2020 Ryder Cup: Richard Scudamore named on new European Tour committee

Richard Scudamore

Former Premier League chief executive Richard Scudamore has been named on the European Tour’s Ryder Cup committee.

The position is Scudamore’s first paid role since leaving the Premier League at the end of 2018.

The new committee has been tasked with boosting the Ryder Cup’s commercial value before the 2020 event in the USA.

“The success of the 2018 Ryder Cup demonstrated the global appeal of the modern-day Ryder Cup,” said European Tour chairman David Williams.

“But there remains significant growth potential. This committee will look at ways of optimising that while also protecting the contest’s rich heritage.”

The committee also includes Paul McGinley, winning captain at the 2014 Ryder Cup, and Ian Ritchie, the former chief executive of the Rugby Football Union and the All England Lawn Tennis Club and current chairman of the Gallagher Premiership.

Go to Source

‘I need a few good weeks’ – Dimmock chasing Solheim Cup spot

Annabel Dimmock playing out of a bunker

England’s Annabel Dimmock is hoping to further her claims for a place on Europe’s Solheim Cup team at this week’s Ladies European Thailand Open.

The 22-year-old won the Jabra Ladies Open in May and victory this week could see her rise to 12th on the ranking list with three qualification events to follow.

Europe host the United States at Gleneagles from 13-15 September.

“I need to have a few good weeks to get in,” said Dimmock.

“At the start of the year, I was playing well but it wasn’t within my sights.

“If I am going to get in it would probably need a captain’s pick on form.”

Europe captain Catriona Matthew will announce her 12-strong Solheim Cup team after the final qualifying event – the Ladies Scottish Open – which finishes on 11 August.

Before that there are two other opportunities for players to claim a spot – the Evian Championship and the Women’s British Open.

Eight players qualify automatically, with Matthew making four wildcard picks.

Dimmock, who played in the 2014 European Junior Ryder Cup team, added: “I need to keep playing well but I can’t think about that too much because I want to focus on my golf and then everything else takes care of itself.”

The Ladies European Thailand Open starts on Thursday, with fellow Solheim Cup hopefuls Meghan MacLaren, Marianne Skarpnord, Esther Henseleit and Karolin Lampert all in the field.

Go to Source

Woodland wins first major at US Open as Rose fades

Breaking news

US Open final leaderboard
-13 G Woodland (US); -10 B Koepka (US); -7 J Rose (Eng), X Schauffele (US), J Rahm (Spa), C Reavie (US); -6 A Scott (Aus), L Oosthuizen (SA); -5 R McIlroy (NI), H Stenson (Swe), C Hadley (US)
Selected others: -4 M Fitzpatrick (Eng), M Wallace (Eng), D Willett; -3 G McDowell (NI); -2 T Woods (US), P Casey (Eng), T Hatton (Eng); -1 S Lowry (Ire)

American Gary Woodland held off the challenge of world number one Brooks Koepka to claim his first major victory at the 119th US Open at Pebble Beach.

The world number 25 shot a two-under 69 to win by three on 13 under from two-time defending champion Koepka.

Woodland, 35, led all the way from the end of the second round in California.

England’s Justin Rose was in contention and took a share of the lead with an opening birdie on Sunday, but fell away with a 74 to finish on seven under par.

The 38-year-old world number four, aiming to win the second major of his career after his 2013 US Open success, carded five bogeys as he finished tied for third with Spain’s Jon Rahm and Americans Xander Schauffele and Chez Reavie.

Northern Ireland’s Rory McIlroy endured a turbulent final day that included double bogeys at the second and 16th, but finished with a birdie to climb inside the top 10 at five under par.

Englishmen Matt Wallace, Danny Willett and Matt Fitzpatrick all ended a further stroke back.

More to follow.

Go to Source

US Open tee times: Rose, Woods, McIlroy, Koepka tee times at Pebble Beach

Brooks Koepka

US Open
Date: 13-16 June Venue: Pebble Beach, California
Coverage: Live text commentary on BBC Sport website and commentary on BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra

Final round (all times BST)

American unless stated.

15:21 Michael Thorbjornsen (a)

15:32 Bernd Wiesberger (Aut), Justin Walters (SA)

15:43 Cameron Smith (Aus), Chip McDaniel

15:54 Charlie Danielson, Luke Donald (Eng)

16:05 Kyle Stanley, Zach Johnson

16:16 Kevin Kisner, Andy Pope

16:27 Marcus Kinhult (Swe), Brian Stuard

16:38 Rafa Cabrera Bello (Spa), Brandt Snedeker

16:49 Clement Sordet (Fra), Daniel Berger

17:00 Andrew Putnam, Adri Arnaus (Spa)

17:11 Tommy Fleetwood (Eng), Aaron Wise

17:22 Sepp Straka (Aut), Harris English

17:33 Phil Mickelson, Charles Howell III

17:44 Emiliano Grillo (Arg), Rory Sabbatini (Svk)

17:55 Billy Hurley III, Bryson DeChambeau

18:06 Collin Morikawa, Erik van Rooyen (SA)

18:17 Patrick Reed, Carlos Ortiz (Mex)

18:28 Paul Casey (Eng), Webb SImpson

18:39 Chandler Eaton (a), Tom Hoge

18:50 Martin Kaymer (Ger), Rhys Enoch (Wal)

19:01 Sergio Garcia (Spa), Jordan Spieth

19:12 Jason Dufner, Billy Horschel

19:23 Rickie Fowler, Alex Prugh

19:34 Nick Taylor (Can), Shane Lowry (Ire)

19:45 Haotong Li (Chn), Viktor Hovland (Nor) (a)

19:56 Tiger Woods, Marc Leishman (AUs)

20:07 Jason Day (Aus), Tyrrell Hatton (Eng)

20:18 Jim Furyk, Matt Fitzpatrick (Eng)

20:29 HIdeki Matsuyama (Jpn), Patrick Cantlay

20:40 Scott Piercy, Francesco Molinari (Ita)

20:51 Dustin Johnson, Brandon Wu (a)

21:02 Nate Lashley, Abraham Ancer (Mex)

21:13 Adam Scott (Aus), Xander Schauffele

21:24 Byeong Hun An (Kor), Matt Wallace (Eng)

21:35 Henrik Stenson (Swe), Jon Rahm

21:46 Graeme McDowell (NI), Danny Willett (Eng)

21:57 Chesson Hadley, Matt Kuchar

22:08 Rory McIlroy (NI), Louis Oosthuizen (SA)

22:19 Chez Reavie, Brooks Koepka

22:30 Justin Rose (Eng), Gary Woodland

Go to Source

US Open: Justin Rose trails Gary Woodland by one, Rory McIlroy in contention

Justin Rose

Third-round leaderboard
-11 G Woodland (US); -10 J Rose (Eng); -7 B Koepka (US), C Reavie (US); L Oosthuizen (SA); -6 R McIlroy (NI); -5 M Kuchar (US), C Hadley
Selected others: -4 D Willett (Eng), G McDowell (NI), J Rahm (Spa), M Wallace (Eng); -2 D Johnson (US); -1 M Fitzpatrick (Eng); Level T Woods (US), T Hatton (Eng).

England’s Justin Rose sits one shot off the lead held by American Gary Woodland heading into the final day of the 119th US Open at Pebble Beach.

The 2013 champion rolled in a birdie at the 18th to move to 10 under par after an enthralling day in California.

World number one Brooks Koepka, chasing a third successive US Open victory, is three further back with Chez Reavie and Louis Oosthuizen at seven under par.

Rory McIlroy birdie the last to card a one-under 70 and reach six under.

Fellow Northern Irishman Graeme McDowell, US Open winner at this venue in 2010, holed an eagle putt at the last to improve his score to four under.

England’s Danny Willett earlier shot the round of the day with a 67 but Masters champion Tiger Woods was left frustrated by a level par offering that included five birdies and as many bogeys.

World number two Dustin Johnson looked set to make his move after successive birdies on the third and fourth holes, only for the 2016 champion to immediately drop a shot and a bogey at 16 left him at two under for the tournament, alongside reigning Open champion Francesco Molinari.

But on another cool, overcast day by the Pacific Ocean things were beginning to hot up in the field as Woodland opened his lead to four strokes before Rose reeled the world number 25 back in.

Koepka missed numerous birdie opportunities to close the gap himself but still managed to card his best round of the week with a bogey-free 68 and said afterwards he will “enjoy the pressure” of trying to win a fifth major on Sunday.

In a dramatic few minutes, Woodland saved par with a chip-in from the fringes at the par-three 12th, Rose drained a birdie putt on the same hole and Koepka scrambled for a par of his own with a mammoth putt at the 15th.

Woodland holed another huge par-saver from more than 40 feet at the 14th but Rose stepped up to close the gap to two with a birdie, while Koepka was left having to navigate the tree in the middle of the 18th fairway – he eventually made par to sign for a bogey-free three-under 68.

Woodland, whose had only his second bogey in three rounds at the eighth on Saturday, missed a birdie putt at the last and then saw Rose sink his own effort to move within one stroke of the lead.

More to follow.

Go to Source

US Open: Justin Rose leads, Koepka in contention, McIlroy among late starters

Justin Rose

England’s Justin Rose set the clubhouse lead at the US Open by carding a one-under 70 in round two at Pebble Beach.

Overnight leader Rose, the winner in 2013, had three birdies and two bogeys and leads by two on seven under.

American Brooks Koepka, who is chasing a third successive US Open title, carded a 69 to finish on four under, while Tiger Woods bogeyed his last two holes to drop back to level par.

Northern Ireland’s Rory McIlroy is among the later starters.

The 2011 US Open champion shot a three-under 68 on day one.

American Aaron Wise concluded his round with consecutive birdies to post a level-par 71 to be Rose’s nearest challenger on five under.

Fellow Americans Rickie Fowler and Xander Schauffele and Louis Oosthuizen of South Africa all start their second rounds on five under par.

Despite making five birdies, England’s Ian Poulter, looks set to miss the cut for the third time in his last five majors after finishing on four over par.

The 43-year-old’s hopes of making the weekend were torpedoed by a quadruple bogey eight on the third hole.

More to follow.

Go to Source

McIlroy in contention as three set clubhouse lead

Rory McIlroy

US Open, early first-round leaderboard
-5 R Fowler (US), X Schauffele (US); -4 S Piercy (US); -3 R McIlroy (NI)*, S Straka (US)*, E Grillo (Arg);
Selected others:-2 J Rahm (Spa)*, G McDowell (NI); -1 T Hatton (Eng); Level D Johnson (US), D Willett (Eng)*;+1 L Donald (Eng)*,

Rory McIlroy is two shots off the early clubhouse lead at the US Open in benign day one conditions at Pebble Beach.

The Northern Irishman, winner in 2011, recovered from a bogey on his opening hole to finish with a three-under 68.

American Xander Schauffele had an eagle at the last to join compatriot Rickie Fowler and South Africa’s Louis Oostuizen in the lead on five under.

Brooks Koepka, who is chasing a third successive US Open title, is among the later starters with Tiger Woods.

World number one Koepka tees off at 21:47 BST, with 2019 Masters winner Woods out alongside fellow former champions Jordan Spieth and England’s Justin Rose at 22:09.

Northern Ireland’s Graeme McDowell, who won the US Open at Pebble in 2010, was the only one of the early starters to post a bogey-free round and at two under he is one stroke ahead of Tyrrell Hatton.

Englishman Hatton, who recorded his best finish at a US Open when he finished joint sixth last year, climbed to four under par without dropping a shot in his first 15 holes, but finished with three successive bogeys.

McIlroy makes fast start

McIlroy was among the early starters and he made the most of benign conditions in California as he began his round from the 10th tee alongside Spain’s Jon Rahm and Australian Marc Leishman.

The world number three has carded opening rounds in the 60s in all four of his major victories, going on to win the 2011 US Open by eight strokes at Congressional, but the last of those wins came five years ago.

He brushed off a dropped shot at his first hole to birdie the 13th and par-three 17th, as well as scrambling for par at 18, as he hit the turn at one under.

McIlroy then holed from 12 feet for his third birdie of the day at the second and immediately backed it up with another to move to three under par.

It could have been three in a row had the 30-year-old’s birdie putt not stayed up after clipping the cup at the fourth, before McIlroy saved another par on the par-three fifth by rolling in from the fringes of the green with the flag still in after a duffed chip from the rough.

McIlroy, who started his wins at the 2011 US Open, 2012 US PGA Championship, 2014 Open Championship and 2014 US PGA with rounds of 65, 67, 66 and 66 respectively, said he was “really pleased” to open with a 68.

“It’s tough starting on that 10th in the morning,” he told Sky Sports. “I came back well and didn’t make a bogey.

“It’s benign conditions, very soft for a US Open, so you needed to get out there and shoot something in the 60s. I’m happy with my day’s work.”

Playing partner Rahm opened his US Open campaign with three successive birdies but eventually finished at two under alongside Leishman.

American Scott Piercy had set the pace by posting a four-under-par 67 that included five birdies, an eagle, a double bogey and further bogey at the 18th.

Go to Source

Koepka grouped with Molinari as American seeks third straight US Open

Brooks Koepka

US Open
Date: 13-16 June Venue: Pebble Beach, California
Coverage: Live text commentary on BBC Sport website and commentary on BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra

World number one Brooks Koepka starts his quest to win a third successive US Open at 21:47 BST on Thursday, 13 June.

The American plays the first two rounds at Pebble Beach with Open champion Francesco Molinari and US Amateur champion Viktor Hovland from Norway.

Three-time winner Tiger Woods, who won his 15th major at the Masters in April, is playing with 2015 champion Jordan Spieth and Justin Rose, victor in 2013.

Northern Ireland’s Rory McIlroy is out with Jon Rahm and Marc Leishman.

McIlroy is among the favourites to add to his 2011 US Open triumph, and win a fifth major, after claiming the Canadian Open title last week.

His compatriot Graeme McDowell – who won this title when it was last played at the California course in 2010 – is grouped with American world number two Dustin Johnson, who won his solitary major at the 2016 US Open, and five-time major champion Phil Mickelson.

Selected first-round tee times (full list at bottom of page)

Starting on first (all times BST)

21:47 – Francesco Molinari (Ita), Viktor Hovland (a) (Nor), Brooks Koepka (US)

21:58 – Tony Finau (US), Jimmy Walker (US), Ian Poulter (Eng)

22:09 – Jordan Spieth (US), Justin Rose (Eng), Tiger Woods (US)

Starting on 10th

15:51 – Jon Rahm (Spa), Marc Leishman (Aus), Rory McIlroy (NI)

16:13 – Dustin Johnson (US), Phil Mickelson (US), Graeme McDowell (NI)

16:24 – Hideki Matsuyama (Jpn), Sergio Garcia (Spa), Tommy Fleetwood (Eng)

Five Americans to watch

Tiger Woods putting on his Green Jacket

It’s hard to look beyond Koepka winning the third of the year’s four majors. He has won four of the past eight majors he has played in and is looking to become just the second man to win three successive US Open titles – the only other to do so is Scotland’s Willie Anderson from 1903-05.

The 29-year-old retained his US PGA Championship last month and finished runner-up at the Masters in April.

Don’t rule out Woods though. The 43-year-old, who is back up to fifth in the world rankings, ended an 11-year major drought by triumphing for the fifth time at Augusta National, and while he missed the cut at the US PGA in May, he won his first US Open title at Pebble Beach in 2000 – and by a record 15 shots.

The American would join Anderson, Bobby Jones, Ben Hogan, and Jack Nicklaus as a four-time winner.

Woods’ great rival Mickelson arrives on the California coast still looking for a first US Open victory on a course where he has had much success throughout his career.

He won the Pebble Beach Pro-Am earlier this year, for a joint-record fifth time, but the course set-up will be much tougher this week and that is unlikely to suit his erratic driving game.

The left-hander, a six-time US Open runner-up, would become the oldest major winner were he to win on his 49th birthday on Sunday.

Dustin Johnson has an incredible recent record at his national championship. The 34-year-old finally won the tournament in 2016 after near misses in 2014 and 2015, when he finished joint fourth and joint second respectively, while he finished third last year.

And Johnson is in fine form in the majors this year, with second-place finishes at both the Masters and US PGA.

Rickie Fowler is widely regarded as the best player not to have won a major. He is often in the mix, only to fall away as the heat is turned up or throw in a bad run of holes.

He has 10 major top-10s including second at the 2018 Masters, putting him at the top of the list of active players never to have won a major.

Five Europeans to watch

Rory McIlroy celebrates winning the Canadian Open

McIlroy will be acutely aware that the last of his four major victories came almost five years ago, at the US PGA.

Since then, he’s had nine top-10 finishes in the 18 majors he’s played in – without ever really threatening to win one.

The 30-year-old, who won the 2011 US Open, has missed the cut the last three times, but comes into this year’s tournament buoyed by his seven-shot win at last week’s Canadian Open.

Tommy Fleetwood finished runner-up to Koepka last year and was fourth the year before.

He missed an eight-foot putt at the last at Shinnecock Hills in 2018 that would have seen him record the first 62 in US Open history and get into a play-off. Will the 28-year-old break his major duck this weekend?

Italian Molinari, who partnered Fleetwood so well in last year’s Ryder Cup victory, is continuing to enjoy a late blossoming in his career.

The 36-year-old followed last year’s Open Championship win with joint sixth at the US PGA.

He then went close at this year’s Masters before dunking balls in the water on the 12th and 15th holes during the final round.

It remains a surprise to many that Rose has only one major victory to his name – the 2013 US Open.

The 38-year-old has, of course, won the 2016 Olympic title since then, but further major success has continued to elude him.

He is still ranked fourth in the world though – the top English player – and cannot be ruled out.

Spaniard Rahm is yet to transfer his form on the regular PGA and European Tours – where he has six victories in the past couple of years – to the majors.

Which Rahm will turn up this week? The 24-year-old has been all-or-nothing in his last six majors, with three top 10s and three missed cuts.

The course

The seventh green at Pebble Beach

Pebble Beach is hosting the US Open for the sixth time. Jack Nicklaus, winner of a record 18 major titles, won the first in 1972, and was runner-up 10 years later after Tom Watson holed a chip from deep rough on the par-three 17th on his way to a two-shot victory.

Watson’s caddie had told him to knock it close but the American famously said: “Close? Hell, I’m going to sink it.” Nicklaus later called it “one of the great shots in the history of the game”.

The exact point from which Watson chipped in no longer exists because part of the 17th green and 18th tee was claimed by the sea during a huge storm later that year.

Tom Kite took the 1992 title at the age of 42, while Woods dominated in 2000.

The United States Golf Association brought forward by two years its visit to Pebble because it wanted a spectacular course to bring in the millennium.

Woods ripped up the course, setting numerous records as he led from start to finish. He was the only player to beat par and his winning score of 12 under was the lowest in the then 106-year history.

His 15-shot margin of victory was a record and it was the start of the ‘Tiger Slam’, with Woods going on to win The Open and US PGA in 2000 before adding the 2001 Masters title.

Northern Ireland’s McDowell famously celebrated with his dad on the 18th green after winning in 2010 there – the US Open always finishes on Father’s Day.

McDowell shot a three-over 74 in the final round but still overcame a three-shot deficit as leader Dustin Johnson had a triple bogey on the second and dropped two more on the next to fall away.

There are numerous iconic holes on the course. Perhaps the most notable are the par-three seventh and 17th holes which play out towards the Pacific Ocean, while the closing par-five 18th hugs the coastline.

Round one (all times BST)

American unless stated.

Starting on the first hole

14:45 – Sam Saunders, Carlos Ortiz (Mex), Marcus Fraser (Aus)

14:56 – Scott Piercy, Erik Van Rooyen (SA), Chun An Yu (a) (Tpe)

15:07 – Ryan Fox (NZ), Thorbjorn Olesen (Den), Emiliano Grillo (Arg)

15:18 – Scottie Scheffler, Matt Parziale (a), Nick Taylor (Can)

15:29 – Patton Kizzire, Jovan Rebula (a) (SA), Jason Dufner

15:40 – Li Haotong (Chn), Bubba Watson, JB Holmes

15:51 – Zach Johnson, Martin Kaymer (Ger), Ernie Els (SA)

16:02 – Kim Si-woo (Kor), Rickie Fowler, Jason Day (Aus)

16:13 – Shane Lowry (Ire), Tyrrell Hatton (Eng), Gary Woodland

16:24 – Cameron Smith (Aus), Matthew Wallace (Eng), Xander Schauffele

16:35 – CT Pan (Tpe), Abraham Ancer (Mex), Brandon Wu (a)

16:46 – Chan Kim, Justin Walters (SA), Harris English

16:57 – Nick Hardy, Noah Norton (a), Andreas Halvorsen (Nor)

20:30 – Rory Sabbatini (Svk) Sam Horsfield (Eng) Roberto Castro

20:41 – Cameron Young (a), Marcus Kinhult (Swe), Brian Stuard

20:52 – Luke Guthrie, Joseph Bramlett, Charlie Danielson

21:03 – Austin Eckroat (a), Alexander Noren (Swe), Charles Howell

21:14 – Thomas Pieters (Bel), Chesson Hadley, Stewart Hagestad (a)

21:25 – Paul Casey (Eng), Patrick Cantlay, Lucas Glover

21:36 – Kiradech Aphibarnrat (Tha), Keith Mitchell, Shugo Imahira (Jpn)

21:47 – Francesco Molinari (Ita), Viktor Hovland (a) (Nor), Brooks Koepka

21:58 – Tony Finau, Jimmy Walker, Ian Poulter (Eng)

22:09 – Jordan Spieth, Justin Rose (Eng), Tiger Woods

22:20 – Daniel Berger, Matthew Jones (Aus), Kodai Ichihara (Jpn)

22:31 – Matthieu Pavon (Fra), Chandler Eaton (a), Callum Tarren (Eng)

22:42 – Eric Dietrich, Guillermo Pereira (Chn), Brett Drewitt (Aus)

Starting on the 10th hole

14:45 – Luis Gagne (a), Sepp Straka, Julian Etulain (Arg)

14:56 – Dean Burmester (SA), Bernd Wiesberger (Aut), Lee Kyoung-hoon (Kor)

15:07 – Clement Sordet (Fra), Tom Hoge, Adri Arnaus (Spa)

15:18 – Brian Davis (Eng), Kevin O’Connell (a), Billy Hurley III

15:29 – Brendon Todd, Luke Donald (Eng), Mike Weir (Can)

15:40 – Kyle Stanley, Billy Horschel, Danny Willett (Eng)

15:51 – Jon Rahm (Spa), Marc Leishman (Aus), Rory McIlroy (NI)

16:02 – Justin Thomas, Kevin Kisner, Bryson DeChambeau

16:13 – Dustin Johnson, Phil Mickelson, Graeme McDowell (NI)

16:24 – Hideki Matsuyama (Jpn), Sergio Garcia (Spa), Tommy Fleetwood (Eng)

16:35 – Jhonattan Vegas (Ven), Patrick Reed, Louis Oosthuizen (SA)

16:46 – Rob Oppenheim, Rhys Enoch (Wal), Richard Lee

16:57 – Andy Pope, Ryan Sullivan, Matthew Naumec

20:30 – Nathan Lashley, Renato Paratore (Ita), Lee Slattery (Eng)

20:41 – Joel Dahmen, Collin Morikawa, Aaron Wise

20:52 – Merrick Bremner (SA), Chip McDaniel, Cody Gribble

21:03 – Michael Thorbjornsen (a), Chez Reavie, David Toms

21:14 – Rafa Cabrera Bello (Spa), Kevin Na, Keegan Bradley

21:25 – Jim Furyk, Henrik Stenson (Swe), Brandt Snedeker

21:47 – Webb Simpson, Adam Scott (Aus), Matt Kuchar

21:58 – An Byeong-hun (Kor), Devon Bling (a), Matthew Fitzpatrick (Eng)

22:09 – Justin Harding (SA), Aaron Baddeley (Aus), Andrew Putnam

22:20 – Ollie Schniederjans, Mikumu Horikawa (Jpn), Anirban Lahiri (Ind)

22:31 – Daniel Hillier (a) (NZ), Alex Prugh, Zac Blair

22:42 – Hayden Shieh, Spencer Tibbits (a), Connor Arendell

Round two

Starting on the first hole

14:45 – Nathan Lashley, Renato Paratore (Ita), Lee Slattery (Eng)

14:56 – Joel Dahmen, Collin Morikawa, Aaron Wise

15:07 – Merrick Bremner (SA), Chip McDaniel, Cody Gribble

15:18 – Michael Thorbjornsen (a), Chez Reavie, David Toms

15:29 – Rafa Cabrera Bello (Spa), Kevin Na, Keegan Bradley

15:40 – Jim Furyk, Henrik Stenson (Swe), Brandt Snedeker

15:51 – Luke List, Lucas Bjerregaard (Den), Branden Grace (SA)

16:02 – Webb Simpson, Adam Scott (Aus), Matt Kuchar

16:13 – An Byeong-hun (Kor), Devon Bling (a), Matthew Fitzpatrick (Eng)

16:24 – Justin Harding (SA), Aaron Baddeley (Aus), Andrew Putnam

16:35 – Ollie Schniederjans, Mikumu Horikawa (Jpn), Anirban Lahiri (Ind)

16:46 – Daniel Hillier (a) (NZ), Alex Prugh, Zac Blair

16:57 – Hayden Shieh, Spencer Tibbits (a), Connor Arendell

20:30 – Luis Gagne (a), Sepp Straka, Julian Etulain (Arg)

20:41 – Dean Burmester (SA), Bernd Wiesberger (Aut), Lee Kyoung-hoon (Kor)

20:52 – Clement Sordet (Fra), Tom Hoge, Adri Arnaus (Spa)

21:03 – Brian Davis (Eng), Kevin O’Connell (a), Billy Hurley III

21:14 – Brendon Todd, Luke Donald (Eng), Mike Weir (Can)

21:25 – Kyle Stanley, Billy Horschel, Danny Willett (Eng)

21:36 – Jon Rahm (Spa), Marc Leishman (Aus), Rory McIlroy (NI)

21:47 – Justin Thomas, Kevin Kisner, Bryson DeChambeau

21:58 – Dustin Johnson, Phil Mickelson, Graeme McDowell (NI)

22:09 – Hideki Matsuyama (Jpn), Sergio Garcia (Spa), Tommy Fleetwood (Eng)

22:20 – Jhonattan Vegas (Ven), Patrick Reed, Louis Oosthuizen (SA)

22:31 – Rob Oppenheim, Rhys Enoch (Wal), Richard Lee

22:42 – Andy Pope, Ryan Sullivan, Matthew Naumec

Starting on the 10th hole

14:45 – Rory Sabbatini (Svk), Sam Horsfield (Eng), Roberto Castro

14:56 – Cameron Young (a), Marcus Kinhult (Swe), Brian Stuard

15:07 – Luke Guthrie, Joseph Bramlett, Charlie Danielson

15:18 – Austin Eckroat (a), Alexander Noren (Swe), Charles Howell

15:29 – Thomas Pieters (Bel), Chesson Hadley, Stewart Hagestad (a)

15:40 – Paul Casey (Eng), Patrick Cantlay, Lucas Glover

15:51 – Kiradech Aphibarnrat (Tha), Keith Mitchell, Shugo Imahira (Jpn)

16:02 – Francesco Molinari (Ita), Viktor Hovland (a) (Nor), Brooks Koepka

16:13 – Tony Finau, Jimmy Walker, Ian Poulter (Eng)

16:24 – Jordan Spieth, Justin Rose (Eng), Tiger Woods

16:35 – Daniel Berger, Matthew Jones (Aus), Kodai Ichihara (Jpn)

16:46 – Matthieu Pavon (Fra), Chandler Eaton (a), Callum Tarren (Eng)

16:57 – Eric Dietrich, Guillermo Pereira (Chi), Brett Drewitt (Aus)

20:30 – Sam Saunders, Carlos Ortiz (Mex), Marcus Fraser (Aus)

20:41 – Scott Piercy, Erik Van Rooyen (SA), Yu Chun-An (a) (Tpe)

20:52 – Ryan Fox (NZ), Thorbjorn Olesen (Den), Emiliano Grillo (Arg)

21:03 – Scottie Scheffler, Matt Parziale (a), Nick Taylor (Can)

21:14 – Patton Kizzire, Jovan Rebula (a) (SA), Jason Dufner

21:25 – Li Haotong (Chn), Bubba Watson, JB Holmes

21:36 – Zach Johnson, Martin Kaymer (Ger), Ernie Els (SA)

21:47 – Kim Si-woo (Kor), Rickie Fowler, Jason Day (Aus)

21:58 – Shane Lowry (Ire), Tyrrell Hatton (Eng), Gary Woodland

22:09 – Cameron Smith (Aus), Matthew Wallace (Eng), Xander Schauffele

22:20 – CT Pan (Tpe), Abraham Ancer (Mex), Brandon Wu (a)

22:31 – Chan Kim, Justin Walters (SA), Harris English

22:42 – Nick Hardy, Noah Norton (a), Andreas Halvorsen (Nor)

Go to Source

How do you fine tune a major winner? Meet the man preparing Koepka & Johnson for US Open

Dustin Johnson and Brooks Koepka

There will be big hitters and booming drives aplenty at Pebble Beach when the US Open begins on Thursday.

Professional golfers are now finely tuned athletes, stronger and fitter than their predecessors with many boasting the physical prowess to rival counterparts from traditionally more athletic sports.

Sitting top of the class are Brooks Koepka and Dustin Johnson, who finished first and second at last month’s US PGA Championship and are currently ranked as the best two golfers in the world.

So what is their secret?

Both work with Joey Diovisalvi, one of the pioneers in golf-specific fitness training and a biomechanics expert, who welcomes some of the top men’s and women’s players to his academy in Florida.

More than two decades ago, Diovisalvi recognised the need for players to evolve physically and set about putting the science behind the perfect swing into practice.

“It intrigued me because golfers were not so keen on the physical aspects – they were slow, late adapters and it took me a long time to create some acceptance and trust in that world,” Diovisalvi, who credits 15-time major champion Tiger Woods as an early influencer in the field, told BBC Sport.

“I look at golfers today like Dustin and Brooks – an Adam Scott, a Jason Day and a Rory McIlroy – players of this calibre, they’re very athletic, the human body has evolved, the science has evolved, the equipment has evolved.

“You look at them and the average player out on tour, their bodies have changed in height, weight, physicality… you see this huge shift in the game. Physicality can overpower a golf course.

“You have to be such an amazing player to be able to compete with the guys at the top of the game.”

Diovisalvi uses the example of England’s Tommy Fleetwood, who finished runner-up at the US Open last year and is ranked 18th in the world despite his relatively smaller stature.

“I love Tommy and his trainer because he is like a Samson and Goliath,” he said. “I see the way Tommy trains. He’s in the gym so many times at the same time Brooks and I or Dustin and I.

“Tommy is relentless in his pursuit of his strength, conditioning, mobility, flexibility. He and his trainer do such a phenomenal job and Tommy has really been able to compete with the bigger guys, but if his game is off it’s very hard to put the ball in a position to score when they are out-driving you by 50/60 yards.”

Joey Diovisalvi

A day in the life of DJ…

Diovisalvi headed to the Canadian Open with world number two Johnson last week as the American put the final touches on his preparation for the third major of the year.

“Dustin is in a good place,” he said. “He’s hitting it well and he’s more comfortable with the putter. His body has been slowly and gradually building up to this major. He loves Pebble Beach, so I am very confident in the way he’s approaching this week and used Canada as an opportunity.

“Mentally it preps these guys to have enough reps to feel good about where their driver is, where their short game is, the approach shots – what does it look like with the irons?

“It’s a really good test to see how the body and the swing are working. Dustin’s body is peaking nicely.”

Helping players get their “feel” is a key part of Diovisalvi’s role.

“As the coach and the player are trying to get something to feel right, especially before a major, our job is to make sure the body and the nervous system understand how to ingrain that without over-thinking,” he added.

“When their feel is off, you see them do things that are out of character for the calibre they play at. You hear the commentators, they start to over analyse and that’s not really what it is… the reality is, if the feel is right and their bodies are reacting and they feel good with where their mental game is, it’s a pretty seamless effort.

“Then it comes down to can they putt well to score?”

But life on the PGA Tour can be intense, with players enduring long, hectic days that run far beyond what is picked up by the cameras during their rounds.

“It’s not just a sunshiny day and they show up on the tee box or the driving range and go and play a five-hour round in the sunny weather,” explained Diovisalvi, who has previously worked with three-time major winner Vijay Singh.

“Both Brooks and Dustin take their nutrition very seriously, they had chefs with them this week and rented homes so they got more of a feel what it’s like to have their support team around them, their family, the opportunity to sleep better, to eat better.”

A day in the life on tour, eg 07:00 tee time
04:00: Wake Up
04:40: Eat breakfast
05:00: Arrive at golf course-10 mins on stationary bike-10 mins full dynamic stretch-15 mins stability/mobility/functional exercises
05:45-06:55: Practice range
07:00-12:00: Play round
12:00-14:00: Interviews, lunch, practice (if necessary), rest
16:00-17:30: Full 90-minute gym workout

After an early wake up – 04:00 if on the first tee at 07:00 – the players warm-up in the fitness trailers provided by the PGA Tour that are kitted out with the latest technology.

“Dustin will get on a spin bike for 10 or 12 minutes, get blood flowing, get his heart rate going a little bit,” added Diovisalvi. “Then we get down on a mat and do a very active, dynamic stretch for another 10 minutes.”

Next, the 2016 US Open champion works through a number of drills using stability balls, dumbbells, resistance bands and medicine balls to engage the muscles used during his round.

“He’s using very dynamic movement patterns that mimic the golf swing,” said Diovisalvi. “He’s very prepared in about 30 minutes to go out to the driving range and begin his routine.

“Now his feel or his body is very switched on. The nerves are firing, he feels the pressure from his feet.

“In 2019 we have worked harder than ever before on ‘prehabilitation’ – getting the body ready to perform so there’s few chances of injury, higher performance levels, more ability to get the body to move properly.”

Diovisalvi takes huge pride in seeing the players he and his team have worked with win tournaments and the academy in Jupiter, Florida is decorated with banners won by the likes of Johnson, Koepka, Justin Thomas, Lexi Thompson and Michelle Wie.

“They always say the proof is in the championship rings, or the banners that hang on our walls,” he said. “The majors that have been won in our team, they humble me every day.

“You hang these banners and think ‘gosh, we’ve been on teams that have helped win so many majors’, it really is humbling what you have participated in and how you helped grow the game.”

Go to Source

Woods hoping for 10 more years contending for majors

Tiger Woods

US Open
Date: 13-16 June Venue: Pebble Beach, California
Coverage: Live text commentary on BBC Sport website and commentary on BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra

Fifteen-time major champion Tiger Woods says he hopes he has another “10 years” to win majors ahead of the US Open in California.

The 43-year-old ended an 11-year wait to claim a 15th major at the Masters in Augusta in April.

“Hypothetically if I give myself another 10 years that’s 40 majors,” Woods said on Tuesday.

“The trick is can I keep myself healthy and strong enough considering what my body has been through?

“That’s where I need help with all my trainers and physios and workout regimes, and hopefully I can make that happen.”

Woods missed the cut at the US PGA Championship in May and finished ninth at the Memorial Tournament earlier this month but returns to Pebble Beach where he won the 2000 US Open by 15 shots.

The American, who had spinal fusion surgery in 2017 and has had four back surgeries in his career, still has Jack Nicklaus’s record haul of 18 majors in his sights.

“This week I feel like I’m trending in the right direction. I need one more day of prep. I want to see the golf course when it’s a little bit closer to game time.”

Brooks Koepka is seeking a third consecutive US Open title, following his victories at Erin Hills in 2017 and Shinnecock Hills 12 months ago.

Koepka will attempt to become only the second player after Scotland’s Willie Anderson (1903-05) to win the tournament three years in succession.

“It would be the coolest thing ever to win three in a row with the third one at Pebble,” the world number one said.

“As a kid you always wanted to win a US Open at Pebble. You look at the guys that have won here and they are some of the greatest players to have played the game.”

Brooks Koepka

Jordan Spieth, who will seek at fourth major title and first since he claimed the 2017 British Open, said his putting stroke and swing have improved at the right time.

“But there’s one thing of knowing how to do it. There’s another of practising it and then trusting it on the golf course in tournament play,” Spieth said on Tuesday.

“And the last four weeks were big for me to have – be able to trust it in tournament play, have those reps under pressure, see where I’m actually at and see what I need to improve on.”

Spieth will play the opening two rounds this week alongside fellow American Woods and Englishman Justin Rose.

Northern Ireland’s Graeme McDowell will partner Dustin Johnson and Phil Mickelson in the first two rounds and comes into the event having qualified for the Open in his home town of Portrush on Sunday.

“Four or five months ago if you told me I’d be playing the first two rounds here with Dustin and Phil, with the way my game was, I would have been intimidated,” the 3 said.

“But with the victory (in the Dominican Republic in March) and some good finishes, the confidence is coming back and I feel very good about my game.

“It goes without saying I won once around here, I obviously feel like my game suits this golf course.”

Go to Source