Police Issue Warrant for Brazilian Olympic Committee President

Photo Courtesy: Rio Media

Police in Brazil have issued warrants for the arrest of Brazilian Olympic Committee President Carlos Nuzman and his associate, Arthur Cesar de Menezes Soares Filho, on charges that they were involved in a bribery scandal surrounding the awarding of the 2016 Olympic Games, according to an Associated Press report.

Althought Nuzman’s lawyer, Sergio Mazzillo, has insisted that his client “did not commit any irregularity” and that Nuzman would cooperate, Nuzman was not at home when police searched his house.

Eyewitness reports saw Nuzman and Mazzillo leaving the home before police arrived, and police removed “suitcases, documents and a computer.”

Nuzman, a former International Olympic Committee member, was one of 11 people in either Brazil or France for whom warrants were issued in relation to the awarding of the 2016 Olympics. Police reportedly believe that these officials or former officials bought off the IOC in order to ensure that the Games went to Rio.

Read more from the Associated Press by clicking here.

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Pitt Adds Kendall Goit to Verbal Commitments for Class of 2022

Photo Courtesy: Kendall Goit (Twitter)

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To report a college commitment, email HS@swimmingworld.com.
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NEW COMMIT: Kendall Goit of Club Wolverine has given her verbal commitment to swim at the University of Pittsburgh beginning next fall. She’ll join Dakota Elliott and Madison Nalls in the Pitt Class of 2022.

Goit is a senior at Farmington Hills’ Mercy Hill School. The school finished second at last year’s Michigan High School Girls’ Division 1 state championships. That meet included a fourth place finish in the 200 free and a seventh place touch in the 100 free, both in the form of new lifetime bests for Goit.

Her top times are:

  • 100 Free 52.00
  • 200 Free 1:51.28
  • 100 Fly 57.76

She wrote in her announcement made on Twitter,

“So excited to announce my verbal commitment to swim for the University of Pittsburgh! Hail to Pitt”

Club Wolverine teammates Georgia Mosher and David Cleason have also given verbal commitments to continue their swimming careers in college.

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Swimming World Magazine Presents “Lessons with the Legends: Bob Kiphuth”

Photo Courtesy: International Swimming Hall of Fame

Lessons with the Legends: Bob Kiphuth

Sponsored by Dolfin Swimwear

Swimming World continues a series in which top coaches share some of the secrets of their success. The September issue of Swimming World Magazine highlights the many accomplishments of Coach Bob Kiphuth.

Long before Eddie Reese, Richard Quick, Dave Marsh, Mark Schubert, even George Haines, there was Bob Kiphuth of Yale. Never a college student, he was an avid reader, possessed an astounding book collection and became such a student of life and his aquatic vocation that his storied institution made him a full professor.

He coached at Yale from 1917-59. After taking over the reins from hall of fame coach Matt Mann, he compiled a dual meet record of 528-12, won 38 Eastern Intercollegiate titles and four NCAA national championships. He was part of the Mann (Michigan)-Mike Peppe (Ohio State)-Kiphuth triumvirate whose teams won every NCAA swimming title from 1937 to 1959! Kiphuth coached four U.S. Olympic teams (women in 1928, head coach in 1932 and 1936, and men in 1948). He was also named head coach in 1940, but the Olympics were not held due to war. In 1948, his swimmers won every Olympic event. His squads also earned 14 AAU national team championships.

To learn more about Kiphuth and his many contributions to the sport of swimming, check out the September 2017 issue, available now!

september-17-cover

Not a subscriber?  Subscribe With This Special 3-Year Offer! Swimming World Magazine gives you access to all of the back issues of Swimming World Magazine dating back to 1960!  Visit the Swimming World Magazine Vault.

Order a single “Collectors” issue print copy here or download a single .pdf copy here.

Save 25% on a 1 year subscription and download more issues from the Swimming World Vault and get the following:

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  • A monthly print copy of Swimming World Magazine in the mail for 1 year!
  • Free download of the next 12 issues and the past 12 issues of Swimming World Magazine!
  • Free download of next 24 issues and the past 24 issues of Swimming World Biweekly!
  • Free download of next 4 issues and the past 4 issues of Swimming Technique Magazine!
  • Click Here For This Special Offer with coupon code “realnews“ during checkout.

Take a tour through the current Swimming World Magazine…

FEATURES
010 A RED, WHITE AND BLUE DANUBE WALTZ
by David Rieder, Brent Rutemiller, Taylor Brien and John Lohn
Team USA danced circles around its com­petition in Budapest’s (Hungary) beautiful Duna Arena at the 17th FINA World Cham­pionships, July 23-30. Beginning nine days earlier on July 14, the city came alive, sup­porting all the aquatic sports—open water, diving, high diving, synchronized swimming and water polo.

020 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS PHOTO GALLERY
All photos courtesy of SIPA USA

028 POISE AND CONSISTENCY IN THE LONG BLUE LANE
by Annie Grevers
Men who have been fortunate enough to be a part of the legendary St. Xavier High School swimming tradition in Cincinnati, Ohio know what it means to belong to the “The Long Blue Lane.” But the members of the exclusive group also realize how instru­mental their years as St. X Aquabombers were to their character development.

032 THE X FACTOR
by Annie Grevers
St. Xavier swimmers knew they could do something pretty impressive during the 2016-17 high school season. By “doing the work and putting in the time,” Coach Tim Beerman’s Aquabombers won Swimming World’s boys’ national high school champi­onships, securing its fourth title to go along with team victories in 1973, 1992 and 2001.

036 EMBRACING THE CHALLENGE
by David Rieder
Carmel High School (Ind.) once again won Swimming World’s girls’ national high school championships—for a fifth straight year and for the sixth time in the last seven years.

COACHING
040 LESSONS WITH THE LEGENDS: BOB KIPHUTH
by Michael J. Stott

044 SPECIAL SETS: TRAINING FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY
by Michael J. Stott
This is the first of a two-part series on train­ing for the individual medley, which requires time, sacrifice, incredible endurance and speed to achieve world-class status. This month, Coaches Ted Knapp and Jeff Kostoff share “the Stanford way” of training their IMers. Next month: North Baltimore Aquatic Club coach Paul Yetter will provide some of his IM training secrets.

046 SWIMMING TECHNIQUE MISCONCEPTIONS: STROKE COUNTS
by Rod Havriluk
This month’s article addresses the miscon­ception that a lower stroke count represents a more effective technique. While stroke counts can provide meaning­ful feedback about technique, swimmers often make technique adjustments that lower their stroke count, but do not necessarily make their tech­nique more effective.

049 Q&A WITH COACH JON CARLSON
by Michael J. Stott

050 HOW THEY TRAIN: TANNER SONNEK
by Michael J. Stott

TRAINING
043 DRYSIDE TRAINING: THE IM STROKE SERIES—BREASTSTROKE
by J.R. Rosania

JUNIOR SWIMMER
053 UP & COMERS
by Taylor Brien

COLUMNS
008 A VOICE FOR THE SPORT
048 MOMS AT MEETS
054 GUTTER TALK
056 PARTING SHOT

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Caitlin Hamilton Joins Indiana Swimming Coaching Staff

Indiana University head swimming coach Ray Looze announced the hiring of Caitlin Hamilton to the coaching staff on Monday.

Hamilton will serve as an assistant swimming coach for both the Indiana men’s and women’s teams.

“Caitlin Hamilton brings a wealth of Big Ten experience to our program,” Looze remarked. “In just a few short years, she has established herself and an outstanding deck coach who specializes in technique, motivation, and leadership development. As a swimmer at Purdue, we had the greatest respect for what she accomplished and the challenges she overcame repeatedly. Our staff is excited to add her to what we feel is one of the very special groups of coaches available to swimmers at the NCAA and world class level of swimming. Her addition brings us one step closer to our dual program goals of placing six swimmers and the USA Olympic team in 2020 and winning the NCAA team title.”

Hamilton comes to Bloomington from IUPUI, where she served as an assistant coach for both the men’s and women’s teams, as well as the recruiting coordinator for the women’s team. In 2017, Hamilton helped recruit the highest-ranked class in program history, with the men’s team’s ranked nationally.

“I am honored and excited to become a part of the Indiana University family,” Hamilton said. “I would like to thank Coach Looze, the rest of the staff and the administration for the opportunity to join the program at such an exciting time. I have always admired the commitment to excellence that Indiana Swimming and Diving exemplifies at both the collegiate and international level. It is a great time to be a Hoosier.”

During her two years with the Jaguars, the team set 37 team records, posted six NCAA B time achievements and had two CSCAA Academic All-American teams.

During the 2015-2016 season the Jaguar men finished second and the women finished fourth at the Summit League Championships. Highlighting the Championship was Jon Stoller winning the 200 Breast. Overall the Jaguars broke 19 program records, achieved three NCAA B cuts and Maranda Buha was named a CSCAA Honorable Mention Scholar All American.

Previous to IUPUI, Hamilton worked with the University of Wyoming as an assistant coach of the combined program. While at Wyoming, she coached the mid-distance, distance and individual medley swimmers.

During her tenure, the Cowboys finished third at the Western Athletic Conference Championships (M) and fourth at the Mountain West Conference Championships (W). Overall finishing the year with one NCAA qualifier, four Conference Champions, and eight NCAA B Cuts.

In the previous season, she worked as an undergraduate Assistant Coach for Purdue University. With the Boilers, Hamilton worked mainly with the mid-distance freestyle and individual medley swimmers. The swimmers ended the season with a 25th place finish at NCAAs from seven swimmers qualifying.

The Boilermakers also had a seventh place finish at the Big Ten Championships that year with two program and two freshman records broken. Hamilton also had roles in the Purdue athletic department as an intern for Purdue’s Athletic Development Department, the John Purdue Club.

As a student-athlete at Purdue, Hamilton earned All-America honors in the 1,650 freestyle during the 2009-10 season. She also earned Honorable Mention All-America honors the following season. She was a two-time Second-Team All-Big Ten and three-time Academic All-Big Ten selection. On the national scene, Hamilton was a two-time Olympic Trials qualifier in the 400 and 800-meter freestyle events.

Hamilton graduated from Purdue in the spring of 2014 with degrees in Movement and Sport Science, as well as a degree in Public Health. In the spring of 2017, she graduated with a Masters of Kinesiology from Indiana University.

Press release courtesy of Indiana University.

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2017 FINA World Cup Money List: Sarah Sjostrom, Chad le Clos Lead After Cluster 1

Photo Courtesy: R-Sport / MIA Rossiya Segodnya

This year more than $2 million is up for grabs during a nine-stage, three-cluster FINA/airweave World Cup Series. As the second cluster of the series approaches, Swimming World would like to take a quick look at the money up for grabs this year, as well as the rules of earnings and competition.

Prize money is available to the first through sixth place swimmers, with $10,000 bonuses available for each world record performance. First place winners will earn $1,500, second will earn $1,000, and on down the line. The increased awards equate to $3,900 in prize money for each individual race and $6,000 for each mixed relay event.

The first cluster of the 2017 edition splashed the series into a swift season. An astounding seven new world records were posted by Olympians Sarah Sjostrom, Katinka Hosszu, Ranomi Kromowidjojo, and Mireia Belmonte.

Sjostrom exits the first cluster as the points leader with a total of 266. She spearheaded the world record charge, posting new records in the 50 free, 100 free(x2), and 200 free. Hosszu added a world record of her own in the 100 IM, along with several top swims to finish the cluster in second place with 176 points. Kromowidjojo took back the 50 free world record from Sjostrom less than a week after it was posted, finishing third with 122 points.

On the men’s side, no world records have been posted, but the competition is close! South Africa’s Chad le Clos leads the field with a total of 159 points, while Russian teammates Kirill Prigoda and Vladimir Morozov are tied for second with 93 points each.

World Record Bonuses:

  1. Sarah Sjostrom (SWE) won a world record bonus on day one of competition at the Moscow stop. She turned in a 23.10 in the 50 free to slide past Kromowidjojo’s 23.24.
  2. Sarah Sjostrom (SWE) added a second world record in Moscow, when she slid past Cate Campbell’s 50.91 with a 50.77 in the 100 free.
  3. Katinka Hosszu (HUN) lowered her own world record in the 100 IM while in Berlin. The Hungarian native posted a 56.51 to better her own 56.67.
  4. Ranomi Kromowidjojo (NED) dashed to a new world record in the 50 free, bettering Sjostrom’s young 23.10 with a 22.93.
  5. Sarah Sjostrom continued to shine with a new 100 free world record, lowering her own record of 50.77 to a 50.58.
  6. Sweden’s Sarah Sjostrom extended her world record dominance to the 200 free, posting a 1:50.43 to better her own 1:50.78 from 2014.
  7. Mireia Belmonte of Spain eclipsed the world record in the 400 IM, posting a new time of 4:18.94 to lower Hosszu’s 4:19.46 from 2015.

Three Best Performances (by meet):

Moscow

Men: 

  • Cameron van der Burgh, 100 Breast – 56.30, 963 pts, 24 points
  • Kirill Prigoda, 200 Breast – 2:02.16, 958 pts, 18 points
  • Ilya Shmanovich, 100 Breast – 56.30, 958 pts, 12 points

Kirill Prigoda breaks tie for second with top second-best swim of the meet with a 938 point 100 breast over Ilya Shymanovich’s 922 point 200 breast.

Women:

  • Sarah Sjostrom, 50 Free – 23.10 (WR), 1018 pts, 44 points
  • Ranomi Kromowidjojo, 100 Free – 51.14, 986 pts, 18 points
  • Katinka Hosszu, 100 IM – 57.02, 981 pts, 12 points

Berlin

Men: 

  • Chad le Clos, 200 Fly – 1:49.08, 985 pts, 24 points
  • Vladimir Morozov, 100 Free – 45.23, 980 pts, 18 points
  • Cameron van der Burgh, 50 Breast – 25.49, 972 pts, 12 points

Women:

  • Ranomi Kromowidjojo, 50 Free – 22.93 (WR), 1041 pts, 44 points
  • Sarah Sjostrom, 50 Free – 23.00, 1031 pts, 18 points
  • Katinka Hosszu, 100 IM – 56.51 (WR), 1008 pts, 12 points

Eindhoven

Men:

  • Chad le Clos, 200 Fly – 1:48.67, 996 pts, 24 points
  • Vladimir Morozov, 100 IM – 50.70, 976 pts, 18 points
  • Kirill Prigoda, 200 Breast – 2:02.15, 958 pts, 12 points

Women:

  • Sarah Sjostrom, 100 Free – 50.58, 1019 pts, 44 points
  • Mireia Belmonte, 400 IM – 4:18.94, 1006 pts, 18 points
  • Alia Atkinson, 100 Breast – 1:02.67, 985 pts, 12 points

Cluster 1 Bonuses (Moscow, Berlin, Eindhoven): USD $300,000

Men: 

  • Chad le Clos, 159 points, $50,000
  • Vladimir Morozov, 93 points *, $35,000
  • Kirill Prigoda, 93 points, $30,000
  • Tom Shields, 75 points, $20,000
  • Masaki Kaneko, 51 points, $10,000
  • Philip Heintz, 48 points, $5,000

*Vladimir Morozov wins tiebreaker with Kirill Prigoda by earning the most medal points at one stop in the first cluster. He finished the Eindhoven stop with a best of 33 points versus Prigoda’s best of 30.

Women:

  • Sarah Sjostrom, 266 points, $50,000
  • Katinka Hosszu, 176 points, $35,000
  • Ranomi Kromowidjojo, 122 points, $30,000
  • Mireia Belmonte, 84 points *, $20,000
  • Alia Atkinson, 84 points, $10,000
  • Emily Seebohm, 78 points, $5,000

*Mireia Belmote wins tiebreaker with Alia Atkinson due to her 400 IM world record posted in Eindhoven.

Overall/Cluster Scoring Explained:

The FINA Points Table will be used as the basis for deciding the ranking of swimmers at each Event according to the following:

By Meet:
1. Three best performances (according to the FINA Points Table), with the following score:
Best performance: 24 points
2nd best performance: 18 points
3rd best performance: 12 points
– In case of tie, the second best performance is taken into account (as per the present rules)

2. Medallists in all individual events, with the following score:
Gold medal: 12 points
Silver medal: 9 points
Bronze medal: 6 points

3. Bonus for World Record performance: 20 points

By Cluster:
1. The ranking will be established by adding all the Performance, Ranking (medallist) and WR points
– In case of tie with one of the swimmer having a WR performance: first is the swimmer with WR performance.
– In case of tie with both swimmers having WR performance: first is the swimmer with best WR performance (in accordance to the FINA Points Table).
– In case of tie with Performance and Ranking points: first is the swimmer with the higher number of Ranking points.
– In case of tie with Ranking points: first is the swimmer with the higher number of Ranking points in any of the cluster’s leg.

2. To win cluster points, a swimmer MUST compete on all stops of that cluster.

Overall:
1. Sum all the Cluster Points
– In case of tie, first is the swimmer with the best position in any of the clusters.

World Record Bonus points: For each new World Record, 20 bonus points will be awarded to the swimmer in addition to any ranking points earned at the Event. For any World Record equalled, 10 bonus points will be awarded to the swimmer in addition to any ranking points earned at the Event.

The swimmers accumulating the most points at the SWC Events in each year shall be declared the overall winners for both Men and Women.

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Top Four Post Practice Snacks To Help Recovery

Photo Courtesy: Maxpixel

By Jason Tillotson, Swimming World College Intern.

Swimmers know all too well the feeling of depletion and exhaustion after two long practices, plus dry land training, weights, stretching and more each day. Without proper nutrition a swimmer’s body can actually become weaker, while under intense training and if not carefully looked after, swimmer’s can lose very unhealthy amounts of weight over short periods of time.

In order to ensure that swimmers stay healthy and fit, under extremely demanding training periods, it is imperative that one takes care of their body and closely monitors what they put in. The best way to think of a swimmer’s body is like a motor vehicle. The better the fuel grade, the better the car will run, and for longer. If you put unhealthy food in, you get undesirable results in both training and in racing. Now, of course, we all know the famous stories of world record holder Ryan Lochte eating McDonalds for many meals during the Beijing Olympic Games, but that is not the case for many.

Most athletic nutritionists agree that minutes after completely each workout, one should replenish the calories and energy burned during the workout. Within the next hour, one should eat again in preparation for the next workout. Swimmers are known for having tight and busy schedules as well, which calls for a lot of snacking, and, when done well,

Here are five great snacks to have after each practice that help ensure quick, long lasting recovery.

Greek Yogurt.

greek-yogurt

Photo Courtesy: Flickr

Greek yogurt typically doesn’t have too much sugar in it, which is always good. With an average of 17 grams of protein, Greek yogurt can help replenish muscle fibers quickly to aide in both recovery and muscle growth.

Fruit.

misc_fruit

Photo Courtesy: Sandy Austin

Bananas are go-to anti-crap food for swimmers, and for good reasons. The potassium and proteins in bananas are key to helping muscle fibers fire quickly and without error. Some other fruits like kiwi and pineapple can help heal minor injuries in the short term, since they have natural sugars, loads of anti-oxidants and simple carbohydrates.

Eggs.

james-bowe-eggs-breakfast

Photo Courtesy: James Bowe

Any style and type of eggs are good for quick muscle recovery. Adding veggies to an egg-white omelet is just one example of a tasty way to gain back some of the many calories lost while training. Vegetables add some balance to the eggs in terms of the carbohydrates to protein ratio.

Chocolate Milk.

chocolate-milk

Photo Courtesy: Flickr

Chocolate milk has been a staple recovery tool for swimmers for decades. Olympian Tyler Clary talks about how chocolate milk helps replenish glycogen in the muscles and creates for a perfect carb to protein ratio. Not only does chocolate milk help replenish the muscles but it also helps build stronger muscle fibers, after each workout.

Trying any combination of these quick and easy snacks will help guarantee a speedy recovery in between or after taxing training sessions.

All commentaries are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Swimming World Magazine nor its staff.

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Qin Haiyang Demolishes Own World Junior Record in 200 Breast

Chinese breaststroker Qin Haiyang finished well under his own World Junior Record in the men’s 200 breast final at the China National Games in Tanjim.

Qin came in at 2:07.35, more than two seconds quicker than his previous mark of 2:09.39 from the World Championships in July. That mark made him the ninth-fastest performer in history in the event and the fourth-fastest man this year.

He would have won a bronze medal at Worlds with that effort, while Qin actually did not make the final at Worlds, finishing 15th after setting his previous WJR in prelims.

Find results by clicking here.

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2017 Men’s Water Polo Preview: Mid-Atlantic Water Polo Conference

Bucknell’s Rade Joksimovic. Phoro Courtesy Bucknell Athletics

Swimming World’s Michael Randazzo will provide previews of the conferences that will send teams to the 2017 NCAA Men’s Water Polo Tournament to be held December 2 and 3 at USC’s Uytengsu Aquatics Center. Teams arranged by projected order of finish.

Rankings are from the 2017 Collegiate Water Polo Association’s Men’s Preseason Poll.

The Mid-Atlantic Water Polo Conference (MAWPC)—perhaps a reincarnation of the Mid-Atlantic Conference launched in the early 1970’s by Dick Russell, Bucknell’s legendary swim and water polo coach—is product of the Collegiate Water Polo Association’s 2016 realignment. Consisting of two divisions, its East bracket—with Bucknell, Fordham, George Washington, Johns Hopkins, the U.S. Naval Academy and Wagner—is far more competitive than in the West, populated by DIII programs unlikely to qualify for NCAAs.

The MAWPC East membership directly reflects the former CWPA Southern Division, with the defection of Princeton—now in the Northeast Water Polo Conference (NWPC)—and the addition of former CWPA Northern Division resident Fordham. Perhaps it’s fitting that Bucknell was crowned last year as the first-ever MAWPC champion. Led by Rade Joksimovic, perhaps the East’s most dynamic player—the Bison are favored to repeat again in 2017.

Bucknell

Preseason polls have #14 Bucknell (23-5, 9-1) as a safe bet to follow last year’s path to an NCAA play-in game berth—ideally with the result being that this season the Bison get past the NWPC champion to arrive in Los Angeles having climbed the first rung of the NCAA tournament ladder. Joksimovic—who in his first year in Lewisburg tied Bucknell legend Scott Schulte for second on the program’s single-season list with 154 goals—is as exciting a player as any seen in the East since Svetozar Stefanovic (Brown 2012), named All-American four straight seasons.

But head coach John McBride’s (7th season; 1992 Rhode Island) team is no one trick pony. Sophomore Logan Schofield (15 goals) was selected to the USA Men’s Junior National Team that competed this summer at the FINA Junior World Championships. Senior goalie Charlie Niehaus has been a rock in the Bucknell goal, with 53 straight starts entering the 2017 season. Senior center Jeff Hagan (38 goals) provides a strong compliment at set for the sharpshooting Joksimovic. Major Loss: Nate Hunter (42 goals)

Key Matchup: George Washington, Saturday, October 7, Lewisburg, PA

GW

If there was one team that greatly exceeded expectations last year, it was #18 George Washington. The Colonials (15-12; 8-2 MSWPC) finished second to Bucknell on the leadership of Bogdan Petkovic (57 goals) and coaching of Adam Foley, named the 2016 Dick Russell Coach of the Year.

Petkovic graduated last spring and Barry King (1st season; 1988 Fresno State) was brought in to replace Foley, who resigned abruptly last May after two years at GW. Luckily, King inherits a program that retain three of its top four scoring threats, including super sophomore Atakan Destici (82 goals, 45 assists, 87 steals). The Istanbul native led the Colonials in all major offensive categories as he teamed with Petkovic to form a potent one-two punch. Senior Pierce Deamer (45 goals, 71 exclusions drawn) and sophomore Andrew Mavis (39 goals, 48 exclusion drawn) will anchor the offensive set while junior goalie Matt Taylor—a 2016 first team All-MAWPC selection—returns to backstop the defense. Major Loss: Head Coach Foley.

Key Matchup: Johns Hopkins, Friday, October 20, Washington D.C.

johns-hopkins

Two years ago, Johns Hopkins appeared ready to ascend to the top of the East. A fantastic run in the 2015 Men’s CWPA Championship title match, which ended with a 7-6 loss to Princeton, promised a great future for Ted Bresnehan’s (26th season; 1980 Kentucky) team.

Then came last season. The Blue Jays dropped their first seven matches on their way to a dismal 5-19 (4-6 MAWPC) season. Wiping the slate clean for 2017, they bring in six freshmen while welcoming back former George Washington coach Adam Foley as an assistant. Also returning are senior John Wilson, a stalwart in the Johns Hopkins goal the past three years, leading scorer junior Giorgio Cico (56 goals, 35 assists) and senior Juno Gillette (28 goals, 21 assists). Major Loss: Matt Fraser (37 goals, 59 ejections drawn).

Key Matchup: Bucknell, Saturday, September 23, Baltimore, MD

fordham

The move to a southern climate has done wonders for Fordham (16-13, 4-6 MAWPC). Bill Harris (14th season; 1968 St. Francis Brooklyn) saw his team claim third place in the 2016 MAWPC tournament behind the capable right arm of senior R.J. Simmons (49 goals). Sophomore Jake Miller-Tolt (61 goals, 31 assists, 77 steals) returns after a break out season that saw him collect 2nd Team MAWPC All-East Division honors in 2016. Senior Alex Jahns will again man the Rams’ nets, as he has the past two seasons. Major Loss: Simmons.

Key Matchup: St. Francis Brooklyn, Saturday, November 11, Bronx, NY

navy

For much of the past three decades, the U. S. Naval Academy has dominated Eastern polo, earning 14 NCAA appearances. If the Middies are to get to another tournament, they will have to rebound quickly from a disappointing 2016 season that saw them go 8-18 (2-8 MAWPC). Returning for his senior year is center Jared Castillo (43 goals, 45 exclusions drawn). He’ll look to jump-start an offense that lost three of its four top goal scorers including David Huber (63 goals). Coach Mladen Stanicic (3rd season; 1981 Split University) has 16 underclassmen—including seven freshmen—on which to rebuild this once proud program. Major loss: Huber.

Key Matchup: Wagner, Sunday, October 1, Annapolis, MD

wagner

In their first season in NCAA varsity polo—with a roster consisting of 13 freshmen, two sophomores and a junior—Chris Radmonovich’s (2nd season, 2002 Houston) Wagner College Seahawks posted an impressive 10-22 record (3-7 MAWPC). Senior captain Ciaran Wolohan (68 goals, 37 steals) was named to the 2016 All-Mid-Atlantic Water Polo Conference-East Region 1st Team while sophomore Oscar Nomura (49 goals) was a second team selection. With 12 more players this season—including a new goalie, Cameron Woldt—the Seahawks will again look to upset the hierarchy of Eastern polo as they seek to move up the conference ranks. Major Loss: goalie Joseph Ferraro

Key Matchup: Johns Hopkins, Sunday, November 5, Staten Island, NY

All commentaries are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Swimming World Magazine nor its staff.

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Swimming World Presents a “Red, White, & Blue Danube Waltz”

Photo Courtesy: SIPA USA

Red, White, and Blue Danube Waltz

Team USA danced circles around its competition in Budapest’s (Hungary) beautiful Duna Arena at the 17th FINA World Championships, July 23-30. Beginning nine days earlier on July 14, the city came alive, supporting all the aquatic sports—open water, diving, high diving, synchronized swimming and water polo.

No matter how anyone analyzed the meet, everyone agreed: it was a total domination by the Americans…just as they had done the previous year at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro:

  • Gold Medals: 18 — more than four times more than the next nation
  • Silver Medals: 10 — twice as many as its nearest pursuer
  • Bronze Medals: 10 — six more than the runners-up
  • Total Medals: 38 — nearly four times more than China, Russia and Australia with 10
  • World Records: 6 — three times more than runner-up Sweden and Great Britain

To learn more about the 2017 FINA World Championships and read features on Caeleb Dressel, Katie Ledecky, Lilly King, Emily Seebohm, and more, check out the September 2017 issue, available now!

september-17-cover

Not a subscriber?  Subscribe With This Special 3-Year Offer! Swimming World Magazine gives you access to all of the back issues of Swimming World Magazine dating back to 1960!  Visit the Swimming World Magazine Vault.

Order a single “Collectors” issue print copy here or download a single .pdf copy here.

Save 25% on a 1 year subscription and download more issues from the Swimming World Vault and get the following:

  • Use Coupon Code: realnews and save 25%
  • A monthly print copy of Swimming World Magazine in the mail for 1 year!
  • Free download of the next 12 issues and the past 12 issues of Swimming World Magazine!
  • Free download of next 24 issues and the past 24 issues of Swimming World Biweekly!
  • Free download of next 4 issues and the past 4 issues of Swimming Technique Magazine!
  • Click Here For This Special Offer with coupon code “realnews“ during checkout.

Take a tour through the current Swimming World Magazine…

FEATURES
010 A RED, WHITE AND BLUE DANUBE WALTZ
by David Rieder, Brent Rutemiller, Taylor Brien and John Lohn
Team USA danced circles around its com­petition in Budapest’s (Hungary) beautiful Duna Arena at the 17th FINA World Cham­pionships, July 23-30. Beginning nine days earlier on July 14, the city came alive, sup­porting all the aquatic sports—open water, diving, high diving, synchronized swimming and water polo.

020 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS PHOTO GALLERY
All photos courtesy of SIPA USA

028 POISE AND CONSISTENCY IN THE LONG BLUE LANE
by Annie Grevers
Men who have been fortunate enough to be a part of the legendary St. Xavier High School swimming tradition in Cincinnati, Ohio know what it means to belong to the “The Long Blue Lane.” But the members of the exclusive group also realize how instru­mental their years as St. X Aquabombers were to their character development.

032 THE X FACTOR
by Annie Grevers
St. Xavier swimmers knew they could do something pretty impressive during the 2016-17 high school season. By “doing the work and putting in the time,” Coach Tim Beerman’s Aquabombers won Swimming World’s boys’ national high school champi­onships, securing its fourth title to go along with team victories in 1973, 1992 and 2001.

036 EMBRACING THE CHALLENGE
by David Rieder
Carmel High School (Ind.) once again won Swimming World’s girls’ national high school championships—for a fifth straight year and for the sixth time in the last seven years.

COACHING
040 LESSONS WITH THE LEGENDS: BOB KIPHUTH
by Michael J. Stott

044 SPECIAL SETS: TRAINING FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY
by Michael J. Stott
This is the first of a two-part series on train­ing for the individual medley, which requires time, sacrifice, incredible endurance and speed to achieve world-class status. This month, Coaches Ted Knapp and Jeff Kostoff share “the Stanford way” of training their IMers. Next month: North Baltimore Aquatic Club coach Paul Yetter will provide some of his IM training secrets.

046 SWIMMING TECHNIQUE MISCONCEPTIONS: STROKE COUNTS
by Rod Havriluk
This month’s article addresses the miscon­ception that a lower stroke count represents a more effective technique. While stroke counts can provide meaning­ful feedback about technique, swimmers often make technique adjustments that lower their stroke count, but do not necessarily make their tech­nique more effective.

049 Q&A WITH COACH JON CARLSON
by Michael J. Stott

050 HOW THEY TRAIN: TANNER SONNEK
by Michael J. Stott

TRAINING
043 DRYSIDE TRAINING: THE IM STROKE SERIES—BREASTSTROKE
by J.R. Rosania

JUNIOR SWIMMER
053 UP & COMERS
by Taylor Brien

COLUMNS
008 A VOICE FOR THE SPORT
048 MOMS AT MEETS
054 GUTTER TALK
056 PARTING SHOT

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Worlds Team Member Cathryn Salladin Verbally Commits to Alabama

Photo Courtesy: Cathryn Salladin (Instagram @catsally)

NEW COMMIT: The University of Alabama now has a distance duo verbally committed for the Class of 2022. Open Water worlds team member Cathryn Salladin has given her verbal commitment to the Tide, joining Bolles’ Kensey McMahon.

Salladin is from Anaheim, California where she swims for Fullerton’s FAST Swim Team and is a senior at Esperanza High School.

McMahon and Salladin have both seen significant drops in the past year and are set up to be great training partners. They sit a mere two seconds apart in the 1650 while McMahon has the upper hand in the 200 and Salladin leads the way in the 500 free.

Salladin’s top SCY times are:

  • 200 Free 1:51.77
  • 500 Free 4:44.56
  • 1000 Free 9:40.47
  • 1650 Free 16:14.98

At the 2017 SEC Championships Salladin would have been a 500 freestyle B finalist and sixth in the mile. While her pool swimming is strong, Salladin has earned more accolades in open water. At the 2017 USA Swimming Open Water championships Salladin finished sixth in the 10K with a 2:06:47.58. With that performance she qualified for World Championships where she finished tenth in the 25K in Budapest.

In her announcement made on Instagram Salladin wrote,

“I better start practicing my y’alls, cause I’m Bama bound!!! So thankful for my family, friends, teammates and coaches both past and present for helping me achieve my goals. I’m so excited for this new adventure! #committed”

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