British Cycling’s former chair Jonathan Browning also steps down as non-executive director

After stepping down from his role as British Cycling chair in December, Jonathan Browning will also leave his position as non-executive director in March

Less than three months after stepping down as chair of British Cycling, Jonathan Browning has announced that he will also step down from his role as non-executive director at the organisation at the end of March.

Browning’s term as non-executive director was due to expire in March, and he has elected not to stay on, saying that the “time is right” for him to step away from British Cycling.

Browning took the job of BC interim chair in February 2017 as the national body was embroiled in controversy surrounding allegations of sexism and bullying. He stayed on until December 7 2017 as chair, and was replaced by Frank Slevin.

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“After three years as a volunteer on the British Cycling Board as an independent non-executive director and chair, the time is now right for me to step away to devote more time to other interests and commitments, and indeed to give the new chair the space to develop his own board,” said Browning in a statement.

“When I was asked to assume the role of chair, British Cycling was in the depths of a crisis which required a rapid and wholesale transformation. British Cycling has significantly moved on from the people, behaviours and structures that led to the failures for which the organisation has been publicly held to account. It is essential that the new team maintains the pace of change and completes the transformation.”

Browning continued: “I am pleased that I am able to leave British Cycling in a much stronger position than a year ago, with new structures and processes implemented, a new CEO, a new performance director, a new independent chair, and with the major foundations in place for a successful future.”



Slevin thanked Browning for his time at British Cycling, and for steering it through a difficult time.

“British Cycling was in a crisis when Jonathan was appointed chair,” said Slevin. “There was a tremendous amount of work to do to ensure that we learned from past mistakes, and took British Cycling forward in the right way.”

Browning’s departure is the latest change in the upper echelons of British Cycling management over the past year. In addition to the change in chair in February 2017, Julie Harrington started as BC chief executive in May 2017 and Stephen Park took up the role of performance director last spring.

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