How to Have Incredible Practices Every Day

Photo Courtesy: Becca Wyant

By Norah Hunt, Swimming World College Intern. 

Our sport, as complex and sometimes complicated as it is, can nevertheless be divided into two distinct, simple divisions: practice and competition.

While meets are where all the glory is gained, practice is where the work is put in, and where goals are actually attained. In a season, a typical swimmer will go to around five or six meets, but over 300 practices. Improvements are not made in the spotlight; they are made day after day, at a quiet pool where there is oftentimes only one or two people on the deck.

Every season, swimmers strive to make technical advancements each and every practice, with the hope that the hard work will pay off at the big meet. Is there a way make every practice great, and to benefit as much as possible from each one? Absolutely! Here’s how!

Jun 18, 2015; Santa Clara, CA, USA; Michael Phelps (USA) during the morning warm ups session on Day One of the Arena Pro Series at Santa Clara, at the George F. Haines International Swim Center in Santa Clara, Calif. Mandatory Credit: Bob Stanton-USA TODAY Sports

Photo Courtesy: Robert Stanton/USA Today Sports Images

Do not mentally prepare.

This first one might seem a little odd, especially since as athletes we are taught to always, always have some sort of mental preparation before a meet or a big race. However, practices are not special occurrences; they are part of a day to day routine that includes balancing work, school, a social life, and sleep; thinking about swimming more than we already have to is just silly!

Accept that the practice will be what it is, and go into each one with an open mindset. Sometimes the best way to prepare for something is not to prepare at all; try not to over think the simple things.

Stanford Swimming vs. Arizona

Photo Courtesy: Jeff Commings

Allow some time to zone out.

The best time to do this is usually during the first 200-400 of warm up. Regardless of whether the day was fantastic or horrible, it is a good idea to have a mental reset. Zone out, look at the black line at the bottom of the pool, pick a catchy song to sing in your head.

Whatever and however you do it, find a way to take a slight break from reality, and have a couple minutes of mindless thinking. After the five minutes is up, come back to reality and focus on the set before you.

Jun 21, 2014; Santa Clara, CA, USA; Start of heat two of the Women's 50M Freestyle during the preliminary heats at George F. Haines International Aquatic Center. Mandatory Credit: Bob Stanton-USA TODAY Sports

Photo Courtesy: Bob Stanton-USA TODAY Sports

Take each practice a set at a time.

It is so, so easy to become overwhelmed by the main set, especially if the coach has already written it on the board and it looks like a tough time. However, the other sets in the practice are just as important, and they are unfortunately often the most forgotten or rushed through.

That tough kick or underwater set before the main set is there for a reason, and in order to benefit fully from each practice it is wise to not mentally rush ahead to what is coming. Take everything in stride, and give each set your best effort.

arizona-cheering-

Photo Courtesy: Peter H. Bick

Cheer for your teammates.

This is probably the most important thing that can be done in a practice. Most bystanders think swimming is a solitary sport, but nothing could be further from the truth. During strenuous workouts, it is so crucial to maintain a positive attitude, and sometimes a set can be completely turned around by a teammate giving an encouraging or uplifting word. Cheer for your fellow swimmers, strive to make their set better, and you will find motivation for yourself as well.

stretching-world-championships-2015

Photo Courtesy: R-Sport / MIA Rossiya Segodnya

Take recovery seriously.  

Sometimes, after practice we barely have the energy to pull ourselves out of the pool; we are so exhausted. At these times, the only thing we truly want to do is lay down on the ground and sleep away our sore and tired muscles. While sleep is important, the recovery that we as athletes do immediately after our workouts is so, so crucial to our success for the rest of the season. Stretching and refueling are the two big components of recovery, but it is also wise to do some sort of shoulder exercises or foam rolling to reduce both soreness and the risk of injury.

Sometimes, practice can be the best part of our day. Other times, it can be the worst. However, regardless of how the rest of the day went, every jump in the pool is a fresh start. Treat each workout like a stepping stone to your end of season meet, and help others along the way. Be as positive as you can, and even if you don’t hit the pace you want to or make that super hard interval, know that you gave it all you had each and every day. Trust that that is enough!

All commentaries are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Swimming World Magazine nor its staff.

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For the First Time, Katie Ledecky Comes Up Short

Photo Courtesy: SPIA USA

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By David Rieder.

The prospects of Katie Ledecky not finishing first in the women’s 200 free final were real, very real. During the first three days of the World Championships, Ledecky has insisted that she believed she was clicking, but her times had just not been up to her usual standard.

She had missed her world record in the 400 free by almost two seconds and was off her global standard in the 1500 free by six seconds—although she appeared to ease up in the mile when she realized how massive a lead she had built.

The biggest warning sign, though, was her split on the U.S. women’s 400 free relay. Yes, she pulled the Americans into the lead, but that was despite a split of 53.83, more than a second slower than the 52.7 splits she had put up at the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

Oh, and while Ledecky had been a bit shy of her best, Emma McKeon had been flying. The 23-year-old Australian had already won silver in the 100 fly in a lifetime-best time of 56.18 and anchored the Aussie 400 free relay to silver with a career-best split of 52.29.

emma-mckeon-flyrecovery-australia

Photo Courtesy: lan MacNicol

McKeon had won bronze in the 200 free at the Olympic Games and had put down a swift 1:54.99 in the semi-finals, good enough for the No. 2 seed going into finals behind Ledecky’s 1:54.73. Going into the final, both felt supremely confident

“It’s feeling really good,” Ledecky said. “I think 1:54 coming off the mile (less than an hour before) is really good for me. Puts me in a good spot for tomorrow.”

“I’m relaxed,” McKeon said. “I found the right amount of nerves. I feel the most confident I have in a while, with my swimming and with myself.”

The battle for gold, in all probability, would be McKeon’s early speed vs. Ledecky’s ability to motor down the stretch and run everyone down. McKeon, surely, was the only threat to the dynamo Ledecky, who had previously swum in 13 individual finals at an Olympic or World Championship, and she had won gold in all of them.

For the first 150 meters of the race, that’s exactly what happened. McKeon built a big lead and was a half-second up at the halfway mark, but Ledecky closed the gap to one hundredth off the final turn. It was game on.

But little did either Ledecky or McKeon know: Federica Pellegrini was about to come up and steal the gold medal.

Pellegrini, who had amazingly won a medal in the 200 free at each of the previous six World Championships, was in third place with one lap to go. But closing speed has long been Pellegrini’s calling card, and at that moment, she downshifted.

Pellegrini’s split on the final 50 was 28.82, seven tenths faster than anyone else in the field. Ledecky tried to go to her extra gear, but the tank was empty. She ended up with the sixth-fastest closing 50 in the field.

“I could just feel it at the end that I didn’t have that extra gear that I normally have,” Ledecky said. “I was just trying to get my hand to the wall. I couldn’t really see much the last 50.

Ledecky had no explanation as to what went wrong. All she knew was that Pellegrini, who never considered Ledecky unbeatable, was coming hard. Pellegrini touched the wall in 1:54.73, four hundredths slower than Ledecky’s semi-final time, but it was enough to reclaim her gold medal.

“Everything seemed to be in slow-motion to me in the water. At 150 meters on the turn we were all there, so I closed my eyes and went for it,” Pellegrini said. “It’s incredible. I didn’t believe I would make it—I still can’t believe it.”

emma-mckeon-surprised-2017-world-champs

Photo Courtesy: SIPA USA

She had become the first swimmer, male or female, to win a medal in one event in seven straight World Championships. Pellegrini won silver in 2005, bronze in 2007 and then golds in 2009 and 2011—her 2009 time in a world record-time that still stands. But in both 2013 and 2015, she finished second— to Missy Franklin in 2013 and Ledecky in 2015.

Six years after she last stood atop the podium, Pellegrini had her retribution in Budapest.

Ledecky finished in 1:55.18, tied with McKeon for the silver medal. She had swum a half-second slower than she had the night before in the semi-finals.

Afterwards, there were only questions about what went wrong. That’s what happens when you lose your first major international final in 14 tries, after going undefeated for her first five years competing for Team USA.

“I don’t know if I went out too hard or just was feeling yesterday, the rest of the meet,” she said. “Maybe I haven’t been quite on point as much as I would have hoped to have been this week, but I’ve still been feeling good. That was mostly a matter of how I executed my race. It wasn’t anything really too wrong or additional to that.”

Of course, no need to hit the panic button, as it would take an upset much bigger than Pellegrini’s for Ledecky not to return to the top of the podium as part of the U.S. women’s 800 free relay Thursday or in the 800 free individual race Saturday.

But after so many years of invulnerability, of always stepping up to the biggest challenge, it was a bit disconcerting watching Ledecky actually not have all the answers when she needed them.

Ledecky was calm and collected after the race, not pouting about one final gone wrong, and she smiled for photos on the medal podium with Pellegrini and McKeon. Setbacks happen to every swimmer, but for Ledecky, it had been a long time waiting for something to go wrong.

“It happens. Happens to every athlete at some point,” Ledecky said. “I know this race will really motivate me moving forward and the rest of the week.”

Just how motivated will she be? Just how much does Katie Ledecky hate to lose? She—and the rest of the world—are going to find out.

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Federica Pellegrini’s Shocking Upset of Katie Ledecky Highlights Night Four in Budapest

Photo Courtesy: SIPA USA

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The fourth night of swimming from the 2017 FINA World Championships featured crazy finishes and upsets across the board. The big story of the night was Italian Federica Pellegrini upsetting Katie Ledecky in the 200 free final with an amazing last 50. Fellow Italian Gabriele Detti used a similar tactic in the 800 free final as he won the race thanks to an amazing last 100.

Chad Le Clos had a minor upset in the men’s 200 fly final as he held off Hungarian superstar Laszlo Cseh in the men’s 200 fly final. Adam Peaty missed his 50 breast world record but got under 26 seconds and won his second gold medal of the meet in the 50 breast.

The United States all-star mixed medley relay team of Matt GreversLilly KingCaeleb Dressel and Simone Manuel broke the world record in the mixed medley relay that was set earlier in the prelims.

Results

Tonight’s events:

  • Women’s 200 Free
  • Men’s 100 Free (SF)
  • Women’s 50 Back (SF)
  • Men’s 200 Fly
  • Men’s 50 Breast
  • Women’s 200 Fly (SF)
  • Men’s 200 IM (SF)
  • Men’s 800 Free
  • Mixed Medley Relay

Women’s 200 Free

They say anything can happen on any given day. They say any person can be beat on any given day. Even if that means the unstoppable Katie Ledecky. On Wednesday night at the 2017 FINA World Championships in Budapest, Ledecky was dealt her first loss in a major meet in the 200 free to Federica Pellegrini of Italy.

The Italian world record holder shocked the field after her stellar last 50 with a 28.82 on the last 50 to win the 200 final with a 1:54.73. Pellegrini has now medaled at seven straight World Championships in the 200 free dating all the way back to 2005. She adds to the gold medals she won in 2009 and 2011.

Pellegrini out swam Katie Ledecky and Emma McKeon who tied for second at 1:55.18. It is McKeon’s third medal of the meet.

Russia’s Veronika Popova (1:55.26), Hong Kong’s Siobhan Haughey (1:55.96), USA’s Leah Smith (1:56.06), Hungary’s Katinka Hosszu (1:56.35) and France’s Charlotte Bonnet (1:56.62) also swam in the A-final.

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Men’s 100 Free (SF)

The men’s 100 free semi-finals featured some young up-and-comers as well as some veterans into tomorrow’s final at the 2017 FINA World Championships in Budapest. France’s Mehdy Metella had the fastest time of the semi-finals with a 47.65 just ahead of Americans Caeleb Dressel (47.66) and Nathan Adrian (47.85).

The Australian duo of Cameron McEvoy (47.95) and Jack Cartwright (47.97) will also have a good chance at the medals along with Britain’s Duncan Scott (48.10). Ukraine’s Sergii Shevtsov (48.30) and Brazil’s Marcelo Chierighini (48.31) round out the top eight.

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Women’s 50 Back (SF)

The women’s 100 back world record was broken last night at the 2017 FINA World Championships in Budapest and the 50 record was narrowly missed on Wednesday night at the pool. Brazil’s Etiene Medeiros swam a 27.18 to just miss the record of 27.06 held by Zhao Jing of China from 2009. The time for Medeiros is a South American record. Medeiros is just ahead of China’s Fu Yuanhui (27.19) into tomorrow’s final.

USA’s Kathleen Baker also broke an American Record with a 27.48 to beat Natalie Coughlin’s record of 27.51 from 2015. Great Britain’s Georgia Davies (27.49), Australia’s Emily Seebohm (27.51) and Holly Barratt (27.51), Belarus’ Aliaksandra Herasimenia (27.54) and China’s Wang Xueer (27.60) will also swim in tomorrow’s final where a world record could fall down.

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Men’s 200 Fly

People thought he was crazy for going out too fast. People thought he was done after failing to medal last summer in the 200 fly. People didn’t think he stood a chance against the Hungarians in their home crowd. But Chad Le Clos silenced all those doubters with a world title in the 200 butterfly on Wednesday in Budapest.

Le Clos went out fast in the final with a 53.2 and held on for the gold medal with a 1:53.33 to hold off Hungarian Laszlo Cseh (1:53.72) and Japanese Daiya Seto (1:54.21). Le Clos won his second world title in the 200 fly after he originally won in 2013.

Hungary’s Tamas Kenderesi (1:54.73), USA’s Jack Conger (1:54.88), Japan’s Masato Sakai (1:55.04), Denmark’s Viktor Bromer (1:55.30) and Bulgaria’s Antani Ivanov (1:55.98) also swam in the final.

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Men’s 50 Breast

Great Britain’s Adam Peaty missed his world record from the semi-finals in the 50 breast but won another gold medal after he broke 26 seconds again. Peaty won the 50 breast on Wednesday night at the 2017 FINA World Championships in Budapest with a 25.99. Peaty ran away with the title away from Brazil’s Joao Gomes (26.52) and South Africa’s Cameron van der Burgh (26.60). The time for Gomes was a new South American Record.

Felipe Lima (26.78), Kevin Cordes (26.80), Fabio Scozzoli (26.91), Kirill Prigoda (27.01) and Ilya Shymanovich (27.27) also swam in the A-final.

Peaty repeats his World Title from 2015 and it is the third overall gold medal for Great Britain in the 50 breaststroke at the World Championships. Peaty joins himself and James Gibson (2003) as winners in the event for the Brits.

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Women’s 200 Fly (SF)

Germany’s Franziska Hentke leads the 200 fly semis into tomorrow’s final at the 2017 FINA World Championships with a 2:06.29. Hentke leads a tightly packed final ahead of China’s Zhou Yilin (2:06.63) and Spain’s Mireia Belmonte (2:06.71).

Japan’s Suzuka Hasegawa (2:07.01), China’s Zhang Yufei (2:07.11), Hungary’s Katinka Hosszu (2:07.37), Liliana Szilagyi (2:07.67) and South Korea’s An Sehyeon (2:07.82) will also swim in the A-final tomorrow.

Asian swimmers have won the last three World titles in the women’s 200 fly with China’s Jiao Liuyang (2011), Liu Zige (2013) and Japan’s Natsumi Hoshi (2015) winning the last few titles.

USA’s Hali Flickinger (2:07.89, 9th) and Dakota Luther (2:09.55, 15th) did not make it out of semi-finals in the event.

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Men’s 200 IM (SF)

The United States has won seven straight world titles in the men’s 200 IM with Michael Phelps winning three and Ryan Lochte winning the last four. Chase Kalisz has a chance to extend that winning streak to eight on Thursday night at the 2017 FINA World Championships in Budapest. Kalisz swam a 1:55.88 on Wednesday to lead the 200 IM semi-finals. Kalisz will get serious pressure in the final from Japan’s Kosuke Hagino who is the second seed at 1:56.04.

Great Britain’s Max Litchfield (1:56.70), Switzerland’s Jeremy Desplanches (1:56.86), Japan’s Daiya Seto (1:56.92), Germany’s Philip Heintz (1:57.27), China’s Wang Shun (1:57.39) and China’s Qin Haiyang (1:57.81) will swim in the final tomorrow. China’s Qin re-broke his World Junior record from the prelims that stood at 1:59.01.

Abrahm DeVine from the US finished 10th and will not swim in tomorrow night’s final as he swam a 1:58.01.

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Men’s 800 Free

The Italians are having a wonderful night in the Danube Arena in Budapest on the fourth night of swimming at the 2017 FINA World Championships. They started the night with Federica Pellegrini stunning Katie Ledecky in the 200 free final and ended the individual events by placing two men on the podium in the 800 free.

Gabriele Detti used a 1:55.68 on his last 200 to over swim Poland’s Wojciech Wojdak (7:41.73) and his Italian teammate Gregorio Paltrinieri (7:42.44). Wojdak and Paltrinieri had the lead at the 700 but Detti used a 28.33 penultimate 50 to draw even and eventually pull away to win his first individual world title. Detti won the title in a similar fashion to Pellegrini in the 200 earlier by sling-shotting by the leaders on the last 50 to snag the win.

The time for Detti is a new European record.

Norway’s Henrik Christiansen (7:44.21), China’s Sun Yang (7:48.87), Austria’s Felix Aubock (7:51.20), Germany’s Florian Wellbrock (7:52.27) and United States’ Zane Grothe (7:52.43) also swam in the final.

Sun was going for his fourth straight World title in the 800 as China had won the last four titles in the event with Zhang Lin winning in 2009 before Sun won threes straight. Sun did not have the endurance to hang with the medalists. This is Italy’s first gold medal in the 800 at the World Championships.

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Mixed Medley Relay

Team USA continued to dominate the mixed 400 medley relay, loading their relay with four Olympic gold medallists as their members.

Matt Grevers got the race up to a swift start with a 52.32 split, holding off Australia’s Mitch Larkin and China’s Xu Jiayu, before transitioning to recent breaststroke World Champion Lilly King. King (1:04.15) faced a field of mainly men as Adam Peaty moved Great Britain up into contention.

King touched the wall and it was all Caeleb Dressel. The sprint phenom chased down Australia, Canada, China, Great Britain, and Russia to deliver the lead to Simone Manuel with a sizzling 49.92 split. Manuel held the lead, unleashing a 52.17 split to power Team USA to a combined World Record time of 3:38.56.

The race for silver went to Australia (3:41.21) and there was a tie for bronze with Canada and China (3:41.25) touching simultaneously. The Aussies saw stellar splits from the ladies as Emma McKeon (56.51) and Bronte Campbell (52.30) finished them off. Canada also led off with a solid swim from Kylie Masse on backstroke as she went 58.22. Masse could not set a world record on the lead-off even if she went faster than her 58.10 from yesterday. The Canadians were also brought home by Penny Oleksiak (56.18) and Yuri Kisil (47.71).

Great Britain (3:41.56), Russia (3:43.02), Germany (3:46.03) and Italy (3:46.33) also competed in the A-final. Britain also had some swift splits from Adam Peaty (57.12) and James Guy (50.51) on breast and fly.

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Photo Gallery: Day Four Finals of 2017 FINA World Championships

Photo Courtesy: SIPA USA

The fast swims continued into night four as Team USA established a second World Record in the mixed 400 medley relay. The Americans changed tactics and relay members for the finals, choosing Matt Grevers, Lilly King, Kevin Cordes, and Simone Manuel – all Olympic gold medallists.

Adam Peaty continued his sprint breaststroke dominance with a second 50 breast under 26 seconds. Peaty delivered a 25.99 for his second gold of the meet.

Arguably one of the biggest stories of the night was Federica Pellegrini’s upset win over Katie Ledecky in the 200 free. Pellegrini unleashed a 28.82 final 50 split to chase down both Ledecky and Emma McKeon for gold and a time of 1:54.73. McKeon and Ledecky would conclude the race with matching 1:55.18s for the silver.

Chad le Clos dominated the men’s 200 fly, powering to the finish ahead of the crowd favorite: Laszlo Cseh.

To read the full recap of the day four finals, click here and head over to the 2017 FINA World Championship page for more!

Day 4 finals photo gallery:

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Commit Swimming Set of The Week: High Intensity Race Pace

Photo Courtesy: Peter H. Bick

Welcome to Swimming World’s Set of the Week sponsored by CommitSwimming.com! This week’s set is a race pace set featuring some high intensity kicking. Take a look at the set below and the description that follows:

300 cruise

3 x 100 as:

2 build

1 at 500 pace

Extra :30 rest

200 fast kick

2 x 150 cruise

3 x 100 as:

1 build

2 at 500 pace

Extra :30 rest

200 fast kick

4 x 75 cruise

3 x 100 as:

3 at 500 pace

Extra :30 rest

200 fast kick

commitswimming
This set mixes together race pace swimming, aerobic maintenance, and high intensity kicking to create a very challenging 2400 yard set. The set moves through three rounds of varying distances and intensities, always beginning with 300 yards of aerobic cruise before moving into 100’s race pace and ending with a 200 fast kick.

The aerobic work should be on a moderate interval that gives your athletes roughly :10-:15 seconds rest per 100, while the race pace work can be on a relatively softer interval to let your athletes really get up to race speeds.

The added component of this set that takes it to the next level is the addition of the fast kicking after each set of race pace swims. Give your athletes an extra 30 seconds reset after their last race pace 100 and then challenge them to grab a kickboard and time their 200’s to see what they can maintain throughout the set. Happy swimming!

LEARN MORE ABOUT WORKOUTS FROM COMMITSWIMMING.COM

Download Commit’s App To Use On Your Pool Deck.

Take control of your pool deck with Commit’s apps for iOS and Android. No need to burry your head in your phone all practice, but Commit is there for those few minutes you need it. Take attendance , quickly and easily modify the workout, take some notes about the practice so you don’t forget. Everything you need for your workout is on 1 screen. Commit is designed with your time in mind, so you can get back to what you do best… coaching. Now when practice ends, you can get home to your family or meet up with friends right away without wasting extra time in the office.

All swimming and dryland training and instruction should be performed under the supervision of a qualified coach or instructor, and in circumstances that ensure the safety of participants.

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Italian Gabriele Detti Uses Stellar Finish to Win 800 Final

Photo Courtesy: Erich Schlegel-USA TODAY Sports

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The Italians are having a wonderful night in the Danube Arena in Budapest on the fourth night of swimming at the 2017 FINA World Championships. They started the night with Federica Pellegrini stunning Katie Ledecky in the 200 free final and ended the individual events by placing two men on the podium in the 800 free.

Gabriele Detti used a 1:55.68 on his last 200 to over swim Poland’s Wojciech Wojdak (7:41.73) and his Italian teammate Gregorio Paltrinieri (7:42.44). Wojdak and Paltrinieri had the lead at the 700 but Detti used a 28.33 penultimate 50 to draw even and eventually pull away to win his first individual world title. Detti won the title in a similar fashion to Pellegrini in the 200 earlier by sling-shotting by the leaders on the last 50 to snag the win.

The time for Detti is a new European record.

Norway’s Henrik Christiansen (7:44.21), China’s Sun Yang (7:48.87), Austria’s Felix Aubock (7:51.20), Germany’s Florian Wellbrock (7:52.27) and United States’ Zane Grothe (7:52.43) also swam in the final.

Sun was going for his fourth straight World title in the 800 as China had won the last four titles in the event with Zhang Lin winning in 2009 before Sun won threes straight. Sun did not have the endurance to hang with the medalists. This is Italy’s first gold medal in the 800 at the World Championships.

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Tips For Maintaining A Healthy Body Weight

The desire to transform is a great motivator to eat right and exercise. Whether you’re shedding excess fat or filling out your physique with a few extra pounds of muscle, the desire to capture the perfect physique keeps you motivated and on track.

But what happens once you’ve achieved your goal? How do you sustain your transformation and maintain the physique you’ve worked so hard to build?

Preserving a healthy body weight is often easier said than done—and for many, it’s a lot harder than the transformation. Once you remove the driving force to reach a goal, motivation can become difficult to sustain.

IFBB pro Amy Updike shares her best tips for maintaining a healthy body—including daily movement, proper hydration, mindful eating, and updated goal setting—so you can stay lean and fit for years to come.

Be Active Every Day

The key to keeping your metabolism high and sustaining a healthy body weight is to move as often as possible. This doesn’t mean you have to hit the gym every day, but it does mean you have to find ways to keep your body moving.

“Try to do something active every single day,” says Updike. “Walk the dog, play with your kids in the park, or clean the house.”

When she decides she needs a break from her normal gym workouts, Updike incorporates other activities to help her burn calories and stay fit.

“I’ll do hiking, trail running, or go out and do some jump squats and walking lunges in the park,” she explains.

For more ideas to get your daily move on, check out my article “Revving Up Your Summer Calorie Burn: Outdoor Activities that Blast Fat Fast!”

Drink More Water

You’ve heard it before and you’ll hear it again: Healthy bodies need plenty of water. As Updike explains, adequate hydration allows for optimal bodily functions—and that includes fat loss.

“Drinking enough water also helps prevent those hunger thoughts,” she explains. “Usually, you’re not hungry, just thirsty.”

Updike makes an excellent point: People often mistake thirst for hunger and eat when they should hydrate instead. This pesky habit can raise your daily calorie intake. It also can destroy your efforts to maintain that chiseled body you worked so hard for.

A good rule of thumb is to drink 8-10 cups of water per day. But if you want to learn more, check out “Top 10 Reasons We Need To Drink Water.”

Power Up with Protein

When it comes to eating for a healthy body weight, Amy Updike cannot overstate the importance of protein. In her words, getting a good amount of protein in every meal you eat “allows for stabilized blood sugar levels and helps you feel fuller.” Protein is also essential to build and repair muscle and maintain lean mass.

Choose lean, high quality sources of protein like chicken, turkey, lean red meat, fish, egg whites, and whey protein powder. Consume at least 15-30 grams of protein per snack or meal, increasing this number if needed for your individual macronutrient needs.

Eat Your Veggies

Another must for your diet plan is eating plenty of fresh vegetables.

“Eating an adequate amount of vegetables each day will help your body maintain regularity, help you feel fuller, and help supply your body with fiber, vitamins, and minerals,” says Updike.

Vegetables are low in calories, so they have a minimal impact on your total calorie intake. But avoid high-calorie cooking methods or adding sauces or condiments that contain extra sugar, fat, or other unnecessary calories.

Updike recommends consuming at least three servings of vegetables per day—if not more—to help maintain a healthy weight. Include a variety of vegetables in your plan to avoid boredom. Experiment with fresh, seasonal vegetables whenever possible for added nutrients.

Ditch Yo-Yo Dieting

If you plan to simply diet your way back down to a healthy weight every time you put on a few pounds, rethink your approach. Up-and-down “yo-yo” dieting is hard on your body and unsustainable—neither of which will help you maintain.

To keep the body you’ve worked so hard for, find a plan you can adopt as a lifestyle, not a short-term fix.

“Focus on eating and living in a way you could maintain lifelong,” says Updike.

Constant hunger, feeling deprived of favorite foods, and viewing meal prep as a major time suck are all signs your current plan is not working for you.

A proper diet should leave your body, as well as your mind, fulfilled. This is not an excuse to eat as much food as possible whenever you want. But if you’re craving chocolate, take a bite or two to satisfy your hunger.

Maintenance is all about sustainability, which is a huge reason why Updike supports flexible dieting and counting macros. Using this approach—and being mindful of portion control—you can work your favorite foods into your meal plan so you never have to feel deprived again.

Keep Setting More Goals

Fitness is a journey, not a destination. Just because you’ve reached one goal doesn’t mean you can’t set new ones. In fact, you should. However, Updike cautions against using weight as your only measurement of success.

“It’s important not to focus on only appearance or bodyweight related goals,” she says.

Single-minded emphasis on appearance can be dangerous—especially if you’ve already achieved an ideal body weight and are trying to work beyond what is healthy.

If you’re not looking to add or lose weight, try making your next goal a physical challenge. Examples include training for a half marathon, adding 30 pounds to your squat, or learning a new skill like yoga or boxing.

Whatever you choose, set the goal and create a plan to reach it. This will help you stay focused so you feel as though you are making progress while you maintain your healthy physique.

As Updike puts it, “Feeling great and being able to live life to the fullest are the real goals of fitness.”

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Qin Haiyang Once Again Downs 200 IM World Junior Record

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Just one session after slipping past Michael Andrew’s 200 IM World Junior Record, China’s Qin Haiyang has once again re-writen the record books.

Qin bypassed the 1:58 range to move his prelims record of 1:59.01 down to a sizzling 1:57.81.

Comparative splits:

  • Qin (2017 – sf): 25.29, 30.49, 33.65, 28.38 = 1:57.81
  • Qin (2017 – h): 25.52, 31.19, 33.81, 28.49 = 1:59.01

He will continue on to tomorrow night’s finals as the eighth place seed.

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Germany’s Franziska Hentke Leads 200 Fly Semis; No Americans Make Final

Photo Courtesy: R-Sport / MIA Rossiya Segodnya

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Germany’s Franziska Hentke leads the 200 fly semis into tomorrow’s final at the 2017 FINA World Championships with a 2:06.29. Hentke leads a tightly packed final ahead of China’s Zhou Yilin (2:06.63) and Spain’s Mireia Belmonte (2:06.71).

Japan’s Suzuka Hasegawa (2:07.01), China’s Zhang Yufei (2:07.11), Hungary’s Katinka Hosszu (2:07.37), Liliana Szilagyi (2:07.67) and South Korea’s An Sehyeon (2:07.82) will also swim in the A-final tomorrow.

Asian swimmers have won the last three World titles in the women’s 200 fly with China’s Jiao Liuyang (2011), Liu Zige (2013) and Japan’s Natsumi Hoshi (2015) winning the last few titles.

USA’s Hali Flickinger (2:07.89, 9th) and Dakota Luther (2:09.55, 15th) did not make it out of semi-finals in the event.

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Adam Peaty Breaks 26 Seconds Again; Wins Another World Title

Photo Courtesy: SIPA USA

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Great Britain’s Adam Peaty missed his world record from the semi-finals in the 50 breast but won another gold medal after he broke 26 seconds again. Peaty won the 50 breast on Wednesday night at the 2017 FINA World Championships in Budapest with a 25.99. Peaty ran away with the title away from Brazil’s Joao Gomes (26.52) and South Africa’s Cameron van der Burgh (26.60). The time for Gomes was a new South American Record.

Felipe Lima (26.78), Kevin Cordes (26.80), Fabio Scozzoli (26.91), Kirill Prigoda (27.01) and Ilya Shymanovich (27.27) also swam in the A-final.

Peaty repeats his World Title from 2015 and it is the third overall gold medal for Great Britain in the 50 breaststroke at the World Championships. Peaty joins himself and James Gibson (2003) as winners in the event for the Brits.

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