TritonWear Analysis: Men’s 400 Free at FINA World Championships

TritonWear and Swimming World partner to bring you the best in swimming race analysis for the 2017 Fina World Championships. With the power of TritonWear, you can access 12+ metrics for all athletes simultaneously, display the results in real-time to unlimited screens on deck, and review later in an easy to use interface for monitoring progress and identifying trends over time.

The first day of any international championship is always exciting, especially when the first finals event is an anticipated showdown between rivals Sun Yang and Mack Horton. It became even more interesting with a twist from Felix Auboeck of Austria, surprising everyone in prelims as he secured the top seed position going into finals. Everyone was curious, wondering where he had come from, considering his less than top 20 finish in Rio just over a year prior, and his entry rank for this event not in the top 8 at all.

All eyes were on this race heading into finals this evening; would Auboeck hold the lead against his experienced competitors, would Sun relinquish his title allowing someone new to come out on top, and how will Horton perform, being seeded 5th going into the race.

In this first 50, Horton and Gabriele Detti had the same split time, speed, and walls, however Detti took 4 extra strokes, costing valuable energy in this first length. Park Tae Hwan had a great start, finishing first first at the 50m mark, with the third highest stroke index, he is poised for a successful race. Sun swam the technically most efficient first length, but his underwater time was the shortest, causing him to finish 2 100ths of a second behind Park. After the first 50 it seems Auboeck and Detti could benefit from stroke efficiency, while Sun could lengthen his break out.

At the 100m mark, Park is still in first, but Sun is very close behind. Horton is maintaining a lower stroke count than the rest, with the highest efficiency. If he could speed up his stroke count even slightly, while maintaining his stroke rate, he would be well positioned to lead this race. Detti has fallen behind, tied with Auboeck, he is taking the most strokes, but has the slowest speed. If he could increase his DPS and maintain the stroke count, it would be a very different race for him.

As we hit the 150m mark, Sun has taken the lead, with Park still very close on his heels. Both are swimming very similar races, with short underwaters and identical DPS. If Park can just slip one extra stroke in, without losing speed, he’d pull ahead at this point. Detti is showing signs of fatigue; his stroke count continues to rise, while his DPS and speed fall. He should work on lengthening his stroke to conserve his energy for the latter part of the race. Auboeck got through this length losing minimally on all metrics, if he is able to maintain this level of consistently through the balance he’ll could be ok, but if he continues to lose pace at this rate, he may be in trouble.

With half the race behind them, Sun continues to dominate on all fronts. Horton and Park swam basically identical lengths again here, but Park has the lower stroke rate, allowing him to come in slightly faster than Horton. Dettie and Auboeck are again tied for 4th place, and basically matching each other on stroke count, speed and walls. Auboeck is getting considerably more distance per stroke, which is allowing him to maintain pace with the pack.

After 250m, the gap widens between Sun and the rest of the field, even in the face of Horton showing a stronger length in terms of efficiency. Park is starting to lose pace at this point, his endurance not able to maintain through the duration of this race. He is still ahead of Detti here, but is slowing much faster previous lengths. Both Detti and Auboeck had better splits than the previous couple lengths. It is certainly interesting timing for a burst of energy, let’s see if they can maintain the faster pace for the last 150m of this race.

With 100m left to go, Sun is still out in front, but Detti actually registers the fastest split this length. While technically he is still the least efficient, his high stroke count is working in his favour, similar to ledecky’s style of racing. Auboeck is unable to maintain the burst of speed he showed in the last 50m, slightly losing ground on the field at this point again. Horton has remained very consistent throughout the entire race, his stroke count only climbing by 2 strokes in the first 2 lengths consecutively, then remaining while all other competitors rates rose. At this point showing the technically most efficient stroke, saving himself valuable energy for the last 100m.

Sun is reducing his reach per stroke, but is gaining speed as he rounds the corner toward the end of this race. He is pulling from the reserves of an efficient stroke to distance himself from the rest of the field as the race nears the end. Detti too is pulling from reserves, which didn’t appear to exist a few lengths ago. He is proving his endurance is stronger than it seem earlier in this race. Park and Auboeck continue to slow at the 350m mark, at this point Park is swimming the slowest split, offering room for Auboeck to potentially pull into 4th place. If he could lengthen his breakouts he wouldn’t lose as much speed each race.

In this final lap, Park comes in the strongest, showing his experience in the race, and pulling well ahead of Auboeck, who performed quite well through the entire race. Suns final lap is the second fastest of the race, with a much less efficient stroke. He has cleared conditioned himself for this type of race. Horton’s steady pace throughout has proven a good strategy for him, allowing him to finish 2nd. If he can increase his stroke count while maintaining the other metric, he will come much closer to Sun, who finished a solid 2.5 seconds ahead of the crowd.
similar to Sun, Detti swims his second faster length in this last 50m. His best shot at the gold would be to improve his speed through those middle lengths, likely while maintaining the high stroke count – this strategy seems to work for him.

All competitors swam relatively similar races, with Detti showing the biggest different with a much higher stroke rate than the rest. Sun and Park spend the least time underwater, which isn’t much of an issue for them, as they both have significant reserves to pull in their times come the end of the race. Auboeck swam a race similar to Detti’s high stroke rate, although not as high as Detti, his stroke was technically inefficient. Pair this with lower endurance, due to lack of experience, and it’s clear how he went from a 1st place seed to 5th against these experienced veterans of the championship circuit.

Overall, a very successful race, proving once again that strategy has to be very personal, and can be quite different through each portion of a race of this length.

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Laszlo Cseh, Gabriele Detti Among Top Seeds in Day 3 Prelims Heat Sheets

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Heat sheets are now available for day three prelims of the 2017 FINA World Championships. On the schedule for the start of day three is the men’s 50 breast, women’s 200 free, men’s 200 fly and men’s 800 free.

PRELIMS HEAT SHEETS

The shortest race of the morning will feature the defending World Champion Adam Peaty. Peaty will be swimming fresh off his gold-medal winning 100 breast, where he neared his world record. Young Italian breaststroke sensation, Nicolo’ Martinenghi, will be present in prelims, while fellow breaststroke aces Kevin Cordes, Joao Gomes Junior, and Cameron van der Burgh also enter with quick times.

Defending Olympic Gold Medallist and World Champion Katie Ledecky enters as the top seed in the women’s 200 free with a 1:53.73. World Record holder Federica Pellegrini holds the second fastest seed with a 1:54.55.

Fellow 2016 silver medallists Laszlo Cseh and Chad le Clos will begin their quest towards butterfly gold as two of the fastest seeds in the 200 fly heats. Japan’s Masato Sakai and Hungary’s Tamas Kenderesi are also top seeds.

The morning session will end with the preliminary heats of the men’s 1500 free as Italy’s Gabriele Detti hosts the fastest seed time at a 7:41.64. Fellow Italian Gregorio Paltrinieri holds the second fastest seed time at a 7:442.33.

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Katinka Hosszu’s Home Win Highlights Second Night of Finals at World Championships in Budapest

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The second night of action from the pool at Budapest at the 2017 FINA World Championships featured lots of exciting action. Hungarian Katinka Hosszu delivered a gold medal for the home crowd with her third straight 200 IM World Title. Adam Peaty and Sarah Sjostrom just missed their World Records in their respective events but they defended their 2015 World Titles in the process. Great Britain picked up another gold on the night with Ben Proud in the 50 fly.

Americans picked up medals from Kevin Cordes (silver) in the 100 breast, Kelsi Worrell (bronze) in the 100 fly and Madisyn Cox (bronze) in the 200 IM.

Men’s 100 Breast

It wasn’t a world record, but Brit Adam Peaty repeated his World Championship gold from 2015 on Monday night in Budapest at the FINA World Championships. Peaty won the race with a 57.47 and a championship record. Peaty was just shy of his 57.13 world record from last year.

Kevin Cordes picked up a silver in the race with a 58.79 and Russian Kirill Prigoda was third at 59.05. Prigoda’s time was a Russian national record.

Japan’s Yasuhiro Koseki (59.10), USA’s Cody Miller (59.11), Lithuania’s Andrius Sidlauskas (59.21), China’s Yan Zibei (59.42) and Britain’s Ross Murdoch (59.45) also swam in the championship final.

Peaty’s win is the third gold medal for Britain in the 100 breast at the World Championships. He joins himself (2015) and David Wilkie (1975) as World Championship winners in this event.

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Women’s 100 Fly

Similar to Adam Peaty in the 100 breast, Sarah Sjostrom was not expected to lose in the women’s 100 fly final, as she was chasing her world record from Rio last summer. Sjostrom just missed the record as she went 55.53 to break the championship record, but missed her best time of 55.48.

She got some pressure from either side of her as Australian Emma McKeon (56.18) and American Kelsi Worrell (56.37) pushed her the whole race. The time for McKeon is an Australian record to move past 2008 Olympic champion Libby Trickett.

Canada’s Penny Oleksiak (56.94), South Korea’s An Sehyeon (57.07), Japan’s Rikako Ikee (57.08), Russia’s Svetlana Chimrova (57.24) and China’s Zhang Yufei (57.51) also competed in the championship final.

This is Sjostrom’s fourth overall World Championship gold medal as she previously won in 2009, 2013 and 2015.

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Men’s 100 Back (SF)

Chinese swimmer Xu Jiayu cruised over the last 25 in his semi-final heat to grab the number one seed for the 100 back tomorrow night with a 52.44. Xu was out under world record pace and let up over the last few meters in his swim. He leads Americans Ryan Murphy (52.95) and Matt Grevers (52.97) into Tuesday’s final.

Japan’s Ryosuke Irie (53.02), Russia’s Grigory Tarasevich (53.06), Australia’s Mitchell Larkin (53.19), Brazil’s Guilherme Guido (53.71) and New Zealand’s Corey Main (53.76) will also swim in the A-final tomorrow.

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There was a tie for ninth place so a swim-off was in order for first alternate. Russian Kliment Kolesnikov broke the world junior record with a 53.38 in the 100 back swim-off. Kolesnikov lowered his own world junior record that was a 53.65 from July 2016.

Kolesnikov beat China’s Li Guangyuan who was a 53.70. The two tied for ninth at 53.84. Kolesnikov won’t swim in tomorrow’s final but his 53.38 would have been seventh in the semi-finals. Kolesnikov is just 17 years old so he has another year to lower his world junior record.

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Women’s 100 Breast (SF)

In what will be must-see television, Russia’s Yulia Efimova will be the top seed in the 100 breast at the FINA World Championships in Budapest in tomorrow’s final. Efimova got oh-so-close to Ruta Meilutyte’s world record of 1:04.35 with a 1:04.36. Efimova leads Olympic champion Lilly King, who was second at 1:04.53. The two will clash heads in a much anticipated rematch after last summer’s epic duel in Rio.

Don’t take your eyes off of world record holder Meilutyte who is third at 1:05.06. Meilutyte will not want to see her world record go down and she will be looking to do better than her disappointing swim in Rio last summer.

American Katie Meili (1:05.48), China’s Shi Jinglin (1:06.47), Spain’s Jessica Vall (1:06.62), Canada’s Kierra Smith (1:06.62) and Great Britain’s Sarah Vasey (1:06.81) will compete in tomorrow’s final.

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Men’s 50 Fly

Great Britain got its second gold of the night with Ben Proud in the 50 butterfly A-final. Proud went 22.75 to win the gold medal in the 50 fly to just miss the championship record of 22.67 from Milorad Cavic set in 2009. Proud wins his first individual medal at either the Olympics or World Championships.

Brazil’s Nicholas Santos (22.79) and Ukraine’s Andrii Govorov (22.84) also picked up individual medals in the race. Those three out-swam American Caeleb Dressel (22.89) and Singapore’s Joseph Schooling (22.95) who placed fourth and fifth.

Brazil’s Henrique Martins (23.14), Ukraine’s Andrii Khloptsov (23.31) and American Tim Phillips (23.38) also swam in the A-final.

Proud’s swim is the first time anyone from Great Britain has medaled in the event since 2001 when Mark Foster was third.

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Women’s 100 Back (SF)

It seems to be the theme of the night. World records keep getting rattled but not broken. Kylie Masse got oh-so-close to the 100 back record with a 58.18. She just missed Gemma Spofforth’s record of 58.12 from 2009. Masse broke her Canadian record from earlier this year that was a 58.21.

Masse leads a quality final that includes the defending world champion Emily Seebohm of Australia. Seebohm (58.85), American Kathleen Baker (59.03), American Olivia Smoliga (59.07), Russian Anastasia Fesikova (59.26), Czech Simona Baumrtova (59.65), Russian Daria Ustinova (59.74) and Kathleen Dawson (59.82) will also swim in the A-final tomorrow.

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Men’s 200 Free (SF)

The British swimmers keep churning out great swims on night two of the World Championships. James Guy and Duncan Scott lead a very fast 200 free field into tomorrow with Scott leading the way at 1:45.16. Guy was second at 1:45.18. The two Brits lead reigning Olympic champ Sun Yang of China (1:45.24) and Townley Haas of the US (1:45.43).

It is a very fast 200 free final as eighth place was 1:46.28, with seven of the finalists turning in 1:45’s in the semi’s. Russians Aleksandr Krasnykh (1:45.47) and Mikhail Dovgalyuk (1:45.74) will join Hungarian Dominik Kozma (1:45.87) and Korean Park Tae Hwan (1:46.28) in the final tomorrow.

Guy will be looking to defend his world title from 2015 as Sun will be looking to back up his Olympic gold from last summer, as well as win his second gold of the meet after winning the 400 on Sunday night.

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Women’s 200 IM

In front of a rowdy Hungarian crowd, Katinka Hosszu delivered a dominating performance in the 200 IM for her third straight world title in the event. Hosszu gave her home fans something to cheer about as she went 2:07.00 to win the world title ahead of Japan’s Yui Ohashi (2:07.91). Hosszu led from start to finish in the race ahead of Ohashi.

American Madisyn Cox had a late charge over the second half to snag the bronze medal with a 2:09.71. Cox stated in her NBC interview after the race that she channeled the Hungarian cheers for herself and pretended they were cheering for her, spurring her onto the bronze medal.

American Melanie Margalis (2:09.82), Japan’s Runa Imai (2:09.99), South Korea’s Kim Seoyeong (2:10.40) and Great Britain’s Siobhan O’Connor (2:10.41) also competed in the A-final.

The big question in the race was Canadian Sydney Pickrem, who was a medal favorite, getting out of the pool after the 50. Swimming World will update if we find more information.

This is Hosszu’s third straight World Title in the 200 IM and her fourth medal in the event in the World Championships. Her 2017 win adds on to her wins in 2013 and 2015 as well as her bronze in 2009.

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The Week That Was: Records Fall As Swim Competition At Worlds Begins

Photo Courtesy: Erich Schlegel-USA TODAY Sports

The beginning of the pool competition at the FINA World Championships has had no shortage of excitement, with several national and championship records falling on the first night of finals, including a world record! Catch up on all the action from that competition and the news of the week in the week that was.

The Week That Was #5 – Dartmouth Women’s Team Placed On Probation

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Photo Courtesy: Dartmouth Athletics

The Dartmouth women’s swimming and diving team is receiving a one-year probation after violating the college’s hazing policy. The sanctions against the team will include cancelling three meets in the fall prior to December 1st and prohibiting the team from taking a training trip during winter break. The team’s violation did not involve alcohol or illegal drug use nor did it cause physical harm to any members of the team. The team will begin practice as normal in the fall and resume their normal competition schedule in December. You can read the full statement from Dartmouth Athletics here.

The Week That Was #4 – Adam Wright Takes Over Women’s UCLA Water Polo

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The UCLA Athletic Department announced this week that Adam Wright will be taking over the coaching responsibilities for the Bruins women’s water polo team. Wright is the current head coach of the Bruins men’s water polo team in addition to being a UCLA alum himself. He will be stepping into the role that Brandon Brooks vacated last month, resigning after eight years as the head coach of the women’s team. That makes Brooks one of the few coaches at the Division I level who has a head coaching role with both the men’s and women’s varsity teams. Wright has had considerable success with the men’s team at UCLA that has included back to back NCAA titles in 2014 and 2015. You can read the full statement on Wright’s appointment from UCLA here.

The Week That Was #3 – France Dominant As Open Water Competition Comes To A Close

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Photo Courtesy: Swimming Australia Ltd.

France continued their impressive showing the open water competition at the 2017 FINA World Championships, taking two of the three open water races that closed the open water races this week. The team of Oceanne Maryse Jeannie Cassignol, Logan Fontaine, Marc-Antoine Olivier, and Aurelie Muller led France to a decisive win in the mixed relay event, while Axel Raymond was victorious in the men’s 25k event. That added to the world titles that Olivier and Muller had already won in the competition thus far. Team USA finished second in the relay event, while Brazil’s Ana Marcela Cunha won her third open water world title in the women’s 25k event. You can see all of the updates from the open water portion of the FINA World Championships here.

The Week That Was #2 – FINA Clarifies “Lochte Rule”

Ryan Lochte underwater

Photo Courtesy: FINA Doha 2014

FINA announced a series of technical rule changes for swimming this week that will affect international and masters swimming. The most notable rule change is related to the so-called “Lochte rule,” which stated that a swimmer could be on his or her back at no point while swimming freestyle during an IM or medley relay event. The rule has been adjusted to provide some wiggle room, changing the language so that the “swimmer must be on the breast except when executing a turn. The swimmer must return to the breast before any kick or stroke.” There has been a lot of attention over this rule for the last couple years, most recently after a series of DQ’s at the U.S. Nationals in the 400 IM that left would-be runner-up Ella Eastin off of the World Team. The rules will be effective this fall, which means the old interpretations will still be valid for the current World Championships. You can read a full list of the rule changes here.

The Week That Was #1 – World, National Records Fall On First Night of Swimming Finals

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Chinese gold medalist Sun Yang picked up the first gold medal of the meet, taking the top spot in the 400 free when he won in 3:41.38. Defending Olympic gold medalist Mack Horton was second in 3:43.38. Katie Ledecky repeated as the women’s 400 free champion in a new meet record of 3:58.34, with teammate Leah Smith finishing second to repeat their finish from last summer. But the most exciting races of the night had to be the 400 free relays. Caeleb Dressel led off the U.S. relay in a new American Record of 47.26 before powering to gold with Blake Pieroni, Townley Haas, and Nathan Adrian. Dressel’s teammate Mallory Comerford also led off in a new American Record, breaking teammate Simone Manuel’s mark of 52.70 with her own 52.59 and helping the team of Ledecky, Kelsi Worrell, and Manuel to gold and a new American Record of 3:31.72. But the performance of the day had to go to Swedish gold medalist Sarah Sjostrom, who led off the Swedish relay with a world record of 51.71, becoming the first woman under 52 seconds in history. You can stay up to date with all the action from the 2017 FINA World Championships on our Event Landing Page.

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Russian Kliment Kolesnikov Lowers His Own World Junior Record in 100 Back Swim-Off

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In the last event of the night in Budapest, Russian Kliment Kolesnikov broke the world junior record with a 53.38 in a swim-off for first alternate in the 100 back. Kolesnikov lowered his own world junior record that was a 53.65 from July 2016.

Kolesnikov beat China’s Li Guangyuan who was a 53.70. The two tied for ninth at 53.84. Kolesnikov won’t swim in tomorrow’s final but his 53.38 would have been seventh in the semi-finals. Kolesnikov is just 17 years old so he has another year to lower his world junior record.

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Kris Gethin: Man Of Iron, Week 12

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Kris also shares his recipe—of sorts—for the elixir of eternal life. This mottled green sludge contains turmeric, ginger, cinnamon, magnesium powder, glutamine, apple cider vinegar, lemon juice, omega-3 oil, and the fermented dairy product kefir. Bottoms up! Just remember to shake it well and hold your nose.

Fans of Kris’ DTP or Dramatic Transformation Principle style of training take note: This week’s strength training is all DTP! Download the workouts to follow them yourself—after watching Kris and Craig Capurso train DTP legs, of course.

Training and Nutrition Tips

  • Kris will be the first to admit that open-water swimming and pool swimming are two entirely different animals. If you want to do a tri, practicing open-water swimming is a must!
  • After his first successful lap in murky Quinn’s Pond, Kris allows himself momentary congratulations, but nothing more. “One lap is better than nothing. Then get back out there,” his coach tells him.
  • Distance running, biking, swimming—they’re all quite tranquil once you find your rhythm. Or at least they can be. Try to find peace where you can.
  • When doing interval work—which is an essential part of your conditioning here—build up to max intensity. Don’t leap in on the first set, or you’ll run out of gas. But by the third or fourth set, you should be raging.
  • Kris has to step outside of his comfort zone this week. He runs in the evening—which he hates—and swaps the times of a bike and a run to fit them around his busy schedule. The lesson for you: Do what you’ve got to do. But do the work, too.

Back | Main | Week 13 Coming July 31

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Katinka Hosszu Pleases Hungarian Crowd With Third Straight 200 IM World Title; Madisyn Cox Surprises For Bronze

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In front of a rowdy Hungarian crowd, Katinka Hosszu delivered a dominating performance in the 200 IM for her third straight world title in the event. Hosszu gave her home fans something to cheer about as she went 2:07.00 to win the world title ahead of Japan’s Yui Ohashi (2:07.91). Hosszu led from start to finish in the race ahead of Ohashi.

American Madisyn Cox had a late charge over the second half to snag the bronze medal with a 2:09.71. Cox stated in her NBC interview after the race that she channeled the Hungarian cheers for herself and pretended they were cheering for her, spurring her onto the bronze medal.

American Melanie Margalis (2:09.82), Japan’s Runa Imai (2:09.99), South Korea’s Kim Seoyeong (2:10.40) and Great Britain’s Siobhan O’Connor (2:10.41) also competed in the A-final.

The big question in the race was Canadian Sydney Pickrem, who was a medal favorite, getting out of the pool after the 50. Swimming World will update if we find more information.

This is Hosszu’s third straight World Title in the 200 IM and her fourth medal in the event in the World Championships. Her 2017 win adds on to her wins in 2013 and 2015 as well as her bronze in 2009.

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Brits Duncan Scott and James Guy Lead 200 Free Semis; Townley Haas in Fourth

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The British swimmers keep churning out great swims on night two of the World Championships. James Guy and Duncan Scott lead a very fast 200 free field into tomorrow with Scott leading the way at 1:45.16. Guy was second at 1:45.18. The two Brits lead reigning Olympic champ Sun Yang of China (1:45.24) and Townley Haas of the US (1:45.43).

It is a very fast 200 free final as eighth place was 1:46.28, with seven of the finalists turning in 1:45’s in the semi’s. Russians Aleksandr Krasnykh (1:45.47) and Mikhail Dovgalyuk (1:45.74) will join Hungarian Dominik Kozma (1:45.87) and Korean Park Tae Hwan (1:46.28) in the final tomorrow.

Guy will be looking to defend his world title from 2015 as Sun will be looking to back up his Olympic gold from last summer, as well as win his second gold of the meet after winning the 400 on Sunday night.

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Kylie Masse Just Misses 100 Back World Record in Semi-Finals; Kathleen Baker Third, Olivia Smoliga Fourth

It seems to be the theme of the night. World records keep getting rattled but not broken. Kylie Masse got oh-so-close to the 100 back record with a 58.18. She just missed Gemma Spofforth’s record of 58.12 from 2009. Masse broke her Canadian record from earlier this year that was a 58.21.

Masse leads a quality final that includes the defending world champion Emily Seebohm of Australia. Seebohm (58.85), American Kathleen Baker (59.03), American Olivia Smoliga (59.07), Russian Anastasia Fesikova (59.26), Czech Simona Baumrtova (59.65), Russian Daria Ustinova (59.74) and Kathleen Dawson (59.82) will also swim in the A-final tomorrow.

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Kirill Prigoda Lowers Own 100 Breast Russian National Record

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Kirill Prigoda succeeded in lowering his own Russian National Record in finals of the men’s 100 breast at day two of the 2017 FINA World Championships.

Prigoda powered to a bronze medal finish of 59.05, leaving his previous record of 59.24 in the dust. That record was set during semi-finals of the men’s 100 breast one day earlier.

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