French Open 2017: Andy Murray into last eight with easy win over Karen Khachanov

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French Open
Venue: Roland Garros, Paris Dates: 28 May- 11 June
Coverage: Listen to live radio commentary and follow text coverage of selected matches on BBC Radio 5 live sports extra and online.

Britain’s Andy Murray produced a clinical performance to see off Russian Karen Khachanov and reach a seventh French Open quarter-final.

The world number one came through 6-3 6-4 6-4 to claim his 650th Tour-level victory.

A combination of sharp serving and brilliant defence took Murray through in two hours and four minutes.

The Scot, 30, goes on to face Japan’s Kei Nishikori or Fernando Verdasco of Spain in the last eight.

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Murray – beaten finalist last year – continued where he left off against Juan Martin del Potro on Saturday to beat the unseeded Russian with barely a scare.

The only British man to win the French Open is Fred Perry, in 1935.

Third seed Stan Wawrinka of Switzerland and seventh seed Marin Cilic are both in action later on Monday.

More to follow.

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French Open 2017: Simona Halep reaches last eight

Simona Halep

French Open
Venue: Roland Garros, Paris Dates: 28 May-11 June
Coverage: Live radio commentary and text coverage of selected matches on BBC Radio 5 live sports extra and online.

Third seed Simona Halep thrashed Carla Suarez Navarro 6-1 6-1 to reach the French Open quarter-finals.

Halep, the 2014 runner-up, is one of the favourites to win the title in Paris and swept aside her 21st-seeded opponent in exactly one hour.

It was the Romanian’s first win over Suarez Navarro on clay in six attempts.

She will play either fifth seed Elina Svitolina of Ukraine or qualifier Petra Martic, the world 290 from Croatia, for a place in the semi-finals.

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French Open 2017: Andy Murray set for Karen Khachanov test at Roland Garros

Andy Murray

French Open: Murray v Khachanov
Venue: Roland Garros, Paris Date: Monday, 5 June
Coverage: Listen to online radio commentary and follow text coverage on the BBC Sport website and app.

World number one Andy Murray will face up-and-coming Russian Karen Khachanov in the fourth round of the French Open at about 11:30 BST on Monday.

Top seed Murray, 30, is trying to reach the last eight in Paris for the sixth time in the past seven years.

Khachanov, 21, is ranked 53rd and plays his first Grand Slam last-16 match after beating American John Isner.

“Mentally I feel pretty good just now,” Briton Murray said after beating Juan Martin del Potro in round three.

Having struggled with fitness and form during much of the year, the Scot played superbly to see off the Argentine in straight sets on Saturday.

“After each round, I’m not thinking about winning,” he said.

“I didn’t come here with the mindset that I’m definitely going to go a long way.

“I was going to try and just get through the first round and hopefully feel better each day. That’s been the case so far.”

Khachanov poses a new challenge for the Wimbledon champion, and it will be the Russian’s first match against any of the very top names in the sport.

He said: “That is what we are looking for, to play on the big arenas like here, centre court, and to play against world number one. I’m really looking forward for it.”

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Khachanov was born in Moscow but has trained in Barcelona for the past three years, during which time he has risen from outside the world’s top 400 to become a fixture around the top 50.

The 6ft 6in right-hander has plenty of power, as he showed in seeing off big-serving Isner in the third round.

That followed his best win to date over 13th seed Tomas Berdych.

“I practised with him before he got on to the tour when he was like 350, and he was really good,” said Murray.

“Big, strong guy. Generates a lot of power. He’s also got a big serve.”

Khachanov has hit 29 aces to Murray’s 16 in the tournament, and has spent an hour less on court at just under the eight-hour mark.

Murray will head into the match with a very different mindset, however, following his impressive performance against Del Potro.

“I believe in myself, so even when things aren’t going well, I believe I can turn it around,” said Murray.

“The five-set format has definitely helped that, so I have maybe not been as anxious going into some of the matches, because I know there is some time to turn it around.”

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Tearful Muguruza unhappy with 'tough' Paris crowd

Kristina Mladenovic beats Garbine Muguruza at the French Open

French Open
Venue: Roland Garros, Paris Dates: 28 May – 11 June
Coverage: Listen to live radio commentary and follow text coverage of selected matches on BBC Radio 5 live sports extra and online.

Defending champion Garbine Muguruza was unhappy with a “really tough” crowd after defeat by home favourite Kristina Mladenovic at the French Open.

The Spaniard, 23, lost 6-1 3-6 6-3 on a packed Suzanne Lenglen Court which gave its full backing to Mladenovic.

Seven-time Grand Slam winner Venus Williams’ defeat by Swiss Timea Bacsinszky means a new major champion will be crowned in Paris on Saturday.

“It’s a very painful defeat here in the French Open,” said a tearful Muguruza.

“The crowd was really tough today. I can’t really understand. I don’t know how to explain.

“If you had been in my shoes on the court, I think you would have understood.

“I don’t know what people were expecting. I’d rather not say anything more.”

Mladenovic, 24, served 16 double faults but came through amid a raucous atmosphere on the second show court at Roland Garros.

“I don’t think that they crossed the line,” she said of the crowd.

“I mean, I noticed once – and I think it was bad – when they kind of screamed between her first and second serve, but that’s because they thought it’s a double fault because the first serve was a let or something.

“But that’s the only thing that happened. Otherwise, they were quite fair.”

No Frenchwoman has won the title at Roland Garros since Mary Pierce in 2000.

Thirteenth seed Mladenovic joins Bacsinszky, Denmark’s Caroline Wozniacki and Latvian Jelena Ostapenko in the last eight, with only three of the top 10 seeds still in the draw.

Muguruza, 23, left her media conference briefly because she was so upset, before returning to reveal she was glad to relieve the pressure of being French Open champion.

“I love this tournament no matter what happens,” said Muguruza, who claimed not to have been distracted by Mladenovic’s cries of “Forza!” after the Spaniard’s errors.

“I’m going to be super happy to come back.

“Everybody is going to stop bothering me asking me about this tournament, so it’s going to be a little bit like, ‘Whew, let’s keep going.'”

Timea Bacsinszky beats Venus Williams at French Open

Second seed Karolina Pliskova, third seed Simona Halep and fifth seed Elina Svitolina will aim to reach the quarter-finals when they play their fourth-round matches on Monday.

Pliskova and Svitolina won their rain-delayed third-round matches on Sunday, while former world number one Wozniacki reached the last eight.

Williams, the 10th seed, fought back from 5-1 down to take the opening set against Bacsinszky.

But 27-year-old Bacsinszky broke Williams’ serve in the first game of the second set as she won 12 of the last 15 games in the match.

Wozniacki, 26, reached the quarter-finals at Roland Garros for the first time since 2010 with a 6-1 4-6 6-2 win over Russia’s Svetlana Kuznetsova, the eighth seed and 2009 champion.

Pliskova, the Czech, beat Carina Witthoft of Germany 7-5 6-1, while Svitolina of Ukraine overcame Poland’s Magda Linette 6-4 7-5.

Caroline Wozniacki

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Nadal & Djokovic stay on course to meet in semis

Rafael Nadal

French Open
Venue: Roland Garros, Paris Dates: 28 May- 11 June
Coverage: Listen to live radio commentary and follow text coverage of selected matches on BBC Radio 5 live sports extra and online.

Rafael Nadal continued his superb form with a dominant 6-1 6-2 6-2 win over Roberto Bautista Agut to move easily into the French Open quarter-finals.

Second seed Novak Djokovic remains on course to face Nadal in the semi-finals after a 7-6 (7-5) 6-1 6-3 win against 19th seed Albert Ramos-Vinolas.

Nadal, 31, is looking to become the first man to win 10 titles at a single Grand Slam event.

He will face another Spaniard, Pablo Carreno Busta, in the last eight.

Margaret Court is the only player to have won 10 or more titles at one Grand Slam event, winning the Australian Open on 11 occasions between 1960 and 1973.

Nadal now has a 76-2 win-loss record at Roland Garros with his only defeats coming against Robin Soderling in the fourth round in 2009 and Djokovic in the 2015 quarter-finals.

Nadal’s victory was not quite as simple as Friday’s incredible 6-0 6-1 6-0 defeat of Nikoloz Basilashvili but the fourth seed has not dropped a set yet.

It is the 11th time he has reached the quarter-finals at the French Open – a record shared with Roger Federer.

Pablo Carreno Busta beats Milos Raonic

Carreno Busta, 25, reached his first Grand Slam quarter-final with a 4-6 7-6 (7-2) 6-7 (6-8) 6-4 8-6 win over Canadian fifth seed Milos Raonic.

Carreno Busta, seeded 20th, failed to convert six match points in the deciding set before eventually grinding down last year’s Wimbledon runner-up.

And a first career win against a top-10 ranked opponent will be rewarded with a meeting against nine-time champion Nadal.

Djokovic through after sticky start

Twelve-time Grand Slam champion Djokovic, 30, has not found his way through the draw as easily as old rival Nadal – especially during a gruelling five-set win against unseeded Argentine Diego Schwartzman in the previous round.

Ramos-Vinolas’ resistance in a 73-minute opening set, where Djokovic had his serve broken twice to trail 4-2 before fighting back to win the tie-breaker, indicated it could be another battle for the Serb.

But any fears he might have had were unfounded.

Djokovic won the first four games on his way to wrapping up the second set in 28 minutes, then broke again in the sixth game of the third set – after Ramos-Vinolas saved a break point two games earlier following a thrilling 41-shot rally – before serving out to victory.

Novak Djokovic

Before thinking about the prospect of facing Nadal in the last four, Djokovic’s first task is to overcome sixth seed Dominic Thiem.

The 23-year-old Austrian – like Nadal and third seed Stan Wawrinka – has not dropped a set on his way to the last eight, needing little over an hour and a half to win 6-1 6-3 6-1 against unseeded Argentine Horacio Zeballos.

Nishikori through in five sets

Japan’s eighth seed Kei Nishikori survived a scare to beat unseeded South Korean Hyeon Chung in five sets.

Nishikori, 27, needed almost four hours to win 7-5 6-4 6-7 (4-7) 0-6 6-4 in a third-round match finished on Sunday after the previous day’s rain delay.

“I think the rain helped me a lot, because I was really down in the fourth set and mentally I wasn’t ready,” said Nishikori, whose only Grand Slam final appearance came when he lost at the 2014 US Open.

“I knew I had to change something to beat him, so I think I made some adjustments to make it a little better than yesterday.”

Kei Nishikori

Big-serving American John Isner, seeded 21, was knocked out in his third-round match by Karen Khachanov of Russia, who won 7-6 (7-1) 6-3 6-7 (5-7) 7-6 (7-3).

The 21-year-old will now face British world number one Andy Murray in the fourth round on Monday.

French 15th seed Gael Monfils reached the fourth round for a seventh time when compatriot Richard Gasquet withdrew from their rain-delayed match with a thigh injury.

Monfils, 30, was leading 7-6 (7-5) 5-7 4-3 when his opponent withdrew, setting up a last-16 meeting with Wawrinka.

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French Open 2017: Defending champion Garbine Muguruza knocked out

Kristina Mladenovic

French Open
Venue: Roland Garros, Paris Dates: 28 May- 11 June
Coverage: Listen to live radio commentary and follow text coverage of selected matches on BBC Radio 5 live sports extra and online.

Defending champion Garbine Muguruza is out of the French Open after losing 6-1 3-6 6-3 to home favourite Kristina Mladenovic.

Spaniard Muguruza only won 15 points in the first set and although she rallied to take it to a third could not match the French 13th seed.

Muguruza’s defeat means that only four of the top 10 seeds remain in the draw.

Caroline Wozniacki, Elina Svitolina and Karolina Pliskova are all safely through after wins on Sunday.

Live scores and schedule

Mladenovic, who won despite serving 16 double faults, was tearful in a post-match interview on a Suzanne-Lenglen Court which had offered passionate support throughout.

No French woman has won the title at Roland Garros since Mary Pierce in 2000.

Mladenovic, 24, will now face Venus Williams or Timea Bacsinzky in the last eight.

Caroline Wozniacki

Former world number one Wozniacki moved into the quarter-finals with a three-set win over Russia’s Svetlana Kuznetsova.

The Dane, 26, had not reached the last eight at Roland Garros since 2010 but came through to win 6-1 4-6 6-2 against the eighth seed and 2009 champion.

Pliskova, the Czech second seed, is into round four after she beat Carina Witthoft of Germany 7-5 6-1.

Fifth seed Svitolina of Ukraine is also safely through to the fourth round after beating Poland’s Magda Linette 6-4 7-5.

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French Open 2017: Rafael Nadal cruises into quarter-finals at Roland Garros

Rafael Nadal

French Open
Venue: Roland Garros, Paris Dates: 28 May- 11 June
Coverage: Listen to live radio commentary and follow text coverage of selected matches on BBC Radio 5 live sports extra and online.

Rafael Nadal continued his superb form with a dominant 6-1 6-2 6-2 win over Roberto Bautista Agut to move easily into the French Open quarter-finals.

The Spaniard, 31, is looking to become the first man to win 10 titles at a single Grand Slam event.

His victory was not quite as simple as Friday’s incredible 6-0 6-1 6-0 defeat of Nikoloz Basilashvili but fourth seed Nadal has not dropped a set yet.

He will now face either Milos Raonic or Pablo Carreno Busta in the last eight.

Margaret Court is the only player to have won 10 or more titles at one Grand Slam event, winning the Australian Open on 11 occasions between 1960 and 1973.

Nine-time winner Nadal now has a 76-2 win-loss record at Roland Garros with his only defeats coming against Robin Soderling in the fourth round in 2009 and Novak Djokovic in the 2015 quarter-finals.

It is the 11th time he has reached the quarter-finals at the French Open – a record shared with Roger Federer.

World number two Djokovic could match that record when he faces Albert Ramos-Vinolas later on Sunday. Djokovic and Nadal are seeded to meet in the semi-finals.

Japan’s eighth seed Kei Nishikori survived a scare to beat unseeded South Korean Hyeon Chung in five sets.

Nishikori, 27, needed almost four hours to win 7-5 6-4 6-7 (4-7) 0-6 6-4 in a third-round match finished on Sunday after the previous day’s rain delay.

“I think the rain helped me a lot, because I was really down in the fourth set and mentally I wasn’t ready,” said Nishikori, whose only Grand Slam final appearance came when he lost at the 2014 US Open.

“I knew I had to change something to beat him, so I think I made some adjustments to make it a little better than yesterday.”

Kei Nishikori

Big-serving American John Isner, seeded 21, was knocked out in his third-round match by Karen Khachanov of Russia, who won 7-6 (7-1) 6-3 6-7 (5-7) 7-6 (7-3).

The 21-year-old will now face British world number one Andy Murray in the fourth round on Monday.

French 15th seed Gael Monfils reached the fourth round for a seventh time when compatriot Richard Gasquet withdrew from their rain-delayed match with a thigh injury.

Monfils, 30, won 7-6 (7-5) 5-7 4-3 to set up a last-16 meeting with third seed Stan Wawrinka.

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Andy Murray column: Beating Del Potro, player box etiquette and life in Paris

Andy Murray

2017 French Open
Venue: Roland Garros, Paris Dates: 28 May-12 June
Coverage: Live radio and text commentary of every Andy Murray match on BBC Radio, the BBC Sport website and BBC Sport app.

It was really good to work things out on court and come through against someone as good as Juan Martin del Potro, after a couple of tournaments worrying about my game and where it was at.

Sometimes it is the case when you play a top player early in a tournament that you’re a bit more focused, a bit more alert.

When you’re going through the tactics for the match it’s maybe a little bit more precise, because you’re aware that if you get it wrong, the best players will make you pay for that.

If you play a guy you don’t really know, it’s difficult to get the right gameplan, so it also helps that I know Juan Martin’s game very well.

We’ve played each other many, many times from juniors right through to the biggest matches as pros.

But he’s still one of the best players in the world, and after struggling with my game and what I was trying to do for a while, rather than actually concentrating on actually trying to beat my opponent, it was great to get things right.

Working things out tactically and making adjustments during matches gives me confidence, so that’s been a real positive for me over the last couple of matches.

‘It’s all about preparing for the next point’

Jamie Delgado and Ivan Lendl

Certain players look up to their box more than others and generally all you would like to see coming back is encouragement.

Everyone’s different in how they watch – Ivan Lendl obviously doesn’t say a lot, Jamie Delgado’s a little bit more vocal, my physical trainer Matt Little and my physio Mark Bender are probably the most vocal in the box in terms of encouragement.

But there’s nothing organised, we don’t sit down and discuss what they do or hand out different roles within the box.

I guess if they were on their phones or looking completely disinterested, or cracking up and having a laugh up there, I would probably find it a bit difficult to concentrate.

In that respect, what the people in your box do could have an impact on your concentration, but from a player’s perspective that time between points is all about preparing for the next one.

What happens during the three or four seconds after a point ends is generally your reaction to winning or losing that point.

You can be very pumped – “great, I’ve won the point” or “damn, I’ve lost the point and just got broken, I’m really upset”.

But you then have another 15 to 20 seconds to either calm yourself down and think about the next one, or spend that time thinking about what just happened – “why did I just get broken serving for the set?”

I don’t feel against Del Potro that was the case at all, and I also feel for large parts of the previous match against Martin Klizan that was a real positive for me as well.

‘I can get back quickly to see the family’

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Last year was the first time at the French Open that we stayed in a house near to the courts, and we’re doing the same again this time.

It’s very relaxed, we can eat at home and watch TV, spend family time together.

We’ve been following all the political debates from home as well the football, like the Europa League and Champions League finals – does that count as watching French TV?

It’s very different in New York, for example, because we stay in the city and it’s really busy.

You’d sign up for 40 minutes getting to the courts, so there’s quite a lot of time spent going to and from the tennis, which makes the days feel a bit longer.

Here, we’re five minutes away and it’s great. I can arrive a bit later and get back quickly to see the family.

It’s not quite Wimbledon, when I get to stay in my own bed every night, but it feels a little bit more like normal home life than the other Slams.

Hopefully I can extend my stay a little longer, I’m not ready to go home quite yet.

Andy Murray was talking to BBC Sport’s Piers Newbery

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Kyle Edmund loses French Open five-setter to Kevin Anderson

Breaking news

French Open
Venue: Roland Garros, Paris Dates: 28 May-11 June
Coverage: Listen to live radio commentary and follow text coverage of selected matches on BBC Radio 5 live sports extra and online.

British number two Kyle Edmund’s French Open campaign came to an end in the third round with a defeat by big-serving Kevin Anderson in five sets.

The South African fought back to win 6-7 (6-8) 7-6 (7-4) 5-7 6-1 6-4 in a near four-hour match.

Edmund, 22, had hoped to match his best Grand Slam run by reaching the last 16, but Anderson’s greater experience told.

“Kyle is a great player and it came down to one or two points,” Anderson, 31, said.

“I’m pleased to be through.”

Anderson, who was a top 10 player before being hampered by a series of injuries, will now meet 2014 US Open champion Marin Cilic in the fourth round.

More to follow.

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Cornet upsets Radwanska to reach fourth round

Alize Cornet

French Open
Venue: Roland Garros, Paris Dates: 28 May- 11 June
Coverage: Listen to live radio commentary and follow text coverage of selected matches on BBC Radio 5 live sports extra and online.

Ninth seed Agnieszka Radwanska was stunned 6-2 6-1 by Alize Cornet in the third round of the French Open.

The French world number 43 won three consecutive games as she won the first set in just 38 minutes.

Polish world number 10 Radwanska won only the first game of the second set Cornet powered to victory, sending 15 winners down to Radwanska’s six.

It is the second time in nine matches that Cornet has beat 2012 Wimbledon runner-up Radwanska.

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