle for £149.99

SRAM Red eTap groupset was £1278, now £899

sram red etap featured image

Read more: SRAM Red eTap groupset review

Although it is also a top level groupset, SRAM’s Red eTap system is quite different to Shimano’s top flight offering.

For starters, it’s completely wireless. This makes it very light and unique in its shifting which uses the levers differently. Charging it is also different, and you remove the batteries from the mechs themselves and plug them into a charging unit. Its different, but good and now with a whopping £300 discount.

Buy now: SRAM Red eTap groupset at Wiggle for £999

Park Tool Home Mechanic Repair Stand was £169, now £99

Whether you’re a hardened workshop hand or a budding home mechanic, no cyclist should be without a raised repair stand. With the bike elevated off the ground, no longer must you turn it upside, or precariously balance it against you’re nice painted walls.

The Park Tool Home Mechanic Repair Stand has a adjustable clamp and body, allowing you to get the perfect height and grip on the bike.

Buy now: Park Tool Home Mechanic Repair Stand at Chain Reaction Cycles for £99

Oakley Jawbreaker Prizm road sunglasses were £175, now £90

Just one of the seven standard colour options available

Read more: Oakley Jawbreaker Prizm glasses review

The Oakley Jawbreaker glasses are some of our favourites. They’re big, with good covering and sticky rubber edging to hold them in place. Plus the Prizm lens is very contrasting, giving good depth and clarity when on the bike. However, it’s worth noting that these are better suited to wider faces – they can slip on skinnier ones.

Buy now: Oakley Jawbreaker Prizm glasses at Chain Reaction Cycles for £90

What is Black Friday?

Black Friday is the first Friday after Thanksgiving (which in 2018 is November 23), and is traditionally seen as the start of the Christmas shopping season, with high street retailers opening their doors at the crack of dawn and offering big discounts for shoppers who have set their alarm clocks.

For consumers and retailers in the UK, Black Friday is a recent phenomenon, but it has been going strong the

Amazon launched the concept in the UK in 2010, with Asda joining the party in 2013.

The rise of internet shopping has allowed the Black Friday tradition to spread throughout the world, with the UK’s bike retailers like WiggleChain Reaction Cycles and Evans Cycles, all getting caught up in the scramble to get shoppers to part with their cash.

Where can I find the best Black Friday bike deals?

Last year, all the major cycling retailers followed the same pattern demonstrated by the major retailers – with big deals in tech, as well as discounts on bikes.

The end of year placement of the sale period means it’s useful for retailers to boost their 2018 sales, and also helps them to shift 2018 stock in order to make space in their warehouses for 2019 bikes – so we can expect to see similar trends this year.

Black Friday sale shopping tips

When Black Friday 2017 really kicks off, you can expect to be bombarded with deals and offers from every angle. It’s easy to be tempted into making impulse purchases, resulting in an overspend that leaves you feeling unfulfilled – but with a little careful planning you can make sure you enter December having made genuine savings that leave you with a glowing halo and a healthy bank balance.

Here are our tips for Black Friday sale shopping success…

Be well informed

A handful of retailers will remain completely silent about the details of their Black Friday sale until the actual day. Most will drip feed information, giving you a chance to prepare for your shopping in advance. Here’s how to stay informed:

  • Sign up to mailing lists: A plague that you avoid most of the year, ahead of Black Friday it’s actually a really good idea to subscribe to the mailing lists of major retailers, as they’ll often send priority invites to view sale stock ahead of the general public
  • Bookmark this page: Retailers will send us forewarning of their sale offers in the form of press releases – and we’ll publish the information on this page as soon as we’re able
  • Follow brands and retailers on social media: They will share details with their loyal followers in advance – so click ‘like’ and ‘follow’ to be first in the queue

Check returns policies

As always, these vary from store to store – but in some cases returns may be limited to 30 days. So if you pick up a gift for someone on Black Friday – November 24 – by Christmas day a return may be out of the question. Though we don’t doubt your gift giving prowess, it’s a good idea to bear this in mind.

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Old Dominion Scores Verbal From Backstroker Summer Sampson

Photo Courtesy: Summer Sampson

Agon is the proud sponsor of all high school coverage (recruiting, results, state championships, etc.) on SwimmingWorld.com. For more information about Agon, visit their website AgonSwim.com.

To report a college commitment, email HS@swimmingworld.com. Join Swimming World’s Watch List

NEW COMMIT: Virginia Beach, Va. native Summer Sampson has announced her in-state verbal to Old Dominion University for the fall of 2019.

Sampson does her club swimming with East Coast Aquatic Team and capped off her summer season at Richmond Futures where she competed in two events after posting three best times at VA LCM Seniors. She achieved 100% lifetime bests at VA Seniors in March before finaling in a pair of events at ISCA Juniors. Primarily a backstroker, Sampson has also raced at the Virginia 6A State Championships for Bayside each of her high school seasons so far.

She told Swimming World:

“I am excited to announce my verbal commitment to Old Dominion University to further my swimming and academic career. I want to thank my family, friends, and coaches for guiding me and making it all possible. Can’t wait to be be a part of the Monarch family!” 

Her best times include:

  • 50 back – 27.94
  • 100 back – 58.30
  • 200 back – 2:06.93

When she suits up for the Monarchs next fall, Sampson will make an immediate impact in their backstroke group. She would’ve scored in the B-final of the 100 back and the C-final of the 200 back at the 2018 Conference USA Championships.

If you have a commitment to share, please send a photo and quote via email to hs@swimmingworld.com.

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Ekoï celebrates its 17th birthday with 40% off all weekend

French direct sales brand discounts its entire range this weekend only

It’s 17 years since, in 2001, Ekoï set out to disrupt the cycling clothing market with its innovative kit. To celebrate, from today for the whole of the weekend, Ekoï is offering a 40% discount across its entire site. You can take a look here.

The brand has become something of a behemoth in its home market, with many riders on French roads decked out in its eye-catching kit.

Ekoï is less well known in the UK. It sells directly to consumers from its website and offers sharp pricing on the riding essentials: clothing, sunglasses, helmets, shoes etc. Its custom configurator lets you choose from a range of options to make many of its lines semi-bespoke.

JC Rattel, Ekoï’s founder says: “Our Objective at Ekoï is to offer our customers the best products, developed with our pro teams, at attractive prices.

“For Ekoï’s 17th anniversary, I want to offer 40% to all our customers to thank them for their loyalty. They are 100% part of this incredible story which is only at the beginning. Thank you!”

Elia Viviani had a billion different options to choose from for his Ekoï Perso Evo9 sunglasses (Tim de Waele/Getty Images)

Ekoï kit is used extensively by the pros at the WorldTour level. The entire Quickstep Floors team is decked out in its sunnies, although you wouldn’t know, as its custom configurator means that there are over a billion different options available in its Perso Evo9 sunglasses, which use Zeiss lenses.



Ekoï also provides helmets to AG2R La Mondiale, with Romain Bardet sporting the retro “hairnet” styled Ekoï Legende helmet at the Tour de France this year. Other innovative products include its Heat Concept battery heated winter gloves and overshoes and its one-size-fits-all Morfo Evo bibshorts.

Romain Bardet wore the retro style Ekoï Legende helmet at the Tour de France this year. Photo Sunada

Spend over £26 and Ekoï offers free shipping to the UK and it also has options to pay by instalment. There’s a UK based call centre too.

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